Delicious & Healthy Mediterranean Roasted Chickpea Wrap

This simple and delicious Mediterranean inspired roasted chickpea wrap with refreshing tzatziki a cucumber vegan yogurt sauce comes from Susan at LiveLeanEat.com . We at Breast Cancer Yoga made this recipe and give it two thumbs up!

Ingredients
• 1 15 oz can chickpeas 425 g, 1 ½ cup soaked chickpeas if starting from dry, drained and rinsed
• 1 Tbsp olive oil 15 mL
• 1 Tbsp paprika* 7 g
• 1 tsp ground black pepper 3 g
• 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper 1.5 g
• 1/4 tsp salt 1.5 g
• 4 pita flatbread
• 1 cup tzatziki  (vegan plain yogurt & cucumber sauce)
• 1/4 red onion cut into strips
• 2 lettuce leaves roughly chopped
• 1 tomato sliced

Directions
1. Pat dry chickpeas with paper towel, removing any skins that may come off.
2. Gently toss chickpeas with oil, paprika, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and salt.
3. Spread chickpeas onto a greased rimmed baking sheet and roast at 400 degrees F (200 C) for about 20 minutes, until lightly browned but not hard.
4. Spread some tzatziki onto one side of the pita, then sprinkle in ¼ of the chickpeas and add veggies. Fold in half and enjoy!
Notes
• *If you don’t like spicy foods, half the amount paprika, black pepper, and cayenne pepper. Taste a chickpeas before baking and adjust flavors as needed.
• If your pita breads crack when you fold them, cover them with a moist paper towel and microwave for 20 to 30 seconds. Assemble your sandwich immediately after microwaveing.
• Wanna bring these to lunch? Try them in meal prep-able form!

A healthy diet is only one of several factors that can affect the immune system; exercise and stress management are just as important in improving your overall health and well-being.

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DawnBradford Co-Founder of Breast Cancer YogaAbout Dawn Bradford Lange: Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Sweet Potato Proteins vs. Cancer

Learn About Sweet Potatoes As A Cancer Fighting FoodSweet potatoes can be considered a superfood. They are one of the healthiest and cheapest vegetables on the planet. (And one day, perhaps, even off the planet, as NASA has chosen the sweet potato for space missions.) A study out of the University of Washington aimed to identify which vegetables provided the most nutrients per dollar. In my video, Anti-Cancer Potential of Sweet Potato Proteins, you can see a graph of affordability versus nutrition for different foods. The healthiest foods, like dark green leafy vegetables, may also be the cheapest, and the highest nutrient-rich food scores per dollar were obtained for sweet potatoes.

Sweet potatoes are not just packed with nutrition but may also have special cancer-fighting properties. In 1931, a unique protein was discovered in sweet potatoes. It turns out that 80% of the protein in sweet potatoes is a type of protease inhibitor with potential anticancer effects. These proteins were originally tested against leukemia and appeared to suppress the growth of leukemia cells in a petri dish.

But how would a sweet potato protein ever get into our bloodstream? As soon as most proteins hit our stomach, they start getting digested. To get around the digestion issue, researchers tried sweet potato protein against tongue cancer cells (sweet potato proteins certainly come in contact with our mouth!). Tongue cancer is often treated with chemotherapy, and most of the chemo drugs for tongue cancer have adverse effects; so, it is indispensable for us to find other therapeutic strategies. Sweet potato protein rapidly diminished viability of the cancer in vitro within a matter of days, leading the researchers to propose that sweet potatoes may be useful for human tongue cancer. But could they possibly help with other cancers as well?

Remarkably, this special class of proteins doesn’t just survive digestion, but may also be absorbed into the bloodstream intact (in at least two of the nine women with advanced cervical cancer researchers tried giving them to).

Most recently, sweet potato proteins were tried on colorectal cancer cells, one of our most common and deadly cancers. Normally, we just surgically remove the colon, but that only works in the early stages since there are often “micrometastases” outside the colon that can subsequently lead to cancer recurrence and death; so, we’ve been searching for anti-metastatic agents. Not only does sweet potato protein slow down the growth of colon cancer cells, but it may also decrease cancer cell migration and invasion.

Sweet potato consumption has also been associated with lower gallbladder cancer rates, but it has never been directly put to the test, but what’s the downside?

