Cranberry, Lemon & Walnut Vegan Cheese Balls

Cranberry, Lemon & Walnut Vegan Cheese Balls For A Breast Cancer DietAfter sharing with the breast cancer community  Micheal Greger, MD’s post Which Fruit Fights Cancer Better? we wanted to follow up with a recipe that included the top fruits that slow cancer cell growth. If you didn’t get a chance to read this researched based article the two best fruits are cranberries and lemons along walnuts which will be featured this week.

Recipe Author: Cara of Fork & Beans
Serves: 4
Ingredients

  • 1 c. raw cashews, soaked 2+ hours, drained
  • 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (use refined if you don’t like the coconut flavor)
  • Juice of ½ lemon (or 2 tsp. apple cider vinegar)
  • ¼ tsp. sea salt
  • ⅓ c. dried cranberries, chopped
  • ¾ c. walnuts, chopped
  • 2 pieces of plastic wrap
  • 1 bowl

Instructions

  1. Place the cashews, coconut oil, wine, lemon juice and salt into a high-speed blender and begin to mix until smooth. Add 1 tablespoon of water at a time if it is too thick to blend. You shouldn’t need more than 2 Tbsp. of water most likely.
  2. Add the cranberries and only ¼ c. of the walnuts to roughly blend for a couple of seconds.
  3. Line a bowl with plastic wrap as pictured above and spoon the cheese sauce inside. Wrap the top up securely and place in the freezer for 1 hours until it begins to set.
  4. Take the cheese out of the plastic wrap and in a shallow bowl place the remaining ½ c. chopped walnuts in and gently roll the cheese ball around until it is completely covered in walnuts. Wrap in a clean piece of plastic wrap, placing it back in the bowl and into the freezer for another hour.

cara (2) Native of Los Angeles, Cara is the crazy, chocolate-filled woman behind Fork & Beans. On a mission to recreate every treat known to mankind, she has every intention of making them gluten, egg, and dairy-free. Oh, and super tasty too. From a range of Girl Scout Cookies, homemade candy bars, to a collection of childhood favorite snacks–nothing is off-limits. You can follow Fork & Beans on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. You can also pre-order the upcoming published cookbook Decadent Gluten-free Vegan Baking here.

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Protein Brownie Recipe For Breast Cancer Recovery

Protein Brownies For Breast Cancer RecoveryBy: Breast Cancer Yoga Staff.

Many cancer patients exhibit an increased demand of protein. Tumors utilize glucose as their main source of energy supply. Thus, a diet supplying the cancer patient with sufficient protein while restricting the sugars tumors thrive on, is a helpful strategy in improving a breast cancer patients healthy recovery. With this in mind we wish to share this protein rich recipe.

Ingredients:

2 Small Ripe Bananas

3 Tbsp Ground Flax Seed


3 Tbsp Chia Seeds

2 Packets Truvia or Stevia

1/2 Tsp Baking Powder


1/2 Tsp Baking Soda

2 Scoops Chocolate Vegan Protein


1/2 Tbsp Unsweetened Cocoa Powder

1 Tsp Vanilla Extract

Directions:

  1. Peel Bananas
  2. Add bananas to a blender or food processor and blend until smooth
  3. Mix in: baking powder, baking soda, vanilla and Truvia.
  4. Mix in flax seed
  5. Stir Chia Seeds
  6. The batter should look like poppy seed muffin mix
  7. Add 2 scoops of chocolate vega protein mix.
  8. To give the brownies an extra chocolate boost, stir in unsweetened cocoa powder.
  9. Preheat Oven to 350 degrees.
  10. Grease a baking pan (8 x 8).
  11. Spread out brownie batter evenly across the baking pan. (about 1/2 inch thick)
  12. The batter cooks how it is put onto the baking sheet, no rising or flattening.
  13. Bake 10-12 minutes.
  14. Cut into eight brownies.

