How to Block Breast Cancer’s Estrogen-Producing Enzymes

The vast majority of breast cancers start out “hormone-dependent,” meaning the primary human estrogen, called “estradiol plays a crucial role in [breast cancer] development and progression.” That’s one of the reasons why soy food consumption appears so protective against breast cancer—because soy phytoestrogens, like genistein, act as estrogen-blockers. They block the binding of estrogens, like estradiol, to breast cancer cells.

But, wait a second. “The majority of breast cancers occur [after menopause], when the ovaries have [stopped producing estrogen].” What’s the point of eating estrogen blockers if there’s no estrogen to block? It turns out the breast cancer tumors themselves produce their own estrogen from scratch to fuel their own growth.

Estrogens may be formed in breast tumors by multiple pathways. The breast cancer takes cholesterol, and, using the aromatase enzyme, or two hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, produces its own estrogen.

So, there’s two ways to stop breast cancer. One is to use “antiestrogens,” estrogen-blockers, like the soy phytoestrogens, or “the anti-estrogen [drug] tamoxifen…However, another way to block estradiol is by using anti-enzymes” to prevent the breast cancer from making all the estrogen in the first place.

And, indeed, there are a variety of anti-aromatase drugs in current use. In fact, inhibiting the estrogen production has been shown to be “more effective” than just trying to block the effects of the estrogen—”suggesting that the inhibition of estrogen synthesis is clinically very important for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer.” It turns out soy phytoestrogens can do both.

Using ovary cells taken from women undergoing in vitro fertilization, soy phytoestrogens were found to reduce the expression of the aromatase enzyme. What about in breast cancer cells, though? Breast cancer cells, too—not only suppressing aromatase activity, but the other estrogen-producing enzyme, too.

But, this is in a petri dish. Does soy suppress estrogen production in people too Well, circulating estrogen levels appear significantly lower in Japanese women than American white women. And, Japan does have the highest per capita soy food consumption. But, you don’t know it’s the soy until you put it to the test. Japanese women were randomized to add soymilk to their diet—or not—for a few months. Estrogen levels did seem to drop about a quarter in the soymilk-supplemented group. Interestingly, when they tried the same experiment in men, they got similar results: a significant drop in female hormone levels, with no change in testosterone levels.

These results, though, are in Japanese men and women that were already consuming soy in their baseline diet. So, it’s really just looking at “higher versus lower…soy intake.”

What happens if you give soymilk to women in Texas? Circulating estrogen levels cut in half. Since increased estrogen levels are a “[marker] for high risk for breast cancer,” the effectiveness of soy to reduce estrogen levels may help explain why Chinese and Japanese women have such low rates of breast cancer.

And, what was truly remarkable is that estrogen levels stayed down a month or two, even after they stopped drinking it. This suggests you don’t have to consume soy every day to have the cancer-protective benefit.

Doctor’s Note

Wait, soy protects against breast cancer? Yes, in study after study after study. Even in women at high risk? See BRCA Breast Cancer Genes & Soy.

Even if you already have breast cancer? See Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors?

Even GMO soy? See GMO Soy & Breast Cancer.

Okay, then, Who Shouldn’t Eat Soy? Watch that video too! 🙂

What else can we do to decrease breast cancer risk? See:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

The Ultimate Green Juice For A Boost Of Energy

This ultimate green juice is delicious and healthy and will give you a boost of energy!  This green juice is filled with antioxidants, phytochemicals, minerals and vitamins — sometimes as much as a day’s worth of vegetables in one serving.

This recipe is probably one of the tastiest I ever tried. It’s sweet, but not too much. Also, this recipe is kind of forgiving in its quantities. I mean that if you like the juice to be less sweet, you may use more cucumbers and parsley, and less fruits, or the opposite. 

What you need:

  • 3 royal gala apples
  • handful parsley
  • 5 small cucumbers
  • Half of pine apple, peeled and cut to smaller pieces
  • 10 fresh mint leaves (upgrade the taste dramatically!)
  • 4 kiwi

What to do:

Simply use a cold pressed juicer to create this beautiful green amazing juice!

You may strain it again after it’s ready to remove any extra pulp, but I like the pulp as it contains an important fiber. 

Enjoy!

To get more of these great recipes visit Neeva’s website  The Innergy

 

How Much Soy Should You Eat To Lower Breast Cancer Risk?

