Sugar Free Chocolate Protein Truffle Recipe For A Cancer Diet

These protein truffles are an ideal alternative to regular high sugar and high-fat chocolate truffles. With 5g of protein per truffle and no sugar, it is a great way to consume protein for a  person who has no appetite but needs to consume proteins during cancer treatment. Always use organic ingredients when possible.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 scoops – Chocolate vegan protein powder (Alternative – any protein powder can be used with 2 tbsp – coco powder)
  • 2 Tbsp – Crunchy peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup – Almond milk
  • 2 Tbsp – Sweetener (agave nectar, fruit sweetened jam)
  • 10 Whole Hazelnuts
  • 2 Tbsp – Shredded coconut
  • 1/2 tsp. Himalayan Pink Salt

Directions

  1. In a bowl or food processor add the vegan protein, sweetener, salt and peanut butter and blend to make a thick mix.
  2. Add the almond milk a little at a time to make a thick dough.
  3. Take a teaspoonful of the dough at a time and flatten into a disk.
  4. Place a hazelnut in the center of the disk and roll the dough back into a ball leaving the nut in the middle.
  5. Roll the truffle ball in some shredded coconut and leave in the fridge for 10 minutes to set.

A healthy cancer diet is only one of several factors that can affect your health; exercise and stress management are just as important in improving your overall health and well-being.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer. We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

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Apple No Bake Protein Bar Recipe (Dairy & Sugar Free)

Dig these healthy No-Bake Apple Pie Protein Bars that taste like a dessert you can eat daily….multiple times. Not only do they only take 10 minutes to whip up, they are a one bowl wonder which is a no-mess, no fuss kind of snack. They have a soft, chewy and doughy texture. Not only do each bar pack at a hefty protein boost, they are also naturally gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free! Remember to always use organic ingredients when possible.

Ingredients
1. 2 cups gluten-free oat flour (For the paleo option, use 1 cup coconut flour)
2. ½ cup coconut flour, sifted (Can sub for almond or more oat flour)
3. ½ cup vanilla vegan or paleo friendly protein powder
4. 2 T granulated sweetener of choice (optional)*
5. 1 T cinnamon
6. 1 tsp mixed spice
7. 1 tsp nutmeg
8. 1/4 cup almond butter (can sub for any nut butter)
9. ½ cup liquid sweetner (agave syrup or brown rice syrup or maple syrup in the paleo version)
10. 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
11. 1 T + dairy free milk of choice**

Instructions
1. Line a large baking dish with greased paper and set aside.
2. In large mixing bowl, combine the flour, protein powder, granulated sweetener, cinnamon, nutmeg and mixed spice and mix well.
3. In a microwave-safe bowl, combine the nut butter and liquid sweetener and heat until melted. Pour the wet mixture into the dry and mix well. Add the unsweetened applesauce and mix until combined, the batter should be crumbly.
4. Using a spoon, add the dairy free milk of choice one spoonful at a time until a thick, firm batter is formed.
5. Transfer to lined baking dish and press firmly. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.

Notes
1. *You can omitted the sweetener if vegan protein powder is sweetened
2. ** Depending on the flour/protein powder combination, you may need more or less. I used up to 3/4 cup with the paleo version.
3. If your batter is too thin (brands VS homemade applesauce vary, add a dash more coconut flour until firmer).

Potato-Free Easy Baked Broccoli Tots

Welcome to the potato-free party, easy baked broccoli tots! This healy alternaive can be used for a cancer free lifestyle diet and always use organic ingredients when possible.

Ingredients

  • 2 medium heads broccoli, cut into florets
  • 1/4 small diced onions
  • 1/4 finely ground breadcrumbs
  • 1/4 nutritional yeast
  • 1 Flaxmeal egg replacement (1 tbsp. flaxmeal combined with 3 tbsp. alkaline water, combine and let sit for 5 minutes)

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a nonstick baking sheet with cooking spray.
  2. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the broccoli florets to the water and cook them just until fork tender, about 5 minutes.
  3. Thoroughly drain the florets and transfer them to a food processor.
  4. Pulse the broccoli for a few seconds just until the it breaks down into small pieces. (Do not overmix the broccoli or the mixture will be too wet to form into tots.)
  5. Measure out 3 packed cups of the broccoli and add it to a large bowl. Add the diced onion, breadcrumbs, egg and nutritional yeast and mix until thoroughly combined.
  6. Using your hands, portion out about 2 tablespoons of the mixture and mold it into a tater tot shape. Arrange the tots on the prepared baking sheet, spacing them about 1 inch apart.
  7. Bake the tots for about 20 minutes then flip them once and bake them an additional 10 to 15 minutes until crisped.
  8. Remove the tots from the oven and serve them with ketchup, vegan ranch dressing or hummus for dipping.

Recipe Notes:


The onion should to be cut small enough so that it’s not too chunky and can be easily mixed into the broccoli mixture.

The cheese can be omitted in order to make this recipe dairy-free.
The breadcrumbs can be swapped for finely crushed gluten-free pretzels, cereal or dried bread in order to make this recipe gluten-free.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

How Meat Stimulates Breast Cancer

In 1979, an epidemic of breast enlargement was noted in Italian children. Poultry or veal was suspected, given that estrogens may be fed to farm animals to accelerate their weight gain. After this episode, Europe banned the use of anabolic growth promoters in agriculture, and has banned the importation of American meat from animals injected with drugs like Zeranol, sold as Ralgro Magnum.

Zeranol is the one of the most potent known endocrine disruptors—100,000 times more estrogenic than the plastics chemical, BPA, for example. And Zeranol constitutes a special case among potential endocrine disruptors, because in contrast to all other estrogenic “endocrine-disrupting” chemicals, Zeranol is present in human food, because it’s deliberately used—in fact, designed to be a potent, persistent, estrogen, whereas the estrogenic properties of the other chemicals are accidental.

And if you drip blood from a cow that’s been implanted with the drug on human breast cancer cells in a petri dish, you can double the cancer growth rate. We don’t drink blood, though, but preliminary data also showed that muscle extracts, meat extracts, also stimulated breast cancer cell proliferation.

Furthermore, Zeranol may cause the transformation of normal breast cells into cancer cells in the first place. Zeranol-containing blood from implanted cattle was capable of transforming normal human breast cells into breast cancer cells within 21 days.

Obese women may be at greater risk of developing Zeranol-induced breast cancer, since they already have high levels of leptin, a hormone produced by fat cells, that can itself promote breast cancer growth. And Zeranol exposure can greatly enhance this growth-promoting action. This result also suggests that Zeranol may be more harmful to obese breast cancer patients than to normal weight breast cancer patients, in terms of breast cancer development.

In conclusion, because these anabolic growth promoters in meat production are, by far, the most potent hormones found in human food, we should really be testing people, especially children, before and after eating this meat. It amazes me that it hasn’t been done, and until it has, we have no idea what kind of threat they may pose—though the fact that Zeranol is as potent as estradiol—the primary sex steroid in women and DES—should concern us. DES is another synthetic estrogen marketed to pregnant women—all pregnant women until 1971, when it was shown to cause vaginal cancers in the daughters. But few know it was also used in meat.

In the absence of effective federal regulation, the meat industry uses hundreds of animal feed additives, with little or no concern about the carcinogenic and other toxic effects of dietary residues of these additives. Illustratively, after decades of misleading assurances of the safety of DES and its use as a growth-promoting animal feed additive, the United States finally banned its use some 40 years after it was first shown to be carcinogenic. The meat industry then promptly switched to other potentially carcinogenic additives, such as Zeranol.

When girls started dying from vaginal cancer, DES-treated meat was subsequently banned in Europe. However, misleading assurances, including the deliberate suppression of residue data, managed to delay a U.S. ban on DES in the meat supply for eight years.

Today, virtually the entire U.S. population consumes, without any warning, labeling, or information, unknown and unpredictable amounts of hormone residues in meat products over a lifetime. If all hormonal and other carcinogenic feed additives aren’t banned immediately, the least we could have is “explicit labeling requirements of the use and of [hormone] residue levels in all meat products, including milk and eggs.”

Doctor’s Note

Isn’t that amazing about the DES story? I had no idea it was used in meat production. Check out some of the other Big Pharma on Big Farms: Illegal Drugs in Chicken Feathers.

The most dangerous additive used in the meat industry is antibiotics, though. See, for example:

For more on what may be bad for the breast, check out:

And for what may be protective, see:

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

Scrumptious Lemon Icebox Pie That Is Vegan & Sugar Free

 Studies have found that sugar may fuel the growth of breast cancer so with that in mind if you or a loved one are in cancer treatment a sugar-free diet is recommended.  Your whole family will enjoy this summertime chilled dessert while maintaining a healthy breast cancer diet.  Also, use organic ingredients when possible.
Crust:
  • 1 cup almonds
  • 1/2 cup shredded unsweetened coconut
  • 3/4 cup dates pitted
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla bean powder or extract
  • pinch of pink salt
  • splash of water to help blend, if needed
Lemon Filling:
  • 2 cans coconut milk solid cream only
  • 1 medium zucchini peeled, grated & squeezed dry (roughly 3/4 cup)
  • 2 Tbs lemon zest from 2 large lemons, divided
  • 1/3 cup + 1 Tbs fresh lemon juice from 2 large lemons
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil melted
  • 1/2 cup pure agave
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • pinch of pink salt I used about 1/16 tsp
  • Extra lemons for zesting/slicing for garnish

To make the crust:

  1. Pulse crust ingredients in food processor until sticky crumbles form.
  2. Press into parchment lined 7″ springform pan.

To make the lemon filling:

  1. Add zucchini to a food processor with 1 Tb lemon zest and blend thoroughly.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients, except oil, and blend, scraping down the sides as needed.
  3. Stream in melted coconut oil with the processor running.
  4. Taste & adjust with more zest or sweetener, if needed.
  5. Pour filling over crust.
  6. Freeze for a about 3 hours, or until firm.
  7. Transfer to fridge for another hour or two, to make slicing easier.
  8. Garnish with more lemon zest, lemon slices or whipped coconut cream.
  9. chilled, or return to the freezer for a firmer, frozen treat. (see notes)

Recipe Notes

  • I use a 7″ springform pan. If you use a larger pan, your pie will be shorter. Or you can double the filling.
  • To get the cream from canned coconut milk: refrigerate 2 cans of coconut milk overnight.

  • The next day, carefully open and scoop out the solid cream that has hardened at the top of the can. Reserve the liquid for a smoothie!
  • Always buy full-fat coconut milk for whipped cream. I like Thai Kitchen organic.
  • This pie can be enjoyed frozen or chilled– both are delicious!
  • To enjoy chilled, store in the fridge (after the initial freezing to help solidify.)
  • To enjoy frozen, return your pie to the freezer after slicing and store in the freezer. (Pie will last several weeks this way)
  • If frozen solid, just set on the counter for 15 minutes or so to soften.

This ice box pie is the perfect treat to make for summer and would be amazing with a variety of different fruits – peaches and nectarines would be amazing! I hope you all love it, and will share with all of those that you love!

Recipe adapted from http://www.PrettyPies.com

Dawn - Breast Cancer Authority BlogAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors?

Soyfoods have become controversial in recent years,…even among health professionals,…exacerbated by misinformation found on the Internet.” Chief among the misconceptions is that soy foods promote breast cancer, because they contain a class of  phytoestrogen compounds called isoflavones. Since estrogens can promote breast cancer growth, it’s natural to assume phytoestrogens might too.

But, people don’t realize there are two types of estrogen receptors in the body—alpha and beta. And, unlike actual estrogen, soy phytoestrogens “preferentially bind to and activate [estrogen receptor beta]. This distinction is important, because the 2 [types of receptors] have different tissue distributions…and often function differently, and sometimes in opposite ways.” And, this appears to be the case in the breast, where beta activation has an anti-estrogenic effect, inhibiting the growth-promoting effects of actual estrogen—something we’ve known for more than ten years. There’s no excuse anymore.

The effects of estradiol, the primary human estrogen, on breast cells are completely opposite to those of soy phytoestrogens, which have antiproliferative effects on breast cancer cells, even at the low concentrations one gets in one’s bloodstream eating just a few servings of soy—which makes sense, given that after eating a cup of soybeans, the levels in our blood cause significant beta receptor activation.

So, where did this outdated notion that soy could increase breast cancer risk come from? The concern was “based largely on research that showed that [the main soy phytoestrogen] genistein stimulates the growth of mammary tumors in [a type of] mouse.” But, it turns out, we’re not actually mice. We metabolize soy isoflavones very differently from rodents. The same soy leads to 20 to 150 times higher levels in the bloodstream of rodents. The breast cancer mouse in question was 58 times higher. So, if you ate 58 cups of soybeans a day, you could get some significant alpha activation, too. But, thankfully, we’re not hairless athymic ovariectomized mice, and we don’t tend to eat 58 cups of soybeans a day.

