Cancer Exercise Specialist Helping Clients Achieve Their Full Potential

Deborah Hugh’s is one of 55 speakers from The Breast Cancer Rehabilitaion & Wellness Summit, her interest in fitness and nutrition led her to her first personal training job over 20 years ago. She became Nautilus Certified and continued her education by attending Suffolk Community College to earn her A.S. in Fitness Specialist.  Debbie holds an ACE Certification in Personal Training, is a Certified Cancer Exercise Specialist, a Certified Reiki Practitioner, and is currently enrolled in the Institute for Integrative Nutrition (IIN) earning her Holistic Health Coach Certification.

Throughout the years she has worked with a variety of clients with many different needs.  In 2005, she started her own company, The Fitness Club, which provides personal training and nutritional counseling to help clients achieve their full potential through exercise, whole foods, and happy living!

Debbie became a Certified Cancer Exercise Specialist after her friend and mentor lost her battle with breast cancer, this led to her to start Strength for Life with Jacqui Errico. It has become her personal mission to promote the amazing benefits of exercise, nutrition and complementary care for those diagnosed with cancer and to keep the memory of her friend alive.

Debbie created a community exercise program in which persons with a cancer diagnosis participate in group classes designed to enhance their recovery process. Services provided will include educating cancer patients and the general public on the benefits of exercise in reducing the risk of certain cancers and improving functional activities.

http://strengthforlifeny.org/ Debbie’s interest in fitness and nutrition led her to her first personal training job over 20 years ago. She became Nautilus Certified and continued her education by attending Suffolk Community College to earn her A.S. in Fitness Specialist.  Debbie holds an ACE Certification in Personal Training, is a Certified Cancer Exercise Specialist, a Certified Reiki Practitioner, and is currently enrolled in the Institute for Integrative Nutrition (IIN) earning her Holistic Health Coach Certification.

 

Sports & Exercise as it Relates to Breast Cancer Survivors

Sports & Exercise as it Relates to Breast Cancer SurvivorsCancer patients often wonder whether or not they should be exercising after being treated for cancer. Some people believe that exercise helps cancer patients, while others believe they should be more restful.

One research study (1) looked into the effect of exercise and sports in patients suffering from breast cancer. They combined the results of 51 other studies that evaluated the physiological and psychological effects that exercise had on these breast cancer survivors. They found that sports and exercise were safe to undergo in breast cancer survivals and that they uniformly did better about their physical and mental health.

With this data, they concluded that breast cancer patients should be encouraged to exercise after their treatment for cancer.

Source: 1. Battaglini, CL, et al. Twenty-five years of research on the effects of exercise training in breast cancer survivors: A systematic review of the literature. World J Clin Oncol. 2014 May 10; 5(2): 177–190.

Dr. Adem Gunes Dr. Adem Gunes has built the world’s largest database of scientifically tested natural substances with proven effects in cancer treatments. In 2009, he was appointed as the Chief Physician of ProLife Clinic in Innsbruck, Austria, and played a key role in the establishment of the research laboratory. He is also the co-founder of the first Austrian hyperthermia center. Now, Dr. Adem works closely with cancer patients from around the world (including Germany, Thailand, Dubai) to recommend them a complementary cancer clinic or to create a personalized care plan for patients to follow at home.

Don’t Let Age or Injury Hinder Your Commitment to Exercise: Doing the Sitting Bounce on Your Rebounder

Breast Cancer & Lymphedema Exercise on the Rebounder

Don’t Let Age or Injury Hinder your Commitment to Exercise: Doing the Sitting Bounce on Your Rebounder

It is true that we should not let anything prevent us from ensuring that we remain strong and healthy, which is why the sitting bounce on a rebounder trampoline is one of the best exercises that you can do.

Even if your body has been weakened due to illness, age, or an injury, you can use this exercise to increase your strength and energy.

There are many rebounder exercise routines that almost anyone can do.

However, one of the most age-neutral exercise routines would have to be the sitting bounce, which is an exercise that you can do even if you suffer from injuries that prevent you from doing typical exercises.

How to do the Sitting Bounce on your Rebounder 
If you want to try out the sitting bounce routine for yourself, here are the steps that you should take:

  1. Begin by sitting on your rebounder’s jump mat. It is best to have a workout buddy with you if you are still recovering from a serious injury.
  2. Not only will having a partner make it easier for you to get started, he or she will also help to make sure that you don’t accidentally fall off the trampoline and hurt yourself.
  3. Your guide should stand right behind you to assist you in doing your bounce. You will need to be in constant contact with your partner during this exercise.
  4. Once you have your partner positioned behind you, lift your hands up and have your partner hold them up for you.
  5. Now that you are in position, start bouncing. Try lifting yourself, with the help of your partner, and once you have reached your peak bounce height, allow yourself to fall back onto the trampoline.
  6. Do as many repetitions as you can for two to three minutes.

Benefits of the Sitting Bounce for Seniors

  • The great thing about the sitting bounce is that it helps eliminate the toxins accumulated inside your body through sweating without putting a lot of stress on your joints.
    This is great if you suffer from arthritis or any other ailment that causes painful inflammation in your joints.
  • In addition to reducing stress on your joints, the sitting bounce also works well when it comes to improving your core muscle group, which includes your back, abdominal region, and legs.
  • Continuously doing the sitting bounce will strengthen your core muscles, which in turn will allow you to do more strenuous exercises, such as the health bounce, without any risk of injury.

Ready to Get Moving with the Sitting Bounce?
So, if you intend to make yourself feel better and stronger regardless of your age or injury history, you can start by doing the beneficial sitting bounce routine with a friend.

Doing these bounce exercises can help you regain your strength, and even improve upon it.

If you want to be stronger and healthier with the help of a rebounder, you can look up even more techniques to enjoy by visiting the Rebounder Zone library.

Picture Source: http://cellercise.com/2016/05/27/three-basic-rebounding-exercises/

Be strong, active, and healthy!

Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZoneIf you are ready to start a new, refreshing stage in your battle against breast cancer, start rebounding today with these high quality rebounders. Use discount code VICTORY for 10% off all products in our store.

A life of better health awaits you.

Author: Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZone 

Having An Exercise Program As Part Of Your Cancer Treatment

Sports is not just a way to interact with friends and boost your self-esteem. The primary function of sports is maintaining your health and keeping you strong and fit. Engaging yourself in sports will help you improve your mental, emotional and physical health, thus contributing to your well-being as well.


General Recommendations for a Healthy Lifestyle:

Basically, one would need to maintain a proper weight or body mass index of 21-24 to have a reduced risk of cancer. To achieve this, a proper diet must be observed consistently along with sports activities. As much as possible, it is recommended to eat more fruits and vegetables and less red meat.

At all costs, processed meat and high levels of sweet foods must be avoided. One should also minimize alcohol intake, with the suggested amount of only 1-2 glasses per day. These recommendations must be taken very seriously, especially in people who have a high risk of developing cancer.

Effect of Sports on the Immune system:

Your body will become more resistant to diseases with a much healthier immune system in place with the help of sports and regular exercises. When your immune system, cell development, metabolism, and other bodily systems are regular and working, the chances of developing cancer will be reduced.

Studies Prove Reduced Cancer Risk:

Numerous experiments and research studies have shown that cancer can indeed be prevented by engaging in an active lifestyle. Studies prove that regular exercise reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer.

Another study from the University of Southern California proved that physical movements used in exercises like swimming, running, and aerobics are beneficial to prevent breast cancer.

Exercise Program Preferences In Cancer Patients:

You need not be a professional athlete to perform an exercise; you can perform any sport that you feel like doing. Even with the diverse preferences of people, there are different types of sports for everyone. If you fancy social interaction, it is always advisable for you to join sports teams such as volleyball, basketball, football, or baseball.

For those who enjoy spending time with nature, you are most likely to enjoy hiking, jogging, and cycling. Stationary exercises such as yoga and tai chi also prove to be very beneficial, because they focus on respiration, mental balance, flexibility and overall body coordination. Whatever it is that you choose to partake in, just make sure that it allows you to use the body to its full capacity while you are having fun.

Research about the effects of a balanced exercise program in the rehabilitation, prevention and the impact it has on the immune system is still in its initial phase. Although, it is going to be one of the most active areas of the sports medicine research in the coming decade.

Conclusion:

The earlier you participate in sports, the healthier you become. Engaging in regular physical activity keeps your body fit at the same time expelling sweat that contains waste products. Therefore, with regular exercise, there will be a significant decrease in the risk of developing many types of cancers.

References:

  1. Exercise for cancer patients: a new challenge in sports medicine
  2. Physical activity and cancer
  3. American College of Sports Medicine roundtable on exercise guidelines for cancer survivors.
  4. Exercise for Cancer Patients

Dr. Adem Gunes Dr. Adem Gunes has built the world’s largest database of scientifically tested natural substances with proven effects in cancer treatments. In 2009, he was appointed as the Chief Physician of ProLife Clinic in Innsbruck, Austria, and played a key role in the establishment of the research laboratory. He is also the co-founder of the first Austrian hyperthermia center. Now, Dr. Adem works closely with cancer patients from around the world (including Germany, Thailand, Dubai) to recommend them a complementary cancer clinic or to create a personalized care plan for patients to follow at home.