Sweet potatoes are one of my favorite snacks. During the harsh Boston winters during my medical training, I used to put two freshly microwaved sweet potatoes in my coat pockets as natural hand-warmers. When they cooled down, my hand-warmers became instant healthy snacks!

More videos on getting the most nutrition for one’s dollar:

What other vegetables might contain cancer fighting properties? See #1 AntiCancer Vegetable.

Are sweet potatoes best steamed? Should we eat the skin? Find out in my video: Best Way to Cook Sweet Potatoes.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Featured Photo Source: EatToBeat.org

Arsenic in Chicken

Arsenic In Chicken - Breast Cancer Authority BlogBy: Micheal Greger, MD, Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Arsenic is bad stuff—no argument, but most of the arsenic in the American diet comes not from rice; more than three quarters comes from animal products. Beef, milk, pork, hot dogs, eggs, and… chicken.

Purdue is the most contaminated. One bucket of American fast food chicken may exceed the EPA safety limit for arsenic in a glass of drinking water by 2000%.

How did it get there? The poultry industry fed it to them. Two million pounds of arsenic compounds are fed to chickens every year in the United States, and about 85 tons fed to pigs. Here’s the list of arsenic-containing feed additives approved by the FDA.

But why would the industry do that? Why do we feed millions of pounds of arsenic compounds to chickens every year. Here’s one of the chemical company ads: “Livestock and profits growing healthy together.” Approved by the FDA to increase the rate of weight gain. When you cram tens of thousands of birds into filthy football field-sized sheds to lie beak to beak in their own waste they become so heavily infested with internal parasites that adding arsenic to the feed to poison the bugs can result in a dramatic increase in growth rates. It’s also approved for use to “improve pigmentation.” Arsenic can give the carcass a pinkish tinge, which consumers prefer.

So the industry gets more profit; the consumers get the pink—what’s the downside? Landmark review in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences last year out of Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. What are the public health consequences of extra dietary arsenic? extra cancer risk, heart disease, diabetes, neuropathy, and neurocognitive deficits in children, not something to crow about.

Doctor’s Note

Check out
How Many Cancers Have Been Caused by Arsenic-Laced Chicken?
to learn more about this issue.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Breast Cancer Survival Vegetable

Breast Cancer Survival VegetableBy: Dr. Michael Greger, Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

A half million Americans are expected to die this year from cancer, equal to 5 jumbo jets crashing… every day. The number of Americans who die from cancer each year is more than all those who have died in all US wars combined. And this happens every single year.

After a cancer diagnosis people tend to clean up their diets. About a third to a half of breast cancer patients, for example, make healthy dietary changes following diagnosis, such as increasing in fruit and vegetable consumption and decreasing meat, fat and sugar intakes. Does it actually help that late in the game? Well, the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living Study was undertaken in few thousands breast cancer survivors to determine if a plant- based, low-fat, high-fiber diet could influence breast cancer recurrence rates and survival.

Previously they famously reported that simple changes—5 or more servings fruits and veggies a day and just like walking 30 minutes a day 6 days a week was associated with a significant survival advantage, cutting risk nearly in half. Note I said fruits and veggies and exercise. Here’s the proportion of women with breast cancer surviving 9 years in the study if they had low fruit and vegetable consumption and low physical activity, or high in one and low in the other. But here’s the survival curve, of those high in both.

And it worked just as well in women with estrogen receptor negative tumors, which normally have twice the mortality… unless, you eat a few fruits and veggies, and taking a few strolls. The “high” should really be in quotes, I mean you could eat 5 servings in a single meal and certainly walk more than like 2 miles a day.

Imagine, for a second, you have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Imagine sitting in that chair, in the doctor’s office, as your doctor gives you the news… But, there’s a new experimental treatment that can cut your chances of dying in the next few years from like 16% down to just 4%. To quadruple their survival rate many women would re-mortgage their homes to fly to some quack clinic in Mexico, would lose all their hair to chemo, but most, apparently, couldn’t stand the thought of eating broccoli.

And indeed that’s what the latest report from the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living Study found, fruits and vegetables may be good, but cruciferous vegetables may be better. For women on tamoxifen, for example, if one of their 5 daily servings of fruits and veggies was broccoli or cauliflower/collards/cabbage or kale, the risk of cancer recurrence may be cut in half.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.
Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Is a Neutropenic Diet Necessary for Cancer Patients?