At just a few servings of soy a day, with the excess beta activation, we would assume soy would actively help prevent breast cancer. And, indeed, “[s]oy intake during childhood, adolescence, and adult life were each associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer.” Those women who ate the most soy in their youth appear to grow up to have less than half the risk.

This may help explain why breast cancer rates are so much higher here than in Asia—yet, when Asians come over to the U.S. to start eating and living like Americans, their risk shoots right up.  For example, women in Connecticut—way at the top of the breast cancer risk heap—in their fifties have, like, ten times more breast cancer than women in their fifties living in Japan. But, it’s not just genetic, since when they move here, their breast cancer rates go up generation after generation, as they assimilate into our culture.

Are the anti-estrogenic effects of soy foods enough to actually change the course of the disease? We didn’t know, until the first human study on soy food intake and breast cancer survival was published in 2009 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, suggesting that “[a]mong women with breast cancer, soy food consumption was significantly associated with decreased risk of death and [breast cancer] recurrence.” Followed by another study, and then another, all with similar findings.

That was enough for the American Cancer Society, who brought together a wide range of cancer experts to offer nutrition guidelines for cancer survivors, to conclude that, if anything, soy foods should be beneficial. Since then, two additional studies have been published, for a total of five, and they all point in the same direction. Five out of five, tracking more than 10,000 breast cancer patients.

Pooling all the results, soy food intake after breast cancer diagnosis was associated with reduced mortality (meaning a longer lifespan) and reduced recurrence—so, less likely the cancer comes back. Anyone who says otherwise hasn’t cracked a journal open in seven years.

And, this improved survival was for both women with estrogen receptor negative tumors and estrogen receptor positive tumors, and for both younger women, and for older women. Pass the edamame.

Doctor’s Note

This is probably the same reason flax seeds are so protective. See Flax Seeds & Breast Cancer Survival: Epidemiological Evidence and Flax Seeds & Breast Cancer Survival: Clinical Evidence.

What about women who carry breast cancer genes? I touched on that in BRCA Breast Cancer Genes & Soy, and it’s the topic of my next video, Should Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer Avoid Soy?

What about genetically modified soy? I made a video abut that too; see GMO Soy & Breast Cancer.

Who Shouldn’t Eat Soy? Glad you asked. Watch that video too! 🙂

Not all phytoestrogens may be protective, though. See The Most Potent Phytoestrogen is in Beer and What are the Effects of the Hops Phytoestrogen in Beer?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

Nice & Easy Beet Salad Recipe

A great source of iron, vitamins and JOY! Beets are delicious and healthy! They will clean your liver and kidneys, supply great amount of nutrients and leave you happy 🙂

What you need:

  • 5-6 beets, peeled, cooked until fork-tender and cut to cubes (or sliced. Depends of how you like it to look like!)
  • 1 large purple onion, peeled and sliced
  • 2 spoons olive oil
  • Pink Himalayan Salt to taste
  • 1 spoon maple syrup 

What to do:

Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and leave in the fridge for at least 6 hours before serving. 

Enjoy!

To get more of these great recipes visit Neeva’s website  The Innergy

How to Block Breast Cancer’s Estrogen-Producing Enzymes

The vast majority of breast cancers start out “hormone-dependent,” meaning the primary human estrogen, called “estradiol plays a crucial role in [breast cancer] development and progression.” That’s one of the reasons why soy food consumption appears so protective against breast cancer—because soy phytoestrogens, like genistein, act as estrogen-blockers. They block the binding of estrogens, like estradiol, to breast cancer cells.

But, wait a second. “The majority of breast cancers occur [after menopause], when the ovaries have [stopped producing estrogen].” What’s the point of eating estrogen blockers if there’s no estrogen to block? It turns out the breast cancer tumors themselves produce their own estrogen from scratch to fuel their own growth.

Estrogens may be formed in breast tumors by multiple pathways. The breast cancer takes cholesterol, and, using the aromatase enzyme, or two hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, produces its own estrogen.