85 Calories, 2.5 g fat, 133 mg potassium, 10.5 g Carbs, 4 g Fiber, 3 g Sugar, 6 g Protein.

A healthy diet is only one of several factors that can affect the immune system; exercise and stress management are just as important in improving your overall health and well being.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange: Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

BRCA Breast Cancer Genes and Soy

BRCA Breast Cancer Genes and SoyBy: Dr. Michael Greger, Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Why do people who eat legumes—beans, chickpeas, split peas, and lentils live longer? Well, men and women who eat legumes tend to be lighter, have a slimmer waist, lower blood pressure, lower blood sugars, lower cholesterol, lower triglycerides, better kidney function and so no surprise may live longer, but, interestingly, bean intake was a better protectant against mortality in women than men. They think this may be because cancer was the leading killer of women in this population, especially breast cancer. And we know that breast cancer survivors who eat soy foods, for example, have a significantly lower likelihood of the cancer recurrence, eating soy foods appears to protect against the cancer coming back. This 2012 review looked at the three prospective human studies done to date and found that women who ate the most soy had a 29% lower risk of dying from breast cancer and a 36% lower risk of cancer recurrence. And a fourth study was since published, and it showed the same thing. Soy food intake is associated with longer survival and lower recurrence among breast cancer patients. With an average intake of soy phytonutrients above 17 mg/day, which is about what’s found in a cup of soymilk, the mortality of breast cancer may be able to be reduced by as much as 38%.

Here’s the survival curve over five years… The purple line represents the survival of the women with the highest soy consumption. As you can see, after 2 years all of the breast cancer survivors eating lots of soy were still alive, but a quarter to a third of the women who ate the least soy were dead. And after 5 years 90% of the tofu lovers were still alive and kicking, where as half of the tofu haters kicked, the bucket. And you see a similar relationship when you look at breast cancer survival and soy protein intake, as opposed to the phytonutrient intake.

How does soy so dramatically decrease cancer risk and improve survival? Soy may actually help turn back on BRCA genes. BRCA is a so-called caretaker gene, an oncosuppressor, meaning a cancer-suppressing gene responsible for DNA repair. Mutations in this gene can cause a rare form of hereditary breast cancer, popularized by Angelina Jolie’s public decision to undergo a preventive double mastectomy, but only about 5% of breast cancers run in families. So 95% of breast cancer victims have fully functional BRCA genes, so if their DNA repair mechanisms are intact, how did breast cancer form, grow, and spread? It does it by suppressing the expression of the gene through a process called methylation. The gene’s fine, but cancer found a way to turn it off, or at least turn it down, potentially facilitating the metastatic spread of the tumor.

And that’s where soy may come in. Maybe the reason soy intake is associated with increased survival and decreased cancer recurrence is because the phytonutrients in soy turn back on your BRCA protection, removing the methyl straightjacket the tumor tried to place on it, so researchers put it to the test. These are three different types of human breast cancer, specially stained so that the expression of BRCA genes shows up brown. So this is what full DNA repair would look like, hopefully what normal breast cells would look like. Lots of brown, lots of BRCA expression, but instead we have column 2, raging breast cancer. Well if you add soy phytonutrients to the cancer, BRCA gets turned back on, the DNA repair appears to start ramping back up. Though this was at a pretty hefty dose, equivalent to about a cup of soybeans, their results suggest that treatment with soy phytonutrients might reverse DNA hypermethylation and restore the expression of the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. May help with other breast cancer genes as well. Women at increased genetic risk of breast cancer may especially benefit from high soy intake.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.
Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Doctor’s Note

Legumes leading to a longer life? See my last video, Increased Lifespan From Beans.

No matter what genes we inherit, changes in diet can affect DNA expression at a genetic level. For examples see:

I’ve previously covered the available science in Breast Cancer Survival and Soy. Other effects detailed in:

It may be possible to overdo it, though (How Much Soy Is Too Much?).

For more context check out my blogs: Top 10 Most Popular Videos from 2013 and Can Eating Soy Prevent Breast Cancer?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

Holiday Vegan & Sugar-Free Cookie Recipes For Breast Cancer

Healthy Cookie Recipes For Breast CancerBy: Breast Cancer Yoga Staff.

Here are 2 delicious cookie recipes that you can make for a family member who is undergoing cancer treatments and can not eat traditional holiday sugar cookies. We suggest decorating the cookie box or basket in holiday colors. Always use organic ingredients when possible.

No Bake Chocolate Coconut Balls

Ingredients:
1¼cup coconut flakes, shredded, unsweetened
4 tablespoons cocoa powder, unsweetened
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
¼ teaspoon salt
½ cup chocolate chips*(recipe below)
1 banana, mashed
½ teaspoon chocolate liquid stevia
9 dates, pitted, chopped

Directions:

  1. Blend one cup of the coconut flakes with the banana and cocoa in a food processor.
  2. A small amount at a time add the chopped dates to the food processor.
  3. Once thoroughly combined until smooth mix in the stevia, vanilla extract and salt.
  4. Place mixture into a bowl and stir in the chocolate chips.
  5. Place the ¼ cup of coconut flakes onto a plate.
  6. Make 14 small chocolate balls from the mixture then roll them into the coconut flakes. Refrigeration is not necessary, but if you are not eating them right away I would keep them in the fridge to stay firm until you are ready to eat.

No Bake Chocolate Coconut BallsNaturally Sweetened Dark Chocolate Chunks

Ingredients:
4 ounces- 100% cacao, unsweetened [Ghirardelli baking bar]
4 tablespoons coconut oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3- 5 teaspoons Wisdom Natural 100% Natural Stevia Sweetener Powder

Directions:

  1. In a microwaveable bowl melt the chocolate, vanilla extract and the oil in the microwave for about a minute or over the stove on low heat until completely melted.
  2. Stir in the stevia powder.
  3. Taste it and see if it is sweet enough for you. If not increase stevia by 1/4 teaspoon until it is to your liking.
  4. Pour the chocolate liquid onto a parchment lined baking sheet.
  5. Spread with a spoon to smooth. Don’t spread the chocolate too thin.
  6. Freeze for about an hour.
  7. Break into chunks.
  8. Makes about 2 cups.

(Recipe From SugarFreeMom.com)

Vegan Peanut Butter Oatmeal Cookies For Breast CancerSugar-Free Vegan Peanut Butter, Oatmeal and Banana Cookies

Ingredients:
1/3 cup peanut butter
2 ripe bananas (overripe is fine)
1 tsp vanilla
2 tbsp almond milk
2 tbsp maple syrup
2 ½ cups quick cooking or rolled oatmeal
dash cinnamon (optional)
1/4 cup flour

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, mash bananas with a fork until smooth.
  2. Add peanut butter, soy milk, vanilla and maple syrup and mix well.
  3. Add remaining ingredients and stir until well combined.
  4. Drop spoonfuls of dough onto an ungreased cookie sheet and bake 13-16 minutes at 350 degrees, or until done.

Note: Watch out for added sugar! This recipe is only truly sugar-free if you used unsweetened peanut butter and unsweetened almond milk, so read the ingredients list and look for almond milk that says “Unsweetened” right on the label. (Recipe From Jolinda Hackett of AboutFood.com)

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

 

Celebrate A Compassionate Thanksgiving – 50 Recipe Ideas

Breast Cancer Yoga Family Members Celebrating A Vegan Thanksgiving

Breast Cancer Yoga Family Members Celebrating A Vegan Thanksgiving

By: Breast Cancer Yoga Staff.

Host a vegan Thanksgiving in your home this year. Instead of a giant sad turkey in the center of your table, try a mouthwatering vegan entree.  A meat-free, plant-based Thanksgiving is easier than ever! We have assembles a few recipes (courtesy of PETA) for your family to try this holiday season. Here are 50 Recipes For A Vegan Thanksgiving This Year!..

Appetizers and Snacks

Soups and Salads

Entrées

Side Dishes

Gravies

Desserts

For either ethical or health reasons, many people are making the switch to a vegetarian or vegan diet.These delicious recipes will please every palate giving everyone—including animals—something to be thankful for this holiday season.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Arugula Salad With Citrus Dressing Recipe For A Healthy Cancer Free Lifestyle Diet

Arugula Salad with Citrus Dressing

By: Breast Cancer Yoga Staff.