So, we know 7 to 18 servings of soy a day may neutralize some of the beneficial effects of avoiding animal protein. At the same time, studies have repeatedly found that women who eat lots of soy appear to have a lower risk of getting breast cancer, and a better risk of surviving breast cancer than those who don’t eat soy. So is there some magic number of soy food servings we should shoot for?

So far we know that somewhere between 7 and 18 may not be so good, so more than 18 definitely gets the axe. This two year study found no effect on IGF levels of adding two servings of soy foods daily, whether they were tofu, soy milk, soy nuts, or the concentrated soy isolate found in plant-based meats, protein bars, or protein powder; still fine.

Still got a big range here. This study suggested 5 to 10 servings a day was bad— increased IGF—so we’re kind of slowly but surely narrowing down the safety window. Same year in Japan; three servings a day cleared the IGF radar. And then, that’s it. That’s all the science we have so far.

The bottom line is that legumes should be a part of everyone’s daily diet, which means lentils, peas, and/or beans, ideally with each of our meals—of which soy is an excellent choice. But, I recommend that we should probably stick to no more than 3 to 5 servings a day.

Doctor’s Notes

This is the fourth in a string of videos on the role plant and animal proteins play in determining levels of the cancer-promoting growth hormone IGF-1. Also see IGF-1 as One-Stop Cancer ShopProtein Intake and IGF-1 ProductionHigher Quality May Mean Higher RiskAnimalistic Plant Proteins; and Too Much Soy May Neutralize Benefits. For the role soy plays in extending breast cancer survival, see Breast Cancer Survival and Soy. And, I’ve got dozens of other videos on soy.

For further context, be sure to check out my associated blog posts: How Much Soy Is Too Much? and Why Less Breast Cancer in Asia?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

Delicious & Sugar Free Protein Brownies – Recipe For A Cancer Diet

Breast cancer patients can exhibit an increased demand of protein. Tumors utilize glucose as their main source of energy supply. Thus, a diet supplying the cancer patient with sufficient protein while restricting the sugars tumors thrive on, is a helpful strategy in improving a breast cancer patients healthy recovery.

This protein rich recipe includes hemp protein powder which is not marijuana. The two plants are distant relatives, having similar physical appearances and structures but little more.  Marijuana flowers contain a chemical called THC which, when heated and ingested, causes intoxication.  Marijuana has been used for this reason as a medicine for thousands of years.

Hemp, on the other hand, contains 0.00% THC, so has no narcotic effect on people.  Hemp has never been used as a medicine; it has strictly been used primarily as a fiber plant and secondarily as a food crop.  Hemp can only be grown with a government issued permit and requires mandatory lab testing to ensure that all hemp grown contains 0.00% THC.

With this in mind we wish to share this protein rich recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 2 Small Ripe Bananas
  • 3 Tbsp Ground Flax Seed
  • 
3 Tbsp Chia Seeds
  • 2 Packets Truvia or Stevia
  • 1/2 Tsp Baking Powder
  • 
1/2 Tsp Baking Soda
  • 2 Scoops Chocolate Hemp Protein Powder
  • 
1/2 Tbsp Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
  • 1 Tsp Vanilla Extract

Directions:

  1. Peel Bananas
  2. Add bananas to a blender or food processor and blend until smooth
  3. Mix in: baking powder, baking soda, vanilla and Stevia.
  4. Mix in flax-seed
  5. Stir Chia Seeds
  6. The batter should look like poppy-seed muffin mix
  7. Add 2 scoops of chocolate hemp protein powder.
  8. To give the brownies an extra chocolate boost, stir in unsweetened cocoa powder.
  9. Pre-heat Oven to 350 degrees.
  10. Grease a baking pan (8 x 8).
  11. Spread out brownie batter evenly across the baking pan. (about 1/2 inch thick)
  12. The batter cooks how it is (does not rise) put onto the baking sheet, no rising or flattening.
  13. Bake 10-12 minutes.
  14. Cut into eight brownies.

85 Calories, 2.5 g fat, 133 mg potassium, 10.5 g Carbs, 4 g Fiber, 3 g Sugar, 6 g Protein.

A healthy diet is only one of several factors that can affect the immune system; exercise and stress management are just as important in improving your overall health and well-being.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange: Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Delicious Tempura Mushrooms – Vegan and Crispy

Another delicious way to enjoy mushrooms – and so much healthier than any tempura you buy!

What you need:

  • 10-15 fresh button mushrooms, cut to halves
  • 7 spoons rice flour (placed in a bowl or plate)
  • 1/2 cup reduced sodium soy sauce (placed in a bowl)
  • Avocado oil to stir-fry
  • Always use organic ingredients when possible

What to do:

  1. Heat the oil in a wide pan until it’s very hot.
  2. Dip the mushrooms in the soy sauce and then coat them with the rice flour.
  3. Stir-fry the mushrooms in the oil from both sides until they are soft from the inside and crispy from the outside.

You may eat the mushrooms by itself or add them to a salad. It’s best to eat them hot.

Enjoy!

To get more of these great recipes visit Neeva’s website  The Innergy

Visit: www.NeverMeatAgain.com

Yummy Veggies & Cream (Gluten Free & Vegan) Great for a Cancer Diet

yummy-veggies-cream-gluten-free-vegan-great-for-a-cancer-dietThis mui-delich (very tasty!) dish can work as a pasta dressing or as a dish by itself! It’s vegan, super-yummy and you will not stay hungry! It’s also beautiful but I bet you will not look at it long before you finish it all!

What you need:

  • 20 button mushrooms, cut to half
  • 1/2 red pepper, cut to cubes
  • 4 cherries tomatoes, cut to half
  • Handful chopped chives
  • Pink Himalayan salt to taste
  • Use organic ingredients when possible

For the cream:

  • 2 Handful raw cashews
  • 1/2 garlic clove
  • 2 cups alkaline water

What to do:

  1. Add the cream ingredients to a strong blender and blend until smooth.
  2. Add the cream and the rest of the ingredients to a wide pan and saute for 15 minutes.
  3. When ready, use it as a dressing for pasta or eat it as is!

Enjoy!

To get more of these great recipes visit Neeva’s website  The Innergy

Visit: www.NeverMeatAgain.com

Cauliflower & Sweet Potato with Coconut Cream (Gluten Free)

cauliflower-sweet-potato-with-coconut-cream-gluten-freeIf you love coconut, this is your dish!

What you need:

2 large Sweet Potatoes, peeled and sliced
2 Potatoes, peeled and sliced
1/2 head cauliflower
7 green onions, chopped
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
1/2 tbs turmeric
1 spoon coconut oil
1 can unsweetened coconut cream
4 cups baby spinach
Salt to taste

Always use organic ingredients when possible.

What to do:

  1. Cook the sweet potatoes, potatoes and cauliflower in boiled water until fork-tender. When ready, rinse and set aside.
  2. Set aside half of the green onions.
  3. Add the rest of the green onions to a blender together with the turmeric, cilantro and the coconut cream. Blend until smooth.
  4. Warm the coconut oil in a wide pan until it melts and add the green onions on top. Stir-fry for 1 minute and then add the baby spinach and stir-fry until tender.
  5. Pour in the coconut cream mixture. Add the potatoes, sweet potatoes and cauliflower. Mix everything in the sauce and add salt.

You may serve it as is, or serve it on rice. I like to serve it on yellow rice (white rice cooked with turmeric).

Enjoy!

To get more of these great recipes visit Neeva’s website  The Innergy

Visit: www.NeverMeatAgain.com

Email: neeva@goldfish1.com

Should Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer Avoid Soy?

Five studies have been performed on breast cancer survival and soy foods, involving more than 10,000 breast cancer patients. And, those who eat more soy live longer, and have a lower risk of the cancer coming back. But, what about women who carry breast cancer genes? Fewer than 10% of breast cancer cases run in families. But, when they do, it’s most likely mutations to one of the tumor suppressor genes—BRCA1 or BRCA2—that defend the integrity of our genes. They are involved in DNA repair, and so, if either one of them is damaged, or has mutations, chromosomal abnormalities can result, which can set us up for cancer.

This idea that we have tumor suppressor genes goes back to famous research in the 60s that showed that if you fuse together a normal cell with a cancer cell, the cancer cell doesn’t turn the normal cell malignant. Rather, the normal cell suppresses the cancerous one. Tumor suppressor genes are typically split up into two types. There are gatekeeper genes that keep cancer cells in check, and caretaker genes that keep the cell from going cancerous in the first place. And, BRCA genes appear able to do both—that’s why their function is so important.

breast-cancer-and-soy-concernsUntil recently, dietary recommendations for those with mutations focused on reducing DNA damage caused by free radicals, by eating lots of antioxidant-packed fruits and vegetables. If your DNA-repair capacity is low, you want to be extra careful about damaging your DNA in the first place. But, what if we could also boost BRCA function?

In my last video on the topic, I showed how, in vitro, soy phytoestrogens could turn back on BRCA protection suppressed by breast cancer, upregulating BRCA expression as much as 1,000% within 48 hours. But, does that translate out of the petri dish and into the person? Apparently so.

Soy intake was only associated with 27% breast cancer risk reduction in people with normal BRCA genes, but a 73% risk reduction in carriers of BRCA gene mutations. So, a healthy diet may be particularly important in those at high genetic risk. Meat consumption, for example, was linked to twice as much risk in those with BRCA mutations—97% increased risk, instead of just 41% increased risk of breast cancer in those with normal BRCA genes.

Doctor’s Note

What about for women without breast cancer genes, or for women who have already been diagnosed? That was the subject of my last video, Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors?. The older video I referred to is BRCA Breast Cancer Genes & Soy.

What is in meat that may increase risk? See, for example:

Featured Image From Authority Nutrition and Livestrong.

In health,

Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

How to Make Stevia Extract to Reduce Your Sugar Intake

how-to-make-stevia-extractI’ve shied away from stevia in the past, because I hate its aftertaste. But, if you are trying to reduce your sugar intake, it is probably your best option of sweetener to use. So how can we make it more palatable? Today I’ll show you how to make your own stevia extract that doesn’t have a horrid aftertaste.

Years ago, I went to a cooking class on gluten-free and sugar-free baking. It was the worst cooking class I have ever attended – for various reasons! It was a demonstration, and the foods that were prepared were very high in refined carbohydrates (albeit gluten free ones) and fats. But no sugar – they used stevia instead. When we got to taste the dishes – I hated them all! I think that was the first time I had ever had stevia – and that aftertaste just wouldn’t go away.

But today, after some investigation, I am a little more tolerant of stevia. You can reduce or avoid its aftertaste,which makes stevia a good option to help you transition to avoiding sugar and other artificial sweeteners.

Stevia comes from the leaves of a plant called Stevia rebaudiana, and is usually found as a powder or a liquid extract. The active compounds of stevia are steviol glycoside – which has 150 times the sweetness of sugar. Stevia does not affect blood glucose levels, and some studies show it may help improve insulin sensitivity.

What I have found is that the bitter aftertaste is apparent when too high a concentration of stevia is used. Even though recipes with stevia call for just a few drops – if the extract or powder is really concentrated, that can still be too much. So taking it easy is the way to go.

To make stevia powder, collect stevia leaves and dry them, then finely chop them in a blender. The dried leaf powder can be used as is, in certain recipes – but they won’t dissolve, so don’t try them in your coffee!

There are many different ways to prepare an extract, with variables including:

  • using fresh leaves or dried leaves

    I use fresh leaves that I grow myself. They are easy to grow, and the plant regrows every year. The ideal time to harvest the leaves is around August – when the flowers start to appear but before the flowers start dying. If you leave it too late, you are more likely to get bitterness. If you can’t get fresh leaves, you can buy the dried leaves and use them instead.

  • with alcohol or  without alcohol

    I use alcohol – vodka – for my extract, because it extracts the sweetness well, and quickly. Any recipe calls for only a few drops of extract, which means there is negligible alcohol in the final product.

  • duration of the extraction time

    I extract for a relatively short period because, again, I find that the sweetness comes through quickly, and there is more likely to be an aftertaste if you leave the leaves in the alcohol for a longer period.

  • concentrating the extract by heating

    I choose not to heat the extract and reduce it as I don’t want it to be highly concentrated. By leaving the extract as it is, the amount you put into a recipe is more controllable. Yes, maybe I’ll use 6 drops instead of 2, but I can taste it as I go along and adjust the sweetness to how I want it.