The Chromosomal Link Between Breast Cancer Risk and Obesity Found!

A recent study has found the chromosomal link that helps reduce or increase the risk for breast cancer through a mechanism that controls the weight of the woman.

Recently, research was conducted to study the link between weight loss, body fat and the length of a certain chromosome in the women with breast cancer.

It is well documented that maintaining a healthy weight through regular exercises, and a healthy diet are the keys to cancer prevention and management. However, the exact mechanism through which these factors work was not fully known.

Researchers at the Yale Cancer Center have found an explanation for this link in the small ends of a chromosome called telomeres. These findings will be presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium on December 11, 2015.

The research was based on a previously published study conducted at the Yale called LEAN that examined how weight loss through healthy lifestyle changes was linked with the telomere length in the breast cancer survivors who enrolled in a weight-loss program. It was found that the telomeres shortened with each cell division and were also associated with faster aging and an increased risk of mortality in the breast cancer patients.

The Yale study further explored the link between telomere length and weight loss in the breast cancer survivors. The research concluded that telomeres in the breast cancer survivors who had lost weight through regular exercise and a healthy diet were slower to shorten.

“It was also found that the telomere shortening was reversed in some cases when the women followed a healthy diet and lost weight,” said the first author of the study, Dr. Tara Sanft, the assistant professor of medical oncology.

“The results indicate that a higher body fat level could be associated with a shorter telomere length. Also, weight loss was strongly associated with an increase in the length of the telomere,” Sanft said. “This indicates that the length of telomere could be a mechanism through which the relationship between breast cancer risk and mortality and obesity is mediated.”

The senior author of the study, Melinda Irwin, said, “A growing body of scientific research linking lifestyle factors like exercising and maintaining a healthy weight with an improved breast cancer treatment success and survival is compelling.”

“With the findings of exercise and weight loss improving the mechanisms associated with breast cancer mortality and treatment success, a shift in the management of breast cancer patients that includes increased access to lifestyle behavioral counseling is expected,” Irwin said.

Meanwhile, new guidelines have been recommended by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Cancer Society. The women who have undergone lumpectomy for the removal of a cancerous lesion in the breast or mastectomy are advised to have regular follow ups with annual mammograms. Mammograms are not required for the women who have undergone reconstruction of the breasts. MRIs are also not recommended except in cases of high-risk factors.

Following these guidelines and maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise can improve the chances of survival of breast cancer patients substantially.

Find more about “Alternative ways of cancer treatment” for breast cancer on our website.

References:

1. Study links body fat, weight loss, and chromosome length in breast cancer patients
2. New follow-up care guidelines released for breast cancer survivors
3. Yale study explores breast cancer/weight loss link

Featured Photo Source: Ken Borsuk / Hearst Connecticut Media

Dr. Adem Gunes

Dr. Adem Gunes has built the world’s largest database of scientifically tested natural substances with proven effects in cancer treatments. In 2009, he was appointed as the Chief Physician of ProLife Clinic in Innsbruck, Austria, and played a key role in the establishment of the research laboratory. He is also the co-founder of the first Austrian hyperthermia center. Now, Dr. Adem works closely with cancer patients from around the world (including Germany, Thailand, Dubai) to recommend them a complementary cancer clinic or to create a personalized care plan for patients to follow at

Exercise – Important For The Breast Cancer Recovery Process

Exercise for Breast Cancer RecoveryLack of exercise is not what caused your cancer, so relax. If that were the case, the cancer rates would be so much larger. However, EXERCISE is very important to the recovery process and is also helpful in bringing the best attitude forward for the healing process. Coming eyeball to eyeball with cancer changes the perspective of quality of life. Thus, most of us are willing to do things for our own good in ways that we were not willing to before. Some of us love to EXERCISE and can’t wait to get to the gym or on our mountain bike. Others of us hate EXERCISE and have to be forced into doing it. I would wager that those of us who hate EXERCISE are EXERCISING for the wrong reasons and doing particular EXERCISES that we hate. So there are two goals here. First, discover an exercise you like or can tolerate because you feel good afterward. Second, set up your goal for your success.