Arugula is a Cruciferous Vegetable That is Associated With Reduced Breast Cancer Risk:
A number of population studies have found a lower risk of breast cancer associated with consumption of one or more cruciferous vegetables. Cruciferous vegetables contain a variety of sulfur-containing compounds call glucosinolates which can be converted into various isothiocyanates that have chemopreventive activities against breast cancer. Arugula contains a meaningful level of isothiocyanates. So try our Arugula Salad recipe and reduce your of breast cancer at the same time.

Recipe Makes 4 Servings

Ingredients:
1 pkg. fresh organic arugula
1/2 avocado
1 or 2 clementines
8 sliced cherry tomatoes
1 lemon
1 orange
raspberries (handful)

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Dressing Recipe:
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup orange juice (squeeze fresh orange)
2 tablespoon lemon juice (squeeze fresh lemon)
1/4 lemon, zested
1/2 teaspoon pink salt
1/4 teaspoon of celery seeds
1/4 teaspoon of dulse flakes
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar

Blend all ingredients together in glass container. Serve immediately on salad.

It’s easy to begin eating more of a plant-based diet, and exciting to experience the energy and vitality that a balanced vegan diet gives. By embracing a few simple changes, health improves, and energy is gained. We want to continue on the path of good nutrition and wellness. The natural state of our body is great health, and if we provide good nutrition and a healthy lifestyle, it will return to that natural state.

Diana RossAbout Diana Ross:  E-RYT 500 restorative yoga teacher, survivor that cares and founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Diana is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Fiber vs. Breast Cancer

Fiber Rich Diet To Prevent Breast CancerBy Michael Greger, M.D., NutritionalFacts.Org.

A recent editorial in the journal of the American Association for Cancer Research starts out “There are far too many breast cancer survivors,” by which she means it’s great that women with breast cancer are living longer, but lamenting the fact that the number of women getting breast cancer in the first place isn’t going down. ‘A million women every year. As with any other epidemic, identification and aggressive reduction of any reversible risk factors must become an immediate priority.

One such risk factor appears to be inadequate fiber consumption. For example, this new study out of Yale. Among pre-menopausal women, higher intake of soluble fiber (highest versus lowest quartile of intake) was associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer, 62% lower odds. And when they just looked at younger women with the hardest to treat tumors, the estrogen receptor negative tumors, then those eating the most fiber appeared to have 85% lower odds of breast cancer. This is what’s called case-control study, where you compare women who already have disease to those that don’t and you ask both to tell you what they used to eat. And so how they get these statistics is that the breast cancer patients were significantly less likely to report eating lots of plant foods, the only natural place fiber is found. The reason it’s important to understand how they arrived at their conclusion is that maybe it’s not the fiber at all that’s what’s so protective. The reduced risk of breast cancer associated with dietary fiber intake observed in this study may in fact indirectly reflect the effects from other dietary nutrients, and thus dietary fiber here may simply act as a marker for other exposures which have been linked to a reduced risk of human cancer as well, such as folate, phytochemicals, carotenoids, vitamin C and E which are also like dietary fiber found in plant foods, such as vegetables, fruits, and pulses (legumes, beans peas lentils soy), as well as in grains. And look, if you’re eating more plants, you may be eating fewer animals. An increased consumption of fiber from foods of plant origin (such as vegetables, fruits, and grains) may reflect a reduced consumption of foods of animal origin.

A combined analysis of a dozen such studies published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute show they all found pretty much the same thing, a consistent, statistically significant, association between breast cancer risk and saturated fat intake, which is mostly from cheese and chicken, and consistent protective effect for a number of markers of fruit and vegetable intake was demonstrated; such as, which like fiber, is basically only found in plant founds.  Every 20 grams of fiber a day was associated with a 15% drop in breast cancer risk.