Is a Neutropenic Diet Necessary for Cancer Patients?By: By: Dr. Michael Greger, Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Back in the 1960s, a patient isolator unit was developed for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Because our immune system cells are often caught in the friendly fire, up to 50% of cancer patients died of infections before they could even complete the chemo, because their immune systems had become so compromised. So, they developed this bubble boy contraption where they shave you, dip you in disinfectant, rinse you off with alcohol, antibiotic ointment in every orifice, and a rotating regimen of a dozen of the most powerful antibiotics we had. Procedures were performed through plastic sleeves and everything in and out had to be sterilized and pass through airlocks, and so, no fresh fruits and vegetables.

People went crazy cooped up in the things, with 38% of people starting to hallucinate. Fifteen years later the results were in; it simply didn’t work. People were still dying at the same rate, so the whole thing was scrapped, except the diet. The air locks and alcohol baths were abandoned, but they continued to make sure no one got to eat a salad. Neutrophils are our front line of defense white blood cells, and when we don’t have enough, we’re called neutropenic, immunocompromised, so we’re put on a neutropenic diet, no fresh fruits and vegetables. The only thing is that there’s a striking lack of evidence that such a diet actually helps.

Ironically, the neutropenic diet is the one component that’s still practiced, yet has the least evidence supporting its use. Their rationale was like look, there’s bacteria on salads, bacteria cause infections, immunocompromised patients are at risk for infections and so no salad, and we’re glad there’s no studies on it because it could be way too risky to give a cancer patient a salad. So its continued use seems to be based on a ‘‘better safe than sorry’’ philosophy.

The problem is kids diagnosed with cancer come in already low in dietary antioxidants, the last thing you’d think you’d want to say is no fresh fruit. So in addition to the lack of clinical evidence for this diet, there may be some drawbacks—maybe restriction of fruits and vegetables may increase the risk of infection, compromise their nutritional status.

So are neutropenic diets for cancer patients reasonable prudence or clinical superstition? A resurgence of research started during the 90s, when the need to support clinical practice with, wait for it, evidence, became increasingly important—what a concept.

In other words, you don’t know until you put it to the test. Three randomized controlled trials were published, and none supported the neutropenic diet. This was the biggest—an all cooked diet versus one that allowed raw fruit and veggies, and there was no difference in infection and death rates.

As a result of the study, the principal investigator at the MD Anderson Cancer Center described how their practice has changed and now everyone is allowed to eat their vegetables, a far cry from “please don’t eat the salads” 31 years earlier.

Today, neither the FDA nor the CDC support the neutropenic diet nor does the American Cancer Society. The real dangers are the pathologic food poisoning bacteria like Campylobacter, salmonella, E. coli. So you still have to keep people away from risky foods like undercooked eggs, meat, dairy and sprouts. Maybe there’s no longer even a debate, yet many institutions continue to tell cancer patients they shouldn’t eat fresh fruits and veggies. According to the latest survey, more than half of pediatric cancer doctors continue to prescribe these diets, though it’s quite variable even among those at the same institution.

Why are doctors still reluctant to move away from the neutropenic diet? There are several reasons why doctors may be hesitant to incorporate evidence-based medicine into the practice. They have limited time to review the literature. They’d like to dig deep into studies but they simply don’t have the time to look into the evidence. That’s what Nutritionfacts.org is for.

Bone marrow transplants are the final frontier. Sometimes it’s your immune system itself that is cancerous—leukemia, lymphoma, and so the immune system is wiped out on purpose to rebuild from scratch, and so inherent in the procedure is a profound immunodeficiency for which a neutropenic diet is often recommended, but had never been tested, until now. Not only did it not work, a strict neutropenic diet was actually associated with an increased risk for infection, maybe because you didn’t have the good bugs from fruits and vegetables crowding out the bad guys in the gut. Not only was the neutropenic diet not beneficial but there was a suggestion that it could be potentially harmful. It would not be the first time that an intervention strategy made good theoretical sense, but ultimately was ineffective when put to the test.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D. – Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Photo Source: MedicalNewsToday

How Many Glasses of Water Should We Drink a Day?

Learn How Many Glasses Of Water A Day You NeedBy: Dr. Michael Greger, Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

More than 2000 years ago Hippocrates c (460–377 BC) said ‘If we could give every individual the right amount of nourishment and exercise, not too little and not too much, we would have found the safest way to health’. What does that mean when it comes to water? Water has been described as a neglected, unappreciated and under researched subject, but a lot of the papers extolling the need for proper hydration are funded by the bottled water industry. Turns out the often quoted ‘drink at least eight glasses of water a day’ has little underpinning scientific evidence.

Where did they come up with that then? The recommendation was traced back to this 1921 paper, in which the author measured his own pee and sweat and determined we lose about 3% of our body weight in water a day, which comes out to be about 8 cups. Consequently, for the longest time, water requirement guidelines for humanity were based on just one person.

But now there’s evidence suggesting not drinking enough may be associated with falls and fractures, heat stroke, heart disease, lung disorders, kidney disease, kidney stones, bladder and colon cancer, urinary tract infections, constipation, dry mouth, cavities, decreased immune function and cataract formation.

The problem with many of these studies, though, is that low water intake is associated with several unhealthy behaviors, such as low fruit and vegetable intake, more fast-food, less shopping at farmers markets. And think about it—who drinks lots of water? Those that exercise a lot, no wonder they have lower disease rates.

Only large and expensive randomized trials could settle these questions definitively. But given that water cannot be patented, such trials seem unlikely. So we’re left with studies that link disease with low water intake, but are people sick because they drink less, or are they drinking less because they’re sick? There have been a few large prospective studies in which fluid intake is measured before disease develops. For example, a Harvard study of 48,000 men found that the risk of bladder cancer decreased by 7 percent for every extra daily cup of fluid one drinks. So a high intake of water—like 8 cups a day, 8 times 7, may reduce the risk of bladder cancer by about 50 percent, potentially saving thousands of lives.

The accompanying editorial commented that strategies to prevent the most prevalent cancers in the West are remarkably straightforward in principle. To prevent lung cancer, quit smoking; to prevent breast cancer, maintain your ideal body weight and exercise; and to prevent skin cancer, stay out of the sun. Now comes this seemingly simple way to reduce the risk of bladder cancer: drink more fluids.

This is probably the best evidence we have for a cut off. 20,000 men and women in the Adventist Health Study—about half vegetarian, so they were also getting extra water by eating more fruits and vegetables, and those drinking 5 or more glasses of water a day had about half the risk of dying from heart disease compared to those who drank 2 or fewer glasses a day, And like the Harvard study, this protection was after controlling for other factors such as diet and exercise, so they suggest it was the water itself, perhaps by lowering blood viscosity, or thickness.

So based on all the best evidence to date, authorities from Europe, the U.S. Institute of Medicine, and the World Health Organization recommend between 2 to 2.7 liters of water a day for women. That’s 8 to 11 cups a day for women, and 10 to 15 cups a day for men. Now but that’s water from all sources, not just beverages, and we get about a liter from food and the water our body actually makes, and so these translate into a recommendation for women to drink 4 to 7 cups of water a day and men, 6 to 11 cups, assuming only moderate physical activity at moderate ambient temperatures.

We can also get water from all the other drinks we consume, including caffeinated drinks, with the exception of stronger alcoholic drinks like wines and spirits. Beer can leave you with more water than you started with, but wine actively dehydrates you. Note, though, in the cancer and heart disease studies I mentioned, the benefits were only found with increased water consumption, not other beverages, so unless you have conditions like heart or kidney failure, women should drink 4 to 7 cups of water a day and men should drink 6 to 11.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.
Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

 

Cranberry, Lemon & Walnut Vegan Cheese Balls

Cranberry, Lemon & Walnut Vegan Cheese Balls For A Breast Cancer DietAfter sharing with the breast cancer community  Micheal Greger, MD’s post Which Fruit Fights Cancer Better? we wanted to follow up with a recipe that included the top fruits that slow cancer cell growth. If you didn’t get a chance to read this researched based article the two best fruits are cranberries and lemons along walnuts which will be featured this week.