If you are still in treatment your energy is lower but sitting or staying in bed all day only causes the toxins to build up. Walk for 10 minutes, or try walking 5 minutes a few times a day. Stretch. Lie in bed and move your body gently. Breathe. Yes, breathing is a form of exercise and Breast Cancer Yoga has a wonderful breathing CD. As you begin feeling better try Breast Cancer Yoga’s exercises for Yoga that are designed just for you, gentle lymphatic stretching. Get out of the house if even to just sit on the porch. Being outside moves your cells and allows them to enjoy fresh air versus the stale air from your AC or furnace. Listen to music and imagine yourself dancing to it and then gently move your muscles as if your muscles are dancing.

Post-treatment allow yourself to build up to 30 minutes of exercise a day. Start by doing 15 minutes, five days a week, then increase to two days for 3O minutes and continue to build up from there. Even though the lack of EXERCISE did not cause your cancer, let me be clear, EXERCISE, whether you like it or not, is important to your health. Thus, establish an EXERCISE habit as soon as possible after treatment so that it becomes a part of your new healthy lifestyle. The only rule needed is to EXERCISE at least thirty minutes a day whether you like it or not. The simplest way is to walk. Other than a good pair of shoes, walking EXERCISE does not require anything else and almost everyone can do it. If you can’t walk, then you need to discover other ways to EXERCISE. Stretching is a good choice and it does not require any fancy equipment. Yoga is also a great choice because it allows your body to detox the lymph system allowing those mutant cells to keep moving out of your body rather than getting stagnant and begin to build new tumors. Learning to make EXERCISE a part of your daily routine is a very important part of self-care. The goal is to EXERCISE more days a week than not. EXERCISE will help you stay flexible and healthy as you age. It is simple. The only goal is to do it. Don’t do it to lose weight, do it because you love yourself and because you are important.

Family members, it is not only important that you support your family member in an EXERCISE routine but that you too stay healthy by finding an EXERCISE activity that you enjoy and get out there and do it. Making EXERCISE a family affair will make it something fun and something to look forward to.

Last, when you get bored, change it out. If you get sick and can’t for a few days, get right back out there. If you miss a day, dance inside for 15 minutes anyway. MOVE your body as much as you can everyday.

Featured Photo Source: St. Louis Dispatch

Dr. Robin DilleyDr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer is a licensed psychologist in the State of Arizona. Her eclectic practice allows her to cross diagnostic barriers and meet clients in their need assisting them to respond to life in healthy and empowering ways rather than react to life’s circumstances.

How To Get Yourself Back After Cancer Treatment

How to get yourself back after cancer treatmentThis past weekend I ran a 10-mile race. I realized afterward that it has been exactly three years since I received the call that changed my life. I remembered this same race, the Mid-Winter Classic in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, three years ago. I did not compete, but my husband did. That year the race was a few days earlier, and I didn’t know what was coming.

I had a mammogram and ultrasound, done two days before, which were both “reassuring”. I distinctly remember waiting for my husband to finish and thinking I had nothing to worry about.

I was wrong, and four days later I knew it. Because of the timing, in my mind, this race will always be associated with my cancer diagnosis. I competed this year for the third time. It is a great race. Well organized, good course. Big enough to be fun, but not so big that the logistics become difficult (making it less fun.)

The first time I ran was two years ago. I had just completed my treatment three months before; and, I had a great day. The weather was warm, for February. I ran well, finished strong and felt good. Since I had lost a lot of conditioning during treatment, I had no real expectations about pace or time and was pleased with an 8:39-minute/mile pace. I even ran the last mile, which is mostly uphill in an 8:08-minute pace. I have never been a fast runner, usually in the middle of the pack. The 8:39 put me right where I wanted to be.

I had come full circle. It had been a year. My treatment was behind me. I felt strong, was able to push myself. I had gone from thinking all I would need was a biopsy, to surviving the full monty of breast cancer treatment and now thriving enough to run a 10-mile race in a respectable time.  I felt like my old self.

After the race, I kept training and pushing myself to get faster. I did another 10-mile race two months later and ran faster. I did a few sprint triathlons and continued to feel strong, fast and improve with every race.

Until sometime in July, when the wheels came off the bus. I was tired and sore all the time. I did some more races. Instead of feeling strong and getting faster, I felt awful and got slower and slower.

In October, I ran a half marathon that was almost a minute per mile slower than I had run in April. I then realized my clothes didn’t fit, and I had gained ten pounds! I was exercising vigorously every day, and yet I had lost fitness and gained weight.

getting back to good health after cancer treatmentI am still figuring out what went wrong. So far I have come up with a few theories. I overtrained and did not let myself recover. I needed to back off, give myself some time to rest, both from my workouts as well as the long year of treatment.