Case control studies are susceptible to something called recall bias, though, since they rely on people’s memory. If people with cancer are more likely to selectively remember all the bad things they ate, since they may be feeling responsible for their condition, it could artificially inflate the correlation; so prospective cohort studies may provide stronger evidence.That’s where you take a bunch of healthy women and follow them and their diets over time to see who gets cancer and who doesn’t. By 2011, 10 such studies had been done, and the same thing was found. Every 10-g/d increment in dietary fiber intake was associated with a significant 7% reduction in breast cancer risk. Pretty much the same the other studies found, remember, 15% for every 20 grams? This has important public health implications. That was 2011. By 2012 we were up to 16 prospective, or forward-looking studies on dietary fiber and breast cancer, and they found the same thing.  But for the first time it showed a nonlinear response.

The more fiber you eat the more benefit you appear to get. American women eat a little under 15 grams of fiber a day, less than half the minimum daily recommendation. Maybe that’s why vegetarian women may have lower breast cancer rates, more plant foods equals more fiber. But vegetarians only seem to be averaging about 20 grams a day. So one might really have to venture out into vegan territory, off the chart at 47 grams a day, or a really healthy vegan diet (59), or eat lots of vegan thai food averaging 68.7.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.
Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Slowing the Growth of Cancer

Prevent cancer growth with a plant based diet

By: Michael Greger M.D., NutriutionFacts.org.

Every year, hundreds of the top cancer scientists from countries around the world converge to discuss the latest on diet and cancer. I’d like to share what I found to be the most interesting highlight from this year’s conference.

First some background. One cancer cell never hurt anyone. Two cancer cells never hurt anyone. But a billion cancer cells…that’s when we start getting into trouble. So we have to slow and reverse the division and growth of cancer cells. We all have cells that could grow into tumors, but if we slow them down our immune systems may be able to clean them up before they spell trouble.

Take breast cancer, for example, the most common cancer among American women. Like all cancers, it starts with one cell. This is a photomicrograph, a photograph taken under a microscope of an actual breast cancer cell, which then divides and becomes two cells, then four, eight and so on. Every time the cells divide the tiny tumor doubles in size. The tumor only need double about 30 times and we’re up to a billion cancer cells, which is a tumor just large enough to be picked up by mammography. Even though it only has to double 30 times, it takes between 25 and a 1,000 days for cancer cells to double just once. So that means, from the time that first cell gets mutated, it takes between two and a hundred years before it actually shows up as a little tumor we can see.

The shortest known interval between exposure to a carcinogen and cancer is about 18 months, which is when the first leukemia cases started appearing after Hiroshima. Cancers need time to grow, and for most solid tumors, meaning non-blood tumors like breast cancer, cancer can take decades to develop. Many breast cancers may start in the teen years. Some think we actually may start developing breast cancer in the womb before we’re even born, and that depends in part on what our mom ate. This is what’s called the “promotion stage” of cancer.

Twenty years ago, I ate meat, a lot of meat. I very well may have mutated one of the cells in my prostate, liver, colon, but you know, I don’t mind if I get cancer in a 100 years. I don’t expect to be around to worry about it. The cancer may have been initiated by a DNA mutation, but if we don’t promote it, if we keep it dormant, if we slow it down, we may even be able to reverse its growth.

According to autopsy studies in Japan, they’ve got just as much prostate cancer as we do, but the rate of Japanese men dying from prostate cancer is 1/10 that of American men…until they start eating like us. Japan has the number one longest life expectancy of any nation. The U.S. falls right around 19th. When Japanese men finally do die though, many have tiny prostate tumors, but they die with their cancer instead of from their cancer. By age 80 the majority of men have tiny cancerous prostate tumors, and by age 40, 1/3 of women have microscopic cancerous breast tumors. It’s like atherosclerosis — about half of young Americans in their 20’s already have atherosclerotic plaques, hardening of their arteries.

Many of us, right now have tumors growing inside of us. So we can’t wait until later to start eating healthier. We have to start now.

How can we slow down and reverse cancer while it’s still microscopic? Well, for prostate and breast cancers, these tissues tend to be sensitive to growth-promoting steroid hormones like estrogen. So one way to decrease our levels of these steroid hormones may be to stop eating and drinking them by avoiding eggs, meat, and dairy.

Okay, let’s get to the new research. UCLA scientists placed women on a plant-based diet with exercise, and the levels of all measured growth hormones in their blood dropped dramatically. That’s not new news. It’s what they did next that made this one of the most exciting papers to come from that conference.