Obviously, you can adjust these to your own taste. Here’s the recipe. I hope you’ll give it a try. If you live near me and want some leaves – just let me know.H

Homemade stevia extract:

Ingredients

  • Fresh stevia leaves
  • Unflavored vodka
  • (you can vary the amount as you wish – for proportions, see the recipe).

Instructions

  1. Wash the stevia leaves
  2. Roughly tear the leaves into a couple of pieces and place them in a clean jar. I filled the jar with leaves – but they weren’t compressed down.
  3. Add enough vodka to cover the leaves. For my jar, this was about half full as the liquid compresses the leaves.
  4. Seal and shake the jar.
  5. Leave for 8-12 hours. Taste the liquid to see if it is sweet enough.
  6. Strain the liquid into a bottle and discard the leaves.
  7. Keep the bottle in the dark, or use a brown colored bottle. Having a dropper helps, as only a few drop are needed to sweeten foods.
Recipe Type: Sugar-free, gluten free, vegan, paleo, sugar substitute

Notes:

If you prefer a more concentrated extract, you can gently simmer the extract to boil off some of the alcohol.

Ruth BaillieRuth Baillie is originally from the UK and now lives most of the year in Northern California. She holds two Master’s degrees, one in Personalized Nutrition (distinction), and another in Health Psychology. She is a Registered Nutritional Therapist, Certified Professional Cancer Coach, and Cancer Guide, and has undertaken considerable post-graduate studies in integrative naturopathic oncology. She is the author of “Choices in mind-body medicine for cancer patients in Sonoma County, California” and her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals.

Prevent Breast Cancer With These 5 Healthy Lifestyle Choices

Healthy Lifestyle Choices To Prevent CancerNecessary Lifestyle Choices for Optimum Health
An anti-cancer lifestyle will include a variety of exercise, organic foods, clean pure water and air. There are a few easy steps to keep the body safe and healthy. It is important to cultivate an awareness of what feels and taste right going into your body. It is equally important to stop and take notice of bad choices. Ask yourself “Is this good or bad for me? “Will it make me feel better or worse?” We all want to feel alive and vital.

1. Exercise – Yoga
Practicing Restorative Yoga For Breast Cancer Recovery has shown through studies to encourage and improve sleep and to enhance overall quality of life. (Reuters Health) – About one third of breast cancer survivors experience fatigue that affects their quality of life. A new study found that doing yoga might help restore some lost vitality. (bit.ly/sSZeZZ)

There are some simple suggestions to start exploring a change in vitality:

2. Cancer Prevention Foods – Vegetarian/Vegan Diet
It is suggested to eat a plant base diet of fruits and vegetables: make your diet rich in organic fruits and vegetables that are full of micronutrients and bioflavonoids which are duly noted to help prevent breast cancer or other cancers. Five or more servings per day is recommended by the American Cancer Institute. Red and blue berries hold a significant amount of necessary cell builders and anti-cancinogens that are a necessity on our tables.

Here are some simple choices to select from to start improving your health:

3. Water Therapy – Alkaline Water
Alkaline water (referred to as ionized water) can neutralize or decrease the acidity of the body’s pH caused by stress, modern diet, and air pollution. We suggest trying this water and feeling the possible positive effects.

Find a water store and get alkaline water by the gallon (it usually stays charged with negative ions for up to 48hours)
Purchase if possible a home alkaline water system that filters pollutants as well as charging the water with negative ions and anti oxidants

  • Benefit from the many ways to use alkaline water like necessary hydration for the body’s cells

4. Manage Stress – Learn to breathe
Deep breathing is vital in that it encourages the release of body toxins, rebuild healthy tissue which consequently increases overall energy. This true oxygen exchange stimulates digestion, assimilation and elimination. A very important function of breathing fully and slowly is that the body’s natural relaxation response is prompted. This relaxation response results in decreased tension, anxiety and fatigue.

A great place to start is with our single down-loadable breathing exercises or you could do the following.

5. Laugh Often – Emotional Balancing
It has been shown that even when manipulated to smile people in truth feel happier and joyful. Laughter can stop depression right in its tracks and boosts our immunity.

We suggest the following to bring on happiness.

  • Have a daily joke sent to your e-mail
  • Watch funny YouTube videos
  • Listen to the comedy channel on the radio
  • Download comedians from iTunes
Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us atinfo@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Restorative Yoga

%d bloggers like this: