Vegetables Versus Breast Cancer

Mushrooms For Breast Cancer PreventionBy: By: Dr. Michael Greger, Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

What new developments are there are in the battle against breast cancer? Well, most breast tumors are estrogen receptor positive, meaning they respond to estrogen; estrogen makes them grow. The problem for tumors in postmenopasal women is that there isn’t much estrogen around, unless of course you take it in a drug like pre-mar-in, made from pregnant mare urine, found not to affect the quality of women’s lives, just the quantity, increasing the risk of strokes heart attacks blood clots and, breast cancer.

Thankfully millions of women stopped taking it in 2002, and we saw a nice dip in breast cancer rates, but unfortunately, those rates have since stagnated. Hundreds of thousands of American women continue every year to get that dreaded diagnosis. So what next?

Well, with no estrogen around, many breast tumors devise a nefarious plan, they’ll just make their own. 70% of breast cancer cells synthesize estrogen themselves using an enzyme called aromatase, which converts testosterone to estrogen, blue to pink. And so drug companies have produced a number of aromatase inhibitor drugs which are used as chemotherapy agents. Of course by the time you’re on chemo it can be too late, so researchers started screening hundreds of natural dietary components in hopes of finding something that targets this enzyme.

To do this, you need a lot of human tissue—where you going to get it from? To study skin, for example, researchers use discarded human foreskins. They’re just being thrown away might as well use them. Where are you going to get discarded female tissue, though? Placentas. Human placentas. So they got a bunch of women to donate their placentas after giving birth to further this critical line of research.

After years of searching, they found seven vegetables with significant anti-aromatase activity. And here they are,. Seven different vegetables, dropping aromatase activity about 20%, except for this one. That’s like a 60, 65% drop inhibition. ]Which one was it? bell pepper, broccoli, carrots, celery , green onions, mushrooms, or spinach. Not scallions, not celery, not carrots, not peppers, nor broccoli—that would have been my guess, not spinach, but: Mushrooms.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D. – Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Breast Cancer Prevention: Which Mushroom Is Best?

Research Shows Breast Cancer Benefits of MushroomsBy: Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker.

In this landmark study to find out which vegetable was best at suppressing the activity of the enzyme used by breast cancer cells to undermine our defenses, mushrooms came out number 1, but this was just for plain white mushrooms. If that’s how regular mushrooms roll, then think how good the exotic varieties may do.

So they put them to the test, comparing regular mushrooms to woodear, crimini, oyster mushrooms, Italian brown, enoki, button mushrooms, which are just baby versions of regular white mushrooms, stuffing mushrooms, which are just big white mushrooms, shiitake, chanterelle, and Portobello.

We already know what this one is here. Remember, 60- to 65% drop? White mushrooms, the original. Most of these other mushrooms are stuck up here in celery carrot-land. But one beat our regular fun-guy. Which one do you think it was?

Woodear, crimini, oyster, Italian brown, enoki, button, stuffing, shiitake, chanterelle, or Portobello?

I never would have guessed this one. Better than plain white mushrooms? Big plain white mushrooms!

In conclusion, these studies suggest that daily intake of the common white button mushroom may have a significant cancer preventive effect with regard to breast cancer development. White button mushrooms are relatively inexpensive and readily available in markets across the United States, and therefore are a feasible addition to any dietary plan.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.
Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

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