The Chromosomal Link Between Breast Cancer Risk and Obesity Found!

A recent study has found the chromosomal link that helps reduce or increase the risk for breast cancer through a mechanism that controls the weight of the woman.

Recently, research was conducted to study the link between weight loss, body fat and the length of a certain chromosome in the women with breast cancer.

It is well documented that maintaining a healthy weight through regular exercises, and a healthy diet are the keys to cancer prevention and management. However, the exact mechanism through which these factors work was not fully known.

Researchers at the Yale Cancer Center have found an explanation for this link in the small ends of a chromosome called telomeres. These findings will be presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium on December 11, 2015.

The research was based on a previously published study conducted at the Yale called LEAN that examined how weight loss through healthy lifestyle changes was linked with the telomere length in the breast cancer survivors who enrolled in a weight-loss program. It was found that the telomeres shortened with each cell division and were also associated with faster aging and an increased risk of mortality in the breast cancer patients.

The Yale study further explored the link between telomere length and weight loss in the breast cancer survivors. The research concluded that telomeres in the breast cancer survivors who had lost weight through regular exercise and a healthy diet were slower to shorten.

“It was also found that the telomere shortening was reversed in some cases when the women followed a healthy diet and lost weight,” said the first author of the study, Dr. Tara Sanft, the assistant professor of medical oncology.

“The results indicate that a higher body fat level could be associated with a shorter telomere length. Also, weight loss was strongly associated with an increase in the length of the telomere,” Sanft said. “This indicates that the length of telomere could be a mechanism through which the relationship between breast cancer risk and mortality and obesity is mediated.”

The senior author of the study, Melinda Irwin, said, “A growing body of scientific research linking lifestyle factors like exercising and maintaining a healthy weight with an improved breast cancer treatment success and survival is compelling.”

“With the findings of exercise and weight loss improving the mechanisms associated with breast cancer mortality and treatment success, a shift in the management of breast cancer patients that includes increased access to lifestyle behavioral counseling is expected,” Irwin said.

Meanwhile, new guidelines have been recommended by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Cancer Society. The women who have undergone lumpectomy for the removal of a cancerous lesion in the breast or mastectomy are advised to have regular follow ups with annual mammograms. Mammograms are not required for the women who have undergone reconstruction of the breasts. MRIs are also not recommended except in cases of high-risk factors.

Following these guidelines and maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise can improve the chances of survival of breast cancer patients substantially.

Find more about “Alternative ways of cancer treatment” for breast cancer on our website.

References:

1. Study links body fat, weight loss, and chromosome length in breast cancer patients
2. New follow-up care guidelines released for breast cancer survivors
3. Yale study explores breast cancer/weight loss link

Featured Photo Source: Ken Borsuk / Hearst Connecticut Media

Dr. Adem Gunes

Dr. Adem Gunes has built the world’s largest database of scientifically tested natural substances with proven effects in cancer treatments. In 2009, he was appointed as the Chief Physician of ProLife Clinic in Innsbruck, Austria, and played a key role in the establishment of the research laboratory. He is also the co-founder of the first Austrian hyperthermia center. Now, Dr. Adem works closely with cancer patients from around the world (including Germany, Thailand, Dubai) to recommend them a complementary cancer clinic or to create a personalized care plan for patients to follow at

Advertisements

Comfort Slings Help Relieve Soreness and Abrasion Beneath the Breasts

Breast Cancer Sling For Radiation TherapyBy Margot Malin, Founder of Lots To Live For, Inc.
Patients who are undergoing radiation therapy on the underside of their breasts may develop radiation dermatitis, painful sores, and even weepy lesions in the skin folds beneath their breasts. The inflammation can be worsened by excessive perspiration and the chafing resulting from skin-to-skin contact. Once these side effects occur the patient experiences significant discomfort. They tend to heal very slowly.

We’d like to introduce you to a new product called the Breast Comfort Sling which can help improve comfort and prevent the continuing abrasion or fold over effect. The BreastComfort Sling allows the breast to rest on a soft cushion giving freer air circulation while wicking away perspiration to keep the sore area dry. The straps are adjustable so there is no pressure on the neck or shoulder, or on the sore areas beneath the breast. The cushion provides a comfort barrier between the breast and the skin beneath it to prevent excessive chafing, and the antimicrobial material discourages bacteria growth.Breast Cancer Comfort Sling on Breast Cancer Authority BlogThe most effective way for women who are receiving radiation therapy to the underside of the breast to minimize excessive side effects to the skin is to begin wearing the BreastComfort Single Sling from the beginning of treatment. However, the wearing the sling can be initiated at any time during treatment, or even after treatment to reduce lingering radiation dermatitis or other skin discomfort. Wearing the sling as many hours as possible throughout the day, especially when sleeping, is most effective.

The BreastComfort Sling is designed to be worn without a bra. Therefore, if patients want to wear a bra during the day, perhaps at work or when “out and about”, the BreastComfort Strapless Cushioned Bra Inserts are recommended. The pad (bra insert), with no straps, is tucked underneath the breast, inside the bra cup, offering both comfort to sore breasts throughout the day, and further protection from rubbing against the bra and underwires. Wearing a bra with a band beneath the underwire is preferable to prevent the cushion from slipping out of place. (Some women may find it necessary to purchase a larger bra or cup size when wearing the BreastComfort Strapless Cushioned Bra Inserts).

The fabric for the BreastComfort Slings and Pads was specially selected because it is very soft and has both wicking and antimicrobial qualities. The straps are soft enough to be comfortable yet firm enough to hold their shape when worn across the shoulders. The slings stay in place, yet they are loose enough to avoid pressure and constriction across the neck and under the breast.

BreastComfort Slings and Pads were developed by Elizabeth Silver during her radiation oncology treatment and they proved so effective that her radiologist and oncologist were amazed at the excellent condition of her skin during her treatment. In fact, it was they who recommended that she begin to market the slings so that more women could benefit from the relief they provided.

To learn more about the BreastComfort Sling, and BreastComfort Cushioned Bra Insert Pads click HERE.

Related Article:

About Margot Malin: Intellectually cMargot Malinurious and fiercely independent, Margot Malin has a passion for knowledge.  After receiving her MBA from The Wharton School, she launched her career by analyzing and evaluating businesses.  In 2002 she embarked on the “creative reinvention” phase of her career with the intention of “giving back”. Margot founded Lots To Live For, Inc., an internet retailer that sells carefully selected products to reduce and relieve the uncomfortable and unpleasant side effects caused by chemotherapy and radiation.

%d bloggers like this: