Protein Rich Entree – Vegan Sausage, Spinach & White Beans

This one pot wonder is perfect for a breast cancer recovery diet. Easy to make and the whole family can enjoy!  Also use organic ingredients when possible.

Ingredients:

  • 1 Package of Vegan Italian Sausage
  • 2 Cups of Vegetable Broth
  • 2 Cloves Garlic
  • 1 Tbsp Dried Oregano
  • 1 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 Can Drained Cannellini Beans
  • 1 Can Diced Italian Tomatoes or 2 Diced Plum Tomatoes
  • 6 Cups Baby Spinach (1 bag)

Directions:

  1. Fry vegan spinach in Olive Oil when done add garlic and cook for 2 minutes.
  2. Add vegetable both, beans, tomatoes cook for 7 minutes.
  3. Add baby spinach, stir into mixture just until wilted.
  4. Put into and sprinkle Nutritional Yeast on top.
  5. Enjoy!

A combination of a healthful diet and physical activity seems to be particularly important, as was shown in the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living Study, which included 3,088 women previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Women who had at least five servings of fruits and vegetables each day and averaged 30 minutes of walking 6 days per week had roughly half the risk of dying from breast cancer, compared with women who ate fewer vegetables and fruits or who were less active.

So a healthful plant-based diet helps in many ways. It makes weight control easier, helps you avoid unhealthful fats, and keeps fruits and vegetables front and center. This combination, along with regular exercise, helps prevent cancer and also reduces the risk of recurrence.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

 

 

Bile Acids and Breast Cancer

Bile Acids and Breast CancerWhy do constipated women appear to be at higher risk for breast cancer? The results of a 1989 study out of the American Journal of Public Health suggested a slight increased risk of breast cancer for both decreased frequency of bowel movements and firm stool consistency. Women who had three or more bowel movements a day appeared to cut their risk of breast cancer in half. This could be because constipation means a greater contact time between our waste and our intestinal wall, which may increase the formation and absorption of fecal mutagens—substances that cause DNA mutations and cancer—into our circulation, eventually ending up in breast tissue.

The concept that more frequent bowl movements decrease breast cancer risk dates back more than a century, where severe constipation, so-called “chronic intestinal stasis,” was sometimes dealt with surgically. Figuring that the colon was an inessential part of the human anatomy, why not cure constipation by just cutting it out? After the surgery, they noticed that potentially precancerous changes in the breasts of constipated women seemed to disappear.

It would take another 70 years before researchers followed up on the clues by those distinguished surgeons who claimed breast pathology cleared when constipation was corrected. A 1981 study published in The Lancet investigated the relation between potentially precancerous changes in the breast and the frequency of bowl movements in nearly 1,500 women (See Breast Cancer and Constipation). The researchers found that the risk of precancerous changes was four times greater in women reporting two or fewer bowel movements a week compared to more than once daily.

We know that even the non-lactating breast actively takes up chemical substances from the blood. We also know that there are mutagens in feces. It is not unreasonable to suggest that potentially toxic substances derived from the colon have damaging or even carcinogenic effects upon the lining of the breast. Toxic substances like bile acids. Bile acids were first shown to promote tumors in mice in 1940, but subsequent experiments on rats led to the mistaken belief that bile acids just promoted existing cancers and couldn’t initiate tumors themselves. However, there is a fundamental difference between the rodent models and human cancer. Rats only live a few years while humans can live dozens, so the opportunity for cancer causing mutations may be at least 30 times greater in humans. We now have at least 15 studies that show that bile acids can damage DNA, strongly suggesting they can initiate new cancers as well.

Bile acids are formed as a way of getting rid of excess cholesterol. Our liver dumps bile acids into the intestine for disposal, assuming our intestines will be packed with fiber to trap it and flush it out of the body. But if we haven’t been eating enough fiber-rich whole plant foods, bile acids can be reabsorbed back into the body and build up in the breast.

Carcinogenic bile acids are found concentrated in the fluid of breast cysts at up to a hundred times the level found in the bloodstream. By radioactively tagging bile acids, researchers were able to show that intestinal bile acids rapidly gain access to the breast, where they can exert an estrogen-like cancer-promoting effect on breast tumor cells. This would explain why we see 50% higher bile acid levels in the bloodstream of newly diagnosed breast cancer victims. These findings support the concept of a relationship between intestinally-derived bile acids and risk of breast cancer. So how can we facilitate the removal of bile acids from our body?

Slowed colonic transit can increase bile acid levels. Therefore, to decrease absorption of bile acids, we can speed up the so-called “oro-anal transit time,” the speed at which food goes from mouth to toilet, by eating lots of fiber. A diet packed with plants greatly increases bile acid excretion.