I did not do any strength training. We all lose muscle mass with age and all the training I was doing, without any recovery, accelerated that loss.

Or maybe it was just too much for my poor body which had been through so much with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation.

Whatever the cause, I was out of shape and overweight, despite working out all the time. What should I do now? I needed a new plan. More exercise, or, at least, more aerobic exercise, was clearly not the answer. But what was?

Some discomfort and soreness during and after a workout are good, which is part of what helps you to improve. Knowing when you have crossed the line from a challenging workout to an overdoing it workout is hard. I usually think more is better, now I know that it is not. Frequently, but not always, I can tell when I am doing too much. I listen to what my body is telling me because it does tell me.

It also seems that I needed more strength training. Strength used to be an afterthought. I more or less thought it was a waste of time, and it was the first thing to go if I had time constraints or flagging motivation. Strength and conditioning are now a priority that I make sure to do at least two if not three times per week.

Happily I can report that these changes seemed to have worked!

I ran the race this year 10 seconds/mile slower than I had two years ago. I think that’s a win. Pace aside, I felt strong, I finished well and had fun, which of course should always be the primary goal. So often the fun part gets lost, especially when you have a goal time in mind. This race reminded me that pushing yourself to perform is fun, even when it’s hard, and sometimes hurts.

The last 12-18 months were frustrating after realizing what I did to myself. I learned that my body has changed, I am sure cancer treatment caused, at least, some of that change, but so does age. The good news is that you can still improve even when you are getting older, and even if you have had to suffer through cancer treatment.

Listen to yourself, you can learn a lot.

What obstacles did you have getting back to good health after cancer treatment? Let me know

Dr. Kate KiloranDr. Kate Killoran is a board-certified OB/GYN with 15+ years of clinical experience and a breast cancer survivor. Medical school, residency, and clinical practice educated her thoroughly about disease. What her medical education failed to teach her was how to be healthy and well. This she learned from her breast cancer diagnosis.

She practices what she preaches using her knowledge of health, wellness, and disease to help other women be healthy, happy, and well. She sees patients both in her office in beautiful Camden, Maine as well as online at www.drkatemd.com.

For more information or if you’d like to contact Dr. Kate, please visit drkatemd.com.

Exercise! It’s Important For Cancer Survivors and Thrivers

Yoga On The Lawn With Diana Ross, Breast Cancer Survivors & Family Members.

Yoga On The Lawn With Diana Ross, Breast Cancer Survivors & Family Members.

By: Brian D. Lawenda, MD, Clinical Director, 21st Century Oncology &  www.1UpOnCancer.com.

Almost every opportunity I get, I take the time to sit down with my active cancer patients & thrivers and ask them ‘how are you feeling?’

…The number one thing I often hear is ‘I have no energy’ or ‘I’m tired all the time.’

Although potentially serious causes first need to be evaluated and addressed by your doctors, feeling tired during and after cancer treatment (also known as “cancer related fatigue” or CRF) is often a result of the cancer or the effects of treatment on your body. CRF is one of the most common and distressful symptoms our patients face, and it can persist for months to years after treatment. Did you know that one of the most effective ways to fight and reverse CRF is with exercise? Seems counterintuitive, doesn’t it?

No one knows precisely how exercise is able to help you fight CRF. The most likely theory is that exercise reduces inflammation and free radicals in the body (by lowering levels of inflammatory proteins, called “cytokines”), both of which seem to increase the severity and risk of CRF.

Sadly, many patients and physicians feel that once you have been diagnosed with cancer there is no point in focusing on starting healthful lifestyle habits (i.e. smoking cessation, eating healthfully, weight loss if overweight, etc.)…after all, the ‘damage has already been done’, right?

NOT TRUE. Increasingly, researchers are proving that this fatalistic approach is absolutely wrong, particularly when it comes to not getting adequate physical activity.

Studies show that physical activity not only improves your overall health, but can reduce your risk of a cancer recurrence (or even dying from cancer) after treatment.

How many of your doctors have told you about the remarkable effects of exercise in fighting cancer? My guess is not many. You might want to inform them that credentialed research has found that by simply walking 3-4 total hours per week a breast cancer thriver can reduce their risk of a recurrence by up to 60%; this risk reduction is not unique to breast cancer.

An added benefit of exercise is that it will reduce your risk of developing future cancers. Unfortunately, just because you’ve had one cancer doesn’t mean you are out of the woods for developing a different one in the future. I have treated too many patients who have had more than one cancer in their lifetime.

While we are still learning exercises’ role in reducing the development, growth or recurrence of cancer, it seems that at least some of the anti-cancer effects have to do with numerous beneficial hormonal, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative changes that occur in the body from exercise and weight loss.

How much exercise do you need?

The majority of experts recommend that your goal be to get at least 150 minutes each week (30 minutes per day, 5 days per week) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (i.e. brisk walking) and at least 2-3 sessions of strength training per week (i.e. weights, resistance exercises.)

New information has come out recently that is also important to know: it’s not enough to only be physically active just once a day for 30 minutes.

We now know that the amount of time we spend each day being inactive (i.e. watching TV, sitting for prolonged periods of time) also increases our risk of cancer growth, recurrence, and death. So, at the very least, get up and do something active every hour.

The health benefits of physical activity extend well-beyond cancer:

  • Reduced risk of dying early from other medical conditions
  • Improved quality of life
  • Improved sleep
  • Improved muscle strength and flexibility
  • Improved bone density
  • Improved cardiovascular health
  • Improved immune function
  • Reduced stress, anxiety and depression

Need motivation to get your activity levels up?

I’m a big fan of using a gadget called a “pedometer.” You can clip these to your

waist or wear them on your wrist, and they will count the steps or activity you do through the day. Studies show that most people think they are far more active than they actually are. Using a pedometer is enlightening, as it doesn’t lie. When a person wears a pedometer, researchers have found that activity increases by over 25%. To maintain healthful fitness levels, a goal of 10,000 steps (approximately 5 miles) per day is recommended.

It is smart to be cautious before starting an exercise regimen if you’ve had cancer as you may have new treatment-related side effects or limitations (i.e. lymphedema, neuropathy, limitations in range of motion.) That said, most experts agree that exercise is very safe during and after treatment as long as you are careful. If you have any questions or concerns about what kind of exercise is appropriate and safe for you, discuss this with your doctors. You may also want to work with a fitness professional (i.e. trainers, therapists, cancer rehabilitation programs) to help design an exercise program specifically tailored to you. Make sure that you investigate their credentials first, as it is important that they have experience working with clients who have a history of cancer.

So, what are you waiting for… just do it!

Available Exercise Resources For Breast Cancer:
Restorative Yoga For Breast Cancer Recovery: Gentle Flowing Yoga For Breast Health, Cancer Related Fatigue and Lymphedema Management

Founder of  1UpOnCancer.Com

Rachel Pappas is breast cancer survivor. She is the founder of www.1UpOnCancer.com. And the author of Hopping Roller Coasters, which tells the story of her and her daughter, both diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

Breast Cancer Breathing Guidelines & Techniques During Exercise

Breathing Guidelines & Techniques For Breast Cancer

Yoga Model Angela Strynkowski, E-RYT 200, RYT 500 Founder of http://www.AJewelInTheLotus.com

How to breathe and control your breath Is important:


The breathing exercise that we propose is simple and controls the constant practice of involuntary inhalation and breath through the understanding and regulating the process. It has a great beneficial effect on the physical and mental health.

In yoga, breathing is known as a rather integrating principle called the prana, a wide-reaching effects that can bridge the body, mind and spirit together in a harmony which is the basis of yoga and meditation. The practice of yoga is breathing after all seeking yoga breathing techniques to maximize this universal energy that exists inherently in all of us.

Those who practice yoga feel that this state of harmony is natural and there are many aspects of life that pull apart the internal harmony of our. The yoga breathing exercise is one of the basic fundamental techniques we can use to control and even eliminate the impact of external forces have on overall health and well-being.

Some basic guidelines to breathing techniques during exercise:

  • Get up early in the morning. Come out to the countryside and make sure you’re near an open window.
  • 
Sit with back straight. Keep your hands loose inside the basin you. Observe for a few minutes to breath and has stabilized the rate of take a deep breath very slowly. As the air enters pull your belly inward, outward raising your chest. The muscles of your stomach must be tense.
  • 
Hold the breath and count to five. Then exhale and gradually relax the abdominal muscles. If you have too tiring to hold your breath counting to five, count to three or less.
  • Take a full breath – inhalation, end – and then repeat the whole exercise.
  • Once familiar and master in this technique, you can try switching between the left and right nostrils.
  • Close alternating nostrils consecutively using the thumb and ring finger with the little finger of right hand, while the other two fingers should be folded. First inhale deeply through the left nostrils and exhale through the left. Too late. Make sure stomach muscles are turned on enough.
  • 
Then change the process – breathe in through the right and exhale through right. Repeat entire process for some time.



Yoga Breathing Techniques:

1. Breathing practice. First of all, it should be jurisdiction, time and motivation to improve our breathing through exercise. The yoga breathing techniques to help turn the main control of the minds and our bodies, but can only work if you commit to a disciplined program for a period of several months.
2. Understand the physiology of breathing. Much of advanced breathing techniques yoga breathing involves changing the speed and breath as well as controlling the depth of breathing exercises. The goal of yoga breathing (pranayama) is to facilitate the mind and heart and increase the oxygenation of the cells in your body – otherwise known as a process of breathing. To master the pranayama, the images in your mind the end of the toxicity and gas up and breathe, your mind is pure, clean oxygen your body.
3. Be aware of your body and breathing. The yoga breathing techniques emphasize the role of your body, of your abdomen, sides of your chest and your chest as well as your lungs breathing in the yoga. For example, when you practice deep breathing to the abdomen is a critical indicator to get enough breath to complete adequate oxygenation. Truly mastered the pranayama is only possible when you become aware of the pace of your breathing in any activity at any time of day.
4. Dining and inhalation and exhalation, focused almost entirely on inhalation, making sure getting a real deep breath, without any focus on how they let the air out of my body. In fact, the end is as important to the success of yoga breathing exercises. Focusing on a consistent, controlled version rather than a jerky, uncontrolled release.

Inhaling
Inhalation should be done gently and effortlessly. Prefer to breathe through the nose. Do not tense the nostrils; let them remain relaxed. It should all be done in a smooth, continuous rhythm with each part following smoothly on from the previous part. Avoid any jerky movements and undue strain.

  1. Slowly and gently push the stomach forwards as you breathe in.
  2. Push the ribs sideways while still breathing in. The stomach will automatically go inwards slightly.
  3. Lift the chest and collar-bone up while still breathing in.
  4. When it has been completed pause for a second or so, holding the breath (optional). Mind it is to be un-forced.

Exhaling

  1. Just allow the collar-bone, chest and ribs to relax-the air will go out automatically.
  2. When all the air seems to be out, push the stomach in very slightly to expel any remaining air in the lungs. The upper ribs are now contracted first.
  3. You may take a tiny (optional) not-forced pause here too, just as on top of the inhaling.

 

 

Source http://www.oaks.nvg.org/deep-breathing

Long-term health benefits of yoga breathing exercise is potentially significant, but short-term increase in energy, focus, peace and brain power you gain from just a five minute yoga breathing technique is incredibly strong in your general well – availability, productivity and happiness.
Read more on Swami Ramdev yoga exercises and yoga for beginners.
Source http://www.gleez.com/articles/health-beauty/yoga-breathing-and-breath-exercise

Diana RossAbout Diana Ross:  E-RYT 500 restorative yoga teacher, survivor that cares and founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Diana is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

 

Choose An Exercise Program That Is Right For You!

Exercise Program For Breast Cancer

By: Rika Keck, Medical Exercise Specialist For Women’s Wellness.

It is well known that an exercise program is supportive before, during and after surgery and treatment. Off course it is essential to see it within context of the individual, medical procedures, reaction to meds and energy levels.

Moderation is a big key and it is a great idea to work-out and to ‘work-in’ with quiet, stress reducing modalities such as meditation, Gentle Yoga, Qi Gong or a walk in Nature.

Here are a few points regarding exercise during and post-surgery and/or treatment:

  • Strength training will support bone integrity that becomes compromised with chemo and steroids. Discuss this with your physician if lymph nodes are affected in your cancer treatment or lymphodema in the arm is present.
  • A moderate/low intensity cardio program will support a healthy heart, circulation and mood – a mild sweat is a good guideline. Do wipe off the sweat so it does not re-enter the body, after all, the skin is an organ of elimination. (While undergoing radiation treatment, do discuss this with your doctor, as there are restrictions.)
  • Clothing might present some challenges. Make comfortable and organic cotton choices that allow free movement and airflow.
  • Physical therapy, post-therapy exercise will provide ROM (range of motion) as incisions start to heal. You want to avoid restrictions in movement to prevent secondary shoulder, wrist, neck and back problems. The process of regaining full range of motion after surgery does take time.
  • Acupuncture on the scares and adhesions is a good idea as scars can disrupt the nervous system. At the same time it will boost immune function and provide stress reduction. It is necessary to wait for healing of the skin.
  • Fatigue must be respected – yet a gentle exercise program will actually increase energy and support lymphatic flow.
  • Posture exercises: With the physical, emotional and psychological trauma, it is ‘normal’ to pull inwards in a protective manner esp. after surgery. Awareness and gentle exercises that pay attention to good posture will support the physical body and energetic flow between organs and glands.
  • Social support and laughter are so important. If possible seek out a fun, nurturing and safe environment. Uplifting music does help too!
  • Radiation adversely affects heart and lung health. (I am aware that this is a controversial point.) The bottom line is: Do support your cardiovascular system.

When it is cold outside, we must make sure to get our daily movement. Certainly there is nothing more refreshing and immune – stimulating than taking a brisk walk outside! However, trying to maneuver icy pavements or paths in Central Park can be challenging and this does increase the risk of falling.

I believe in ‘risk assessment’: Exercise regularly and moderately, but in a safe and fun environment.

Basic Facts: Let’s Talk About Exercise, Heart Health & Nutrition!
For bone health, esp. in menopause, it is important to add ‘stress’ on the bones. Walking is great, but it is not enough to facilitate sufficient bone stress and remodeling of bone. Walking does support a healthy cardiovascular system, lymphatic drainage and detoxification – besides burning off those Holiday treats…

Resistance training is essential to support stronger bones, especially if one has a genetically predetermined small frame. It is not about lifting heavy weights ‘a la Schwarzenegger’ and one generally does not ‘bulk up’ easily – a concern I still hear about today. Weight training for healthy bones is about a regular ‘overload’ on the connective tissue. If you carry your own shopping bags twice a week, you are doing your bones (but maybe not your back) a favor!

As a Nutrition and Exercise Specialist, I do stress that bones must be supported with good nutrition and a regular weight – training exercise program. It is also helpful not to live on an adrenaline rush. The hormones, esp. elevated cortisol, will adversely affect the mineral metabolism and bone health.

Acid-blocking medications will affect the absorption of calcium and magnesium from foods. This can result in a calcium deficiency affecting bones and teeth, increasing the risk of fractures and cavities. If you are using acid blocking meds, you are welcome to connect with me to discuss your options.

As we age, our tendons are more at risk, esp. if we have not been exposed to using weights or athletic movements. It is better to err on the side of caution by receiving expert guidance. Schedule a few sessions with a professional to get you going or join an exercise class with a good instructor. (Do your research!!!)

If there are pre-existing and additional physical restrictions e.g. joint concerns or joint replacements or other medical considerations, I would recommend starting up with the advice of an exercise professional. I have some clients, whom I meet for a few sessions to ‘get the ball rolling’.

Exercise movements that are functional and support balance training should be incorporated. Core training, stability and flexibility training must also be part of the program. All will support activities of daily living. As we age, generally it is the lack of flexibility and muscle tissue that can predispose us to a greater risk of injury, falls and decreased function.

Heart Health?
Despite all we hear about cancer, it is important to note that heart disease is still the #1 killer of men and women. Certainly, many factors play a role. However, do consider that the heart is a muscle and it needs to be kept strong with regular and continuous exercise.

Heart health requires good nutrition and regular exercise. Various medications will rob nutrients from the heart, brain and body. These nutrients include vitamins such as vitamin A, B, C, and minerals such as magnesium, zinc, calcium and CoQ10 and more…All are essential to maintain a healthy heart. If you are on medications, you would want to consider the possibility of medication induced vitamin/mineral deficiency. Chronic stress, living on an adrenaline charge and lack of sleep affects heart health adversely. Exercise is a great stress-reducing modality – but do make sure you rest too and do not over-exercise esp. cardio training!

What Else?
From a mind body perspective, integration of Yoga or other stress – reducing techniques incl. mediation are terrific.
Pilates is very popular too and it is very helpful for flexibility and reduced joint stress.

What matters most?
Choose an exercise program that is right for you!
Choose an exercise program that suits your needs, is effective and does not create pain. Sure, a little sore muscle here and there after strength work will let you now that you made ‘communication’ – your bones will be happy. What can happen with strength training is ‘Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)’. This happens within 24-48 hrs.

Before starting on an exercise program, do check in with your physician if you are on medications and/or have health concerns. Should you have had surgery, it is best to receive ‘clearance’ from the doc before starting to exercise.

In the meantime, let’s keep walking, healing and smiling!

Rika KechRika Keck is a nutrition, fitness women’s wellness consultant and contributor for Breast Cancer Authority Blog
Customized Nutrition, Medical Exercise Specialist and Women’s Wellness
NY Integrated Health
www.NYIntegratedHealth.com

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