Recipe Author: Cara of Fork & Beans
Serves: 4
Ingredients

  • 1 c. raw cashews, soaked 2+ hours, drained
  • 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (use refined if you don’t like the coconut flavor)
  • Juice of ½ lemon (or 2 tsp. apple cider vinegar)
  • ¼ tsp. sea salt
  • ⅓ c. dried cranberries, chopped
  • ¾ c. walnuts, chopped
  • 2 pieces of plastic wrap
  • 1 bowl

Instructions

  1. Place the cashews, coconut oil, wine, lemon juice and salt into a high-speed blender and begin to mix until smooth. Add 1 tablespoon of water at a time if it is too thick to blend. You shouldn’t need more than 2 Tbsp. of water most likely.
  2. Add the cranberries and only ¼ c. of the walnuts to roughly blend for a couple of seconds.
  3. Line a bowl with plastic wrap as pictured above and spoon the cheese sauce inside. Wrap the top up securely and place in the freezer for 1 hours until it begins to set.
  4. Take the cheese out of the plastic wrap and in a shallow bowl place the remaining ½ c. chopped walnuts in and gently roll the cheese ball around until it is completely covered in walnuts. Wrap in a clean piece of plastic wrap, placing it back in the bowl and into the freezer for another hour.

cara (2) Native of Los Angeles, Cara is the crazy, chocolate-filled woman behind Fork & Beans. On a mission to recreate every treat known to mankind, she has every intention of making them gluten, egg, and dairy-free. Oh, and super tasty too. From a range of Girl Scout Cookies, homemade candy bars, to a collection of childhood favorite snacks–nothing is off-limits. You can follow Fork & Beans on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram. You can also pre-order the upcoming published cookbook Decadent Gluten-free Vegan Baking here.

Photo Source

Which Fruit Fights Cancer Better?

Cranberries for Breast Cancer PreventionBy: Dr. Michael Greger, Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

There are many ways to compare the healthfulness of different foods. One can compare nutrient content, for example. So if you were interested in antioxidants you might compare vitamin C levels. If you did that with our two most popular fruits, apples and bananas, based on vitamin C content bananas would appear twice as healthy, 10 mg in a banana compared to only 5mg in an apple. But vitamin C is just one of thousands of different phytonutrients in fruits and vegetables. Turns out the vitamin C in apples accounts for less than 1% of an apple’s total antioxidant activity.

Here’s the total antioxidant content of a red delicious apple. Here’s how much the vitamin C in the apple contributes. You can hardly even see it. Even though there’s only about 5mg of vitamin C in a small apple, it has the antioxidant equivalent of 1500 mg of vitamin C. I’ve reviewed before how taking that much vitamin C straight in a supplement may actually have a pro-oxidant effect and cause DNA damage, but you can get three times that antioxidant power eating an apple, without the adverse effects.

Of course there’s more than just vitamin C in bananas too. In fact I was surprised to see this study out of Harvard suggesting that not only blueberries and strawberries, but bananas was a significant source of anthocyanins, the red/blue/violet phytonutrients found in berries. Maybe I underestimated bananas. They are after all, technically berries.

Still, I’m looking three fruits and I’m seeing some anthocyanins here and here, but not seeing much red, blue, or violet here. Now wild bananas are a different story. There’s anthocyanins in blue, purple, orange red, red purple, and pink purple bananas, but none in yellow… So the Harvard researchers were challenged on it and they said look, we just took values from the USDA, and it turns out USDA apparently made a mistake. No anthocyanins in bananas, and despite twice the vitamin C, bananas were beat out by apples in terms of overall antioxidant power. But that’s just measuring the ability of these fruits to quench an oxidation reaction in a test tube. It would be nice to measure actual biological activity. For example in this apple study, they also measured the ability of apple extracts, from both peeled and unpeeled apples, to suppress the growth of human cancer cells growing in a petri dish compared to control. Wouldn’t it be great to be able to compare that kind of superpower between different fruits. Well, now we can.

Here is a graph of cancer cell proliferation versus increasing concentrations of the 11 most common fruits eaten in the United States. They decided to use liver cancer for this study. If you drip water on these cancer cells as a control, nothing happens they start out powering away at 100% growth and they keep powering away at 100% growth. And pineapples, pears, and oranges don’t do much better. Peaches start pulling away from the pack. At high peach concentrations, cancer cell proliferation drops about 10%, but bananas and grapefruits work about 4 times better, dropping cancer growth rates by about 40%. Red grapes, strawberries and apples do even better, cutting cancer cell growth up to half at only half the dose, but these two fruits are the winners, causing a dramatic drop in cancer proliferation at just tiny doses, lemons, and, cranberries.

So if you look at the effective dose required to suppress liver cancer cell proliferation, apples are more powerful than bananas, but cranberries win the day. And there was no effective dose listed for orange, pear, and pineapple since they didn’t appear to affect the cancer cell growth at all.

Doctor’s Note
How can you consume cranberries palatably? Check out my recipe for Pink Juice with Green Foam.
More berried treasure in my next three videos:

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.
Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Photo Source: http://www.uhhospitals.org

High Protein Carrot Cake Ball Recipe For Cancer Diet

Carrot Cake Ball Recipe That is Sugar Free and VeganBy Breast Cancer Yoga Staff.

This recipe is very flexible. Use the nuts and seed you have on hand. Add less dates and oil/milk for a crumblier treat. Add more dates and oil/milk for a sweeter gooier snack. Always use organic ingredients when possible. Oil free cancer diets omit coconut oil and use coconut milk.

This recipe includes carrots which contain carotenoid antioxidants, these compounds help protect against oxidative DNA damage, a key event in the cancer process. This recipe also includes nuts which contain many helpful nutrients and healthy omega-3 fatty acids, which help your body fight inflammation. Nuts contain the antioxidants quercetin and campferol that may suppress the growth of cancers.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup almonds
  • 5-6 dates, pitted
  • 1/3 unsweetened shredded coconut
  • 2 Carrots, shredded
  • 1/2 Tbsp Cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp Cloves
  • 1 Scoop Vanilla Vegan Protein
  • 2-4 Tbsp coconut milk or coconut oil, melted

Instructions

  1. Put almonds in food processor. Blend until a fine flour. Remove.
  2. Put dates and coconut in food processor and blend until a smooth paste in formed.
  3. Return nuts, add carrots, spices and vegan protein, and mix well.
  4. Add coconut milk or oil and blend until desired consistency is reached.
  5. Form into balls.
  6. Store in refrigerator.

Recipe Source: Adapted From ICookFree
Photo Source: JoyousHealth.com

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Sulforaphane: From Broccoli to Breast

Broccoli Sprouts For Breast Cancer PreventionBy: Dr. Michael Greger, Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Broccoli and broccoli sprouts produce a compound that appears to target breast cancer cells, but this is in a test tube. How do we even know we absorb sulforaphane into our bloodstream? And even if we do, how much do we have to eat to arrive at these test tube concentrations where it counts—in breast tissue itself where a tumor may be evolving. An innovative group at Hopkins figured it out: let’s find women scheduled for breast reduction surgery, and an hour before they go into the operating room, have them drink some broccoli sprout juice. And that’s what they did.

They collected breast tissue from 8 women an hour after broccoli, and here’s what they found. An averaging of 2 picomoles per milligram in their left breasts and 1.45 in their right.

So now, for the first time ever, not only do we know that the broccoli we eat ends up in the right place, but we know the final tissue concentration. So what does that correspond to here? This is what broccoli sprouts do to both estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancer cells.

To continually bathe the tissues of your breast at this concentration you’d have to eat… a quarter cup of broccoli sprouts a day, a half cup, and about a cup and a quarter. In other words it’s doable—I just put them in my salad.
Real world effects at real world doses.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.
Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Video Sources

Li Y, Zhang T, Korkaya H, Liu S, Lee HF, Newman B, Yu Y, Clouthier SG, Schwartz SJ, Wicha MS, Sun D. Sulforaphane, a dietary component of broccoli/broccoli sprouts, inhibits breast cancer stem cells. Clin Cancer Res. 2010 May 1;16(9):2580-90.

Cornblatt BS, Ye L, Dinkova-Kostova AT, Erb M, Fahey JW, Singh NK, Chen MS, Stierer T, Garrett-Mayer E, Argani P, Davidson NE, Talalay P, Kensler TW, Visvanathan K. Preclinical and clinical evaluation of sulforaphane for chemoprevention in the breast. Carcinogenesis. 2007 Jul;28(7):1485-90.

Photo Source: http://www.herbalencounter.com

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