Fiber can bind up and remove other toxic elements like lead and mercury as well as cholesterol and bile acids. But plants can bind bile acids even independent of fiber. Vegan diets bind significantly more bile acid than lacto-ovo or non-vegetarian diets even at the same fiber intake, which could explain why individuals eating vegetarian might excrete less mutagenic feces in the first place.

I touched on this in my live presentation From Table to Able: Combating Disabling Diseases with Food, but what I didn’t get to discuss is the relative bile acid binding abilities of different foods. I cover that in my video Which Vegetable Binds Bile Best?

What intestinal transit time should we be shooting for? See Food Mass Transit. That may be why Stool Size Matters. Also, How Many Bowel Movements Should You Have Every Day? We can improve speed and size by Bulking Up on Antioxidants and eating lots of whole plant foods (Prunes vs. Metamucil vs. Vegan Diet).

Fiber may also help women remove excess estrogen from their body. See my video Fiber vs. Breast Cancer. For more on the wonders of fiber, see Dr. Burkitt’s F-Word Diet.

For more of my latest videos on breast cancer prevention and survival, see:

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

3 Great Romaine Lettuce Summer Wrap Recipes

By: Dawn Lange, Co Founder of Breast Cancer Yoga.

Each week we share delicious, and sometimes simple recipes of select foods that are good in the prevention of breast cancer. Summer wraps are popular, healthy and easy to make. We chose Romaine Lettuce wraps because the dark green leaves provide more beta carotene and vitamin C than paler leaves, and provide bioflavonoids for protection against cancer specifically prostrate and uterus cancer. Bioflavonoids may block the onset of new tumors, inhibit growth and spread of existing tumors, and thought to protect eyesight.

3 Great Vegan Summer Wrape Recipes For Breast Cancer Prevention

Black Bean Romaine Wrap
Serves 1

1 Black Bean Burger patty
2 Romaine lettuce leaves
1 small tomato
1/4 avocado
pinch of pink Himalayan salt (optional)

Cook the Black Bean Burger patties per instructions. Wash and dry lettuce. Cut the tomato into slices. Remove 1/4 of the Avocado “meat” from skin. Place half of the Black Bean Burger patty and half of each ingredient into the lettuce leaves, creating two wraps. Sprinkle with just a pinch of salt to taste. Wrap the leaves into tight rolls and then slice in half. Enjoy right away or refrigerate and take to the beach for a light lunch!

Vegan Romaine Lettice Wrap Recipes From Breast Cancer Authority Blog

Quinoa Burger Romaine Wrap
Serves 1

1 Quinoa Burger patty
2 Romaine lettuce leaves
1 small tomato
1/4 avocado
pinch of pink Himalayan salt (optional)

Cook the Quinoa Burger patties per instructions. Wash and dry lettuce. Cut the tomato into slices. Remove 1/4 of the Avocado “meat” from skin. Place half of the Quinoa Burger patty and half of each ingredient into the lettuce leaves, creating two wraps. Sprinkle with just a pinch of salt to taste. Wrap the leaves into tight rolls and then slice in half. Enjoy right away or refrigerate for later.

Summer Vegan Wrap Recipes For Breast Cancer Prevention

Hummus (Pizza, Sour Cream & Onion, or Buffalo Style) Romaine Wrap
Serves 1

1/2 cup Hummus
2 Romaine lettuce leaves
1 small tomato
1/4 avocado
pinch of pink Himalayan salt (optional)

Prepare hummus  per directions. Wash and dry lettuce. Cut the tomato into slices. Remove 1/4 of the Avocado “meat” from skin. Place quarter of a cup hummus  and half of each ingredient into the lettuce leaves, creating two wraps. Sprinkle with just a pinch of salt to taste. Wrap the leaves into tight rolls and then slice in half. Enjoy right away or refrigerate for later.


 

Dawn Breast Cancer

About Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

MY JOURNEY WITH CANCER

Valerie's Profile Picture For Breast Cancer Authority Blog

My name is Valerie Kelly-Hodenius and Diana Ross is my sister.  Despite being diagnosed in June of 2013 with stage four breast cancer, I have been feeling great.  Because I have been doing so well, Diana asked me to share my story with you.

I was first diagnosed in 1997 with stage two breast cancer.  It was found by a routine mammogram.  At that time I did the usual medical treatments:  surgery twice, chemotherapy and radiation.  I also did acupuncture and took Chinese herbs.  To me the herbs looked like a concoction of tar paper, compost and old tampons.  And, frankly, that is what they tasted like to me.  I lived through it, but I felt like I lost two years of my life.  I went regularly for mammograms and all were clear including one in May of 2013.

In June of 2013 I sneezed and began experiencing the most excruciating pain.  I went to the doctor for an ultrasound of my gall bladder as we all thought I was having a gall bladder attack.  I was diagnosed with stage four breast cancer.  The tumors filled my liver to capacity and slopped over to my bones in a few areas.  You can imagine how the idea of chemo felt to me especially when my dear friend, a physician, started talking about a pic line.