So, there’s two ways to stop breast cancer. One is to use “antiestrogens,” estrogen-blockers, like the soy phytoestrogens, or “the anti-estrogen [drug] tamoxifen…However, another way to block estradiol is by using anti-enzymes” to prevent the breast cancer from making all the estrogen in the first place.

And, indeed, there are a variety of anti-aromatase drugs in current use. In fact, inhibiting the estrogen production has been shown to be “more effective” than just trying to block the effects of the estrogen—”suggesting that the inhibition of estrogen synthesis is clinically very important for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer.” It turns out soy phytoestrogens can do both.

Using ovary cells taken from women undergoing in vitro fertilization, soy phytoestrogens were found to reduce the expression of the aromatase enzyme. What about in breast cancer cells, though? Breast cancer cells, too—not only suppressing aromatase activity, but the other estrogen-producing enzyme, too.

But, this is in a petri dish. Does soy suppress estrogen production in people too Well, circulating estrogen levels appear significantly lower in Japanese women than American white women. And, Japan does have the highest per capita soy food consumption. But, you don’t know it’s the soy until you put it to the test. Japanese women were randomized to add soymilk to their diet—or not—for a few months. Estrogen levels did seem to drop about a quarter in the soymilk-supplemented group. Interestingly, when they tried the same experiment in men, they got similar results: a significant drop in female hormone levels, with no change in testosterone levels.

These results, though, are in Japanese men and women that were already consuming soy in their baseline diet. So, it’s really just looking at “higher versus lower…soy intake.”

What happens if you give soymilk to women in Texas? Circulating estrogen levels cut in half. Since increased estrogen levels are a “[marker] for high risk for breast cancer,” the effectiveness of soy to reduce estrogen levels may help explain why Chinese and Japanese women have such low rates of breast cancer.

And, what was truly remarkable is that estrogen levels stayed down a month or two, even after they stopped drinking it. This suggests you don’t have to consume soy every day to have the cancer-protective benefit.

Doctor’s Note

Wait, soy protects against breast cancer? Yes, in study after study after study. Even in women at high risk? See BRCA Breast Cancer Genes & Soy.

Even if you already have breast cancer? See Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors?

Even GMO soy? See GMO Soy & Breast Cancer.

Okay, then, Who Shouldn’t Eat Soy? Watch that video too! 🙂

What else can we do to decrease breast cancer risk? See:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

Amazing Banana & Almond Milk Protein Shake

 I thought I tried them all: all kinds of fruit and vegetable combinations in shakes and smoothies. So I thought. And then one day I sit in an amazing vegan raw restaurant in Toronto,“Rawlicious”, enjoying all kinds of salads and raw sandwiches (super yummy! Great place!) when a kind waitress  asking me if I’d like to try their new almond shake. I’m the last person on earth that will say no to any kind of tasting in a good vegan restaurant, and so I got this fabulous shake to my table. It had this delicious taste that makes you run and beg for the recipe… and so I did!

After trying this at home I made my own little changes, like adding the ground coriander seeds and the pumpkin seeds (after all, I try to add some good health into every recipe).

Here is the recipe of the best almond banana shake, for the benefit of all man kind.

What you need:

  • 1 cup almond milk (no advertising here, but I like “SILK” brand the best. Unless, of course, you make your own almond milk at home, which is the best).
  • 1 ripe banana (no ripe – no good).
  • Optional: 1 spoon raw pumpkin seeds (huge natural, healthy iron blast!).
  • 1 tbs grounded cinnamon.
  • 1 tbs grounded coriander seeds.
  • Optional for extra sweetness: 1 madjul date. If you like it very sweet.

What to do:

Blend it all in a blender.  When ready, you may sprinkle some cinnamon on top for garnish. Share with the special people in your life!

Enjoy!

To get more of these great recipes visit Neeva’s website  The Innergy

How To Have A High Calorie Healthy Breakfast (Dairy & Sugar Free)

How to have over a 1,000 calories for breakfast and feel great!! Before taking your morning walk or beginning your exercise routine try the following:

Before Exercise Routine:

  • 1 banana
  • 2 apples

Slice organic fruit and eat.

After Exercise Routine:

  • 1 mango
  • 2 bananas
  • 2 tbs chia seeds
  • 1 cup almond milk

Blend all organic ingredients together and drink.

It’s just 10 am and I have tons of great energy and a big smile on my face!

Enjoy!

To get more of these great recipes visit Neeva’s website  The Innergy

 

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