Before and after the dietary change was initiated, researchers drew blood from the women and dripped it on live human breast cancer cells growing in a petrie dish. After just two weeks, the blood of women on the plant-based diet reduced the cancer growth rate by 20%.

This is before — packed with cancer. This is after! Just two weeks on a plant-based diet. The blood circulating throughout their entire bodies was that in-hospitable to cancer. Again, many of us right now have tumors growing inside of us. So we can’t wait until we’re older to start eating healthier.

We have to start now. Tonight!

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Roasted Pumpkin Seed Hummus For A Healthy Lifestyle Diet

Roasted Pumpkin Seed Hummus For A Healthy Lifestyle Diet

By Breast Cancer Yoga Staff.

Homemade roasted pumpkin seeds beautifully accent this hummus.  If you know how to make hummus this is a real easy recipe (hummus & pureed roasted pumpkin seeds). This is one recipe you will want to try! Always use organic ingredients when possible.

Ingredients
1 1/2 cups raw pepitas
4 gloves garlic
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon smoked paprika, divided
1 teaspoon chili powder, divided
1 teaspoon Himalayan pink salt
1 1/2 cups cooked chickpeas (or 1 can, drained and rinsed)
1/2 cup olive oil, plus more for drizzling
1 lemon, juiced
pita bread for serving

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease baking sheet or line with aluminum foil.
  2. Right on the pan add the pumpkin seeds (pepitas), 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika, 1/2 teaspoon chili powder, salt and pepper. Toss well with you hands. Add the garlic cloves to one side of the pan (leave them in their skin). Roast for about 15-25 minutes or until seeds are cooked and begin to lightly brown. Remove the pan every 10 minutes to stir the seeds and check for doneness. Remove from the oven, let cool 5 minutes and then peel the skin away from the garlic. If the garlic is not tender and fragrant when the seeds are done roasting, wrap them in foil and continue to roast until soft and roasted.
  3. Add the pumpkin seeds to a food processor and process until a smooth paste forms, scrap down the sides as needed. This took about 5 minutes. Once the pumpkin seeds form a paste, add the beans and garlic. Pulse and blend until combined and the beans begin to puree, about 2-3 minutes. With the processor still going, stream in olive oil, blending continuously for a few minutes (and scraping down the sides if needed) until as smooth as desired. Add the remaining, 1/2 teaspoon of chili powder and smoked paprika. Blend until combined add some pink salt and taste, adding more if desired. Add hummus to a bowl and drizzle with extra olive oil. Start dippin!

Recipe Adapted from The Half Baked Harvest.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange: Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Pumpkin Chili Recipe For A Cancer Free Lifestyle

Vegan Pumpkin Chili

By: Breast Cancer Yoga Staff.

Autumn is the time of year pumpkins decorate our front steps, eventually carved for Halloween jack-o-lanterns, and gracing the table as pumpkin pie usually once a year for Thanksgiving. After November this healthy anti-cancer food is often ignored, disappearing from our diet for another 11 months. Breast Cancer Authority Blog presents a pumpkin recipe that helps fight breast cancer, and is delicious too!

Canned pumpkin (not the same as pumpkin pie filling!) has many of the same benefits of fresh pumpkin, but as with most processed foods, not all the benefits, so use fresh if you can. When available use organic ingredients.

1 – bag of meat-free crumbles (such as Boca Ground Crumbles)**
1 – medium onion, chopped
1 – cup canned pumpkin (or squash)
1 – 28 oz. can diced stewed tomatoes
1- 15 oz. can kidney or black beans, drained & rinsed
1 – 12 oz. bottle of chili sauce
1-2 tablespoons chili powder
2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
1-1/2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon pepper

In a crock pot, combine all ingredients and slow cook on low for 3-4 hours.
On the stove in a soup pot, combine all ingredients and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer and for 1 hour.

Serve with your favorite chili toppings!

* if you like spicy chili, consider adding a touch of Chipotle peppers in adobo sauce or cayenne pepper.
** You can substitute lentils, bulgur wheat, or more beans for the crumbles.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

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