I decided to interview for the right oncologist.  I have very specific requirements for my medical providers.  They need to be knowledgeable and up to date but just as important is that they can listen to my ideas and respect the idea that I know my own body.  I interviewed a few oncologists that my medical friends recommended.  I chose the oncologist at Dana Farber because she introduced herself by her first name, looked me square in the face while we were talking and made me feel like I was her only client.  She gives me test results as soon as they are available to her.  And she is available to me by email anytime I have needed.

My next decision was how I wanted to treat the cancer.  My doctor offered me an aromatase inhibitor since my cancer was estrogen and progesterone positive.  This seemed acceptable but I wanted to explore what else might be available.  I happened upon a documentary about Dr. Max Gerson.  His regimen seemed to me to be the perfect option.  The more I read about how what you put in your mouth affects you, the more convinced I became.  Well, let me tell you, this was quite a change from how I had been eating despite my diet had been superior to how the average person eats.
The day I got diagnosed I had a CT scan and blood work.  I had my LFT’s drawn and tumor markers.  They were all extremely abnormal.  When I saw my oncologist for follow up lab work two months later all levels had improved by about 30%!  I told her that I had chosen this vegan diet.  She said, very respectfully, that there wasn’t any medical evidence to support that it made any difference.  But I decided that it was the right route for me because I believed in it.  Two months later I had my blood work checked again and a repeat CT scan.  The labs went down another 30% and there was healthy liver tissue in a third of my liver.  My LFT’s were almost normal!

The other great benefit for me on the Gerson diet was that I quickly lost 50 of my unwanted pounds.  I feel great and have with the exception of that first week.  One of the lovely consequences for me is that I have been able to be completely dissociated from the stage four cancer.  I believe that whatever treatment or road you choose, the most important part is that you believe it is the thing that will work for you.

How Do Plant- Based Diets Fight Cancer?

By Michael Greger M.D.

Plant-Based Diets Fight Cancer

Why do centenarians—those who live to be over a hundred years old—escape cancer? As you can see in my 3-min. video IGF-1 as One-Stop Cancer Shop, as we get older our risk of getting and dying from cancer grows year by year until we hit about 85 or 90, and then cancer risk starts to drop. It seems that centenarians are endowed with a particular resistance to cancer. So what’s their secret?

Every day, 50 billion of our cells die, and every day, 50 billion new ones are born. There’s a balance. Otherwise your body would shrink or get too crowded. Sometimes we need grow, like when we’re a baby or for that growth spurt around puberty. Our cells don’t get larger when we grow up; they increase in number. A child’s hand may only be made up of about 50 billion cells and may have to add half trillion or so while growing up.

Once we’re all grown up, though, we don’t want a lot of extra cells hanging around. We still need our cells to grow and divide, but out with the old and in with the new. We don’t want to be making more cells than we’re putting out to pasture. When you’re a kid, extra growth can be good; when you’re an adult, extra growth can mean a tumor.

How do our cells know when to tip the scale in favor of more dividing with less dying and when to come back into balance? A key signal is IGF-1, a growth hormone called insulin-like growth factor number one. IGF-1 levels go up when you’re a kid so you grow and then come back down when you’re done growing. Should your levels stay a bit too high as an adult, though, there’s a constant message sent to your cells to grow, grow, grow, divide, don’t die, keep going, keep growing. Not surprisingly, the more IGF-1 we have in our bloodstream, the higher our risk for many types of cancer.

When you’re a kid, growth is good, but too much growth when we’re all grown up can mean cancer. In my 90-second video, Cancer-Proofing Mutation, I describe Laron Syndrome, a type of dwarfism caused by congenital IGF-1 deficiency. Those affected don’t have that IGF-1 spurt in childhood so they grow up short-statured, but not having an excess of IGF-1 in their systems as an adult makes them nearly cancer-proof. This raises the question of whether one can achieve the best of both worlds by ensuring adequate IGF-1 levels during childhood and then suppressing excess growth promotion in adulthood. This can be done with a plant-based diet as I described in my last blog posts Cancer-Proofing Your Body and Treating an Enlarged Prostate With Diet, as well as in my 4-min. video The Answer to the Pritikin Puzzle.

Who is Pritikin? See Engineering a Cure. What’s the puzzle? See Ex Vivo Cancer Proliferation Bioassay. The binding protein findings I describe in the video may explain the findings in Is It the Diet, the Exercise, or Both?

For more on IGF-1, I’ve touched on it before in Dairy Hormonal Interference and Meat Hormones & Female Infertility.

-Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here and watch my 2012 year-in-review presentation Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death.

Image credit: The Birkes / Flickr

Tagged cancer, centenarians, dwarfism, IGF-1, insulin, Nathan Pritikin, tumor

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