Half Happy Baby Yoga Pose For Breast Cancer

Half Happy Baby Yoga Pose
By: Diana Ross, E-RYT 500, Co-Founder of Breast Cancer Yoga.

Releasing physical and emotional tension is the blessing with these reclined yoga poses. Although we take our body functions for granted, the body is always engaged in self-healing; even when under excessive stress and strain. During recovery, reclined supported yoga poses will add additional support both emotionally and physically.

Benefits

  • Opens groin, hips and hamstrings
  • Reduces excessive lumbar curvature
  • Works on relaxing lumbar sacrum
  • Stimulates lymphatic drainage
  • Stretches gluteus muscles
  • Stretches the rhomboids and inner arm
  • Squeezes liver and gallbladder area for toxins release
  • Compresses stomach and pancreas area for toxin release
  • Helps to relieve stress and fatigue

Contraindications

  • Herniated disc, knee injury and pregnancy

Half Happy Baby Restorative Yoga Pose For CancerInstructions 

  1. Begin on your back with feet resting on bolster, or folded blankets.
  2. EXHALE, bring right knee towards chest and out to side. Bring straight-arm to
    the inside of the leg, place hands on inner arch, or inner leg. If too difficult
    take arms wrap around knee.
  3. Place a yoga block on a slant by side (armpit) and draw knee onto it. Keep left
    leg bent. Important to work on relaxing sacrum and facial muscles.
  4. You can extend left leg over the bolster to deepen the pose.
  5. Direct your breath towards the hip and groin opening.
  6. Stay and breath for 5 breaths.
  7. EXHALE, bring KNEES TO CHEST then lower and stretch legs out.
  8. Repeat another side .

Practicing flowing restorative yoga movements, along with evenly pacing the breath will restore strength and increase both energy and flexibility. Breast Cancer Yoga is intended to awaken positive emotions, build self-confidence and diminish depression. As we continue to practice this flowing yoga, we become open to a higher realization of everything and everyone around us. Our world expands and there is a greater acceptance of “what is.”

To experience the benefits of yoga for breast cancer, it is essential that you begin with simple, gentle yoga movements. You should also consult a doctor before you begin practicing yoga. It is also necessary that you follow a yogic diet that consists of a mainly vegetarian diet to enhance the benefits of yoga.

Diana RossAbout Diana Ross:  E-RYT 500 Restorative yoga teacher, survivor that cares and founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Diana is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Breast Cancer Authority Contributor Blogs

Breast Cancer Authority Best Blogs 2014Breast Cancer Authority — a network of the most influential members of the online breast cancer community. We are bloggers, tweeters, pinners, and leaders of Facebook pages — we drive the healthcare conversation online, across virtually every holistic approach to breast cancer topic. Our Breast Cancer Authority contributors offer “The Best Breast Cancer Blogs” that do an amazing job of telling very personal stories of survival and These talented writers, most of them breast cancer survivors, give . Women with breast cancer will find familiar storylines and helpful perspectives, but all readers will come away touched, motivated, educated and inspired.

ody, mind, spirit Integration and wellbeing through sacred wisdom.

As an adjunct to her clinical practice, she created this blog to provide information and support for individuals and couples who can benefit from psychological and spiritual expertise.

Lots To Live For Margot Malin  embarked on the “creative reinvention” phase of her career with the intention of “giving back”. The inspiration for her blog came after both her mother and grandmother passed away after fighting courageous battles with cancer. Margot wanted to provide options and support to others who were going through exhausting and debilitating treatments.

SURVIVING CANCERLAND: Psychic Healing 

Breast Cancer Warrior Beverly McKee a Breast Cancer Authority Blog contributor and a licensed mental health therapist by training, writer at heart. Determined to use her diagnosis as a catalyst for positive change, Beverly offers HOPE and insight to her worldwide following through her blog.

Natural Counselor Blog  Irina Wardas a Breast Cancer Authority Blog contributor is a certified holistic health coach who helps women to get healthier and happier naturally with a mind-body detox techniques and tools. Her blog includes information on topics such as: cancer prevention, food as medicine, and healthy cooking.

The Good Witch Lisa Robbins a Breast Cancer Authority Blog contributor and a Registered Holistic Nutritionist with a BS in Holistic Nutrition. Lisa offers lots of quick healing tips, delicious healing recipes and awesome informative resources to share with you on her blog.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

 

Alternating Arm Across Chest Twist and Flow

Alternating Arms Across Chest Step 4By: Diana Ross, E-RYT 500 Co-Founder of Breast Cancer Yoga.

Alternating Arm Across Chest Twist and Flow Yoga Pose for breast cancer recovery is such a fun and fluid, moving twist. The flowing yoga pose can create a keen sense of calmness while increasing circulation to the entire pectoral region and the arms.

Benefits:

  • Promotes lymphatic drainage
  • Increases circulation of overall blood flow, especially to pectoral region
  • Increases range of motion in shoulders
  • Lengthens hip flexors
  • Massages internal organs
  • Stretches the tensor fascia lata muscle (muscle of the thigh), waist and spine
  • Stretches inner groin and opens hips
  • Induces sense of calmness

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Instructions:

  1. Begin on back, with knees bent and feet/legs in BUTTERFLY POSE.
  2. INHALE, arms out in T position, place small pillow or folded blanket under head (this allows for shoulders to relax down).
  3. EXHALE, right arm over to left arm (hand on top of hand) then slowly bring right knee over to left knee.
  4. INHALE, right arm returns to T and right knee back to BUTTERFLY.
  5. EXHALE, left arm over to right arm then slowly bring left knee over to right knee.
  6. INHALE, left arm back to T position and left knee back to BUTTERFLY.
  7. Continue to flow back and forth alternating sides. Make sure that there is a delay with the legs so that the twist is deliberate and meaningful.
  8. When ready EXHALE over to right side, then INHALE just the left arm back to T position and maintain the twist for 5 breaths.
  9. INHALE, return to BUTTERFLY and repeat on other side.

Practicing flowing restorative yoga movements, along with evenly pacing the breath will restore strength and increase both energy and flexibility. Breast Cancer Yoga is intended to awaken positive emotions, build self-confidence and diminish depression. As we continue to practice this flowing yoga, we become open to a higher realization of everything and everyone around us. Our world expands and there is a greater acceptance of “what is.”

To experience the benefits of yoga for breast cancer, it is essential that you begin with simple, gentle yoga movements. You should also consult a doctor before you begin practicing yoga. It is also necessary that you follow a yogic diet that consists of a mainly vegetarian diet to enhance the benefits of yoga.

Diana RossAbout Diana Ross:  E-RYT 500 restorative yoga teacher, survivor that cares and founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Diana is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Dr. Robin B. Dilley’s Top TWELVE Psychotherapy Tools

To Do List-Top 12 ToolsBy Dr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer & licensed psychologist.

Psychotherapy is a journey of positive self-care, positive actions, positive thinking and positive being. It is an investment in yourself that does not get packed into a sixty- minute session once a week. Being a person surviving Breast Cancer you have invested countless hours in research, medical appointments, and treatment options and alternatives. Now, as I say to my psychotherapy clients it is time to focus on all of the other hours of the week that you are not doing treatment. Below is a guideline. Pick and choose what speaks to you. The list is not in any particular order. The time guidelines are just that, guidelines.

1.) Practice a daily time of meditation as a way to learn mindfulness.

How: Make a safe place in your home where you can sit. Sit for ten minutes a day in the same spot. You can use music to listen to if you have a hard time with silence. Classical music or Tibetan Singing Bowls can be very helpful. Focus on your breath, breathing in deeply and exhaling slowly.  Pay attention to your body. Breathe in and let go of the tight places. Notice your thoughts and let them pass on through, as if entering the front door and walking out the back door.

2.) Draw a circle and choose three crayon colors to represent your current emotional state. Take 20 minutes and color in the circle. Then choose a happy color and color the outside of the circle until there is now white space left. Next, name your piece of art and then put it away. Get up and go and do something on your to do list.

3.) Have a journal and record your thoughts and feelings. It has been proven by the Journal of the American Medical Association, that writing down your thoughts helps you feel better by allowing you to get your thoughts out of your head and down on paper. It provides you with a better sense of objectivity.

4.) Track your emotions, depression, anxiety, or personal problem on a scale of 1-10 every day. 10 is feeling great and in charge of your life. 1 is a state of overwhelm and victimization. On anything below 5 ask your self what you can do make it better for today? For instance, if your depression is a 1 what can you do to make it a 2? Any of the above exercises can be helpful. If it is 6 or above ask yourself what you are doing and can do to keep it there?

5.)  Have an inner dialogue with yourself, your inner child, the compassionate mother within or a wise inner mentor.

6.) Breathe. Sit and count your breaths 1-10 three times, get up and do something else.

7.) Make a to-do list and refer to it daily. Check three things off a day.

8.) If you are experiencing relationship issues, have you and your partner read a self help book and talk about it.

9.) If you are having financial problems discover online tools on how to budget, save, and track your spending

10.) Spirituality is often the key to getting additional resources for your daily life. Explore a spiritual practice you have never considered, such as Buddhism, Yoga, Tai Chi, Labyrinth Walking, Prayer, or explore a convenient and positive congregation near you. You may discover that not all churches are like they use to be when you decided to close the door of your spiritual connection. (I am not saying that you closed the door or aborted your spirituality, I am asking you to explore how to incorporate spirituality in your life today and allow it to be meaningful.)

11.) BREAST CANCER survivors, focus on the positive things that you do each day to help your body heal and recover. Acknowledge the small steps.

12.) Keep a gratitude Journal and re-read.

Dr. Robin Dilley

Dr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer is a licensed psychologist in the State of Arizona. Her eclectic practice allows her to cross diagnostic barriers and meet clients in their need assisting them to respond to life in healthy and empowering ways rather than react to life’s circumstances.

 

Why I Sing Mantra

Why I Sing Mantra Diana's Desk

By: Diana Ross, E-RYT 500 Co-Founder Breast Cancer Yoga

Well, I know it has been forever since I wrote in the “Diana’s Desk” section. Somehow felt no one was listening but then I thought again and said “This is good for me.  It keeps my enthusiasm and connectedness going.”  I do love life, and I do get sad.  I guess just like all of us.

Recently I lost my best friend, Riley and I still am having difficulty coming to terms with it but I know in my heart I must. So what can I do? Well, there is one thing I keep returning to that helps me feel connected and not so alone and that  is music and mantra.  I have been learning how to play harmonium and sing mantra with this wonderful woman, Shyama. One particular mantra seems to really bring peace to my aching heart, and that is the Hanuman Chalisa.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0gRc2FMNsU

For those of you new to mantra – please let me explain. Mantra is like uncovering your inner essence. When repeating a mantra over and over one reveals something deeper within, as to what we show on the surface or superficial layer. Mantra can be one word, a phrase or a combination of both with sound. Together this helps us to connect to this world and the world that transcends our ordinary sensory and intellectual experiences.  The mind holds us in this world when we repeat the mantra and then slowly and surely the mantra is internalized. The mantra is then beyond this world.

Mantras are not puzzling or unexplainable. Instead they simply are to gather up the energies of our inner life, our dreams and desires and then lift us up to them to be realized. Repeating mantra with music for me is the most satisfying form of peace and connectedness. When I sit in front of my harmonium and let myself go while singing mantra I disconnect from the words and feel connected to the infinite.  An inner quiet sweeps over me.  It’s me; not what I feel me should be. I feel connected to what the mantra embodies. I don’t know if I am making sense to you but when I sing or even repeat mantra my mind remains focused and my heart opens. The sounds fill the space in my mind and other silly and useless thoughts leave my awareness, thus stabilizing my attention. I begin to sense that I am more than my mind’s endless chatter. I begin to feel a deeper enduring pressence of happiness, and hopefully purpose. Thanks for listening and please check out Krishna Das’s Hanuman Chalisa. Absolutely one of my favorites.

Diana RossAbout Diana Ross:  E-RYT 500 restorative yoga teacher, survivor that cares and founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Diana is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

My Story of Survivorship, and Change

Christine Taylor Breast Cancer SurvivorBy Christine Taylor

I was diagnosed with breast cancer when I was thirty-two.  At the time, my idea of what it meant to have breast cancer only had one ending.  Just a few years before I my diagnosis, I had watched helplessly as my young aunt fought her battle and, ultimately succumbed to her disease.  That is how I thought my story would end too, and I was terrified.

The turning point for me happened when I was going in for a biopsy of my lungs. A nurse was checking my wristband at the hospital and said, “I had breast cancer eight years ago.” Then, my mother’s friend shared that she was eight years out of treatment. The woman fitting me for my wig had breast cancer ten years ago, and my amazing yoga teacher is over twenty years out.  Everywhere I went, I met someone with a wonderful story of survivorship. The care, compassion and words of hope that they gifted me with were exactly what I needed to realize that I could have my own story.

I wanted to look into a young girl’s eyes many years from now and be able to offer the same hope and support that so many women gave me when I needed it.  As a newly diagnosed patient, I was driven to find the best modalities and the best practitioners that were suited to work with a woman with breast cancer who is holistic minded.   As I built my team of caregivers, I thought, “Wouldn’t it be great to take what I have learned share it with other women?”

So, I went back to school to become a certified holistic health coach.  Now, I specialize in helping women with cancer in all stages of treatment and survivorship.  I work with them, not just through diet and exercise, but also through recognizing the importance of caring for their mind and spirit. I introduce clients to the tools that helped me such as Reiki and guided meditation yoga and more, and refer them to the best practitioners and teachers.  My aim is to empower people to take responsibility for their quality of life and for their health moving forward through simple and sustainable changes that are easy to integrate.

I believe that we are all together in this journey and that our gifts and talents become amplified when we face life’s challenges.  It is up to all of us who have come through a painful experience to use what we have learned to make the trip a little easier for those who come after us.  Sharing your experience is one of the greatest gifts you can give to the world.

Christine TaylorChristine Taylor is a Holistic Health Coach, and a student of Reiki. She lives in Hampton Bays, NY

www.peacelightandhealth.com

www.facebook.com/peacelightandhealth

How Do Plant- Based Diets Fight Cancer?

By Michael Greger M.D.

Plant-Based Diets Fight Cancer

Why do centenarians—those who live to be over a hundred years old—escape cancer? As you can see in my 3-min. video IGF-1 as One-Stop Cancer Shop, as we get older our risk of getting and dying from cancer grows year by year until we hit about 85 or 90, and then cancer risk starts to drop. It seems that centenarians are endowed with a particular resistance to cancer. So what’s their secret?

Every day, 50 billion of our cells die, and every day, 50 billion new ones are born. There’s a balance. Otherwise your body would shrink or get too crowded. Sometimes we need grow, like when we’re a baby or for that growth spurt around puberty. Our cells don’t get larger when we grow up; they increase in number. A child’s hand may only be made up of about 50 billion cells and may have to add half trillion or so while growing up.

Once we’re all grown up, though, we don’t want a lot of extra cells hanging around. We still need our cells to grow and divide, but out with the old and in with the new. We don’t want to be making more cells than we’re putting out to pasture. When you’re a kid, extra growth can be good; when you’re an adult, extra growth can mean a tumor.

How do our cells know when to tip the scale in favor of more dividing with less dying and when to come back into balance? A key signal is IGF-1, a growth hormone called insulin-like growth factor number one. IGF-1 levels go up when you’re a kid so you grow and then come back down when you’re done growing. Should your levels stay a bit too high as an adult, though, there’s a constant message sent to your cells to grow, grow, grow, divide, don’t die, keep going, keep growing. Not surprisingly, the more IGF-1 we have in our bloodstream, the higher our risk for many types of cancer.

When you’re a kid, growth is good, but too much growth when we’re all grown up can mean cancer. In my 90-second video, Cancer-Proofing Mutation, I describe Laron Syndrome, a type of dwarfism caused by congenital IGF-1 deficiency. Those affected don’t have that IGF-1 spurt in childhood so they grow up short-statured, but not having an excess of IGF-1 in their systems as an adult makes them nearly cancer-proof. This raises the question of whether one can achieve the best of both worlds by ensuring adequate IGF-1 levels during childhood and then suppressing excess growth promotion in adulthood. This can be done with a plant-based diet as I described in my last blog posts Cancer-Proofing Your Body and Treating an Enlarged Prostate With Diet, as well as in my 4-min. video The Answer to the Pritikin Puzzle.

Who is Pritikin? See Engineering a Cure. What’s the puzzle? See Ex Vivo Cancer Proliferation Bioassay. The binding protein findings I describe in the video may explain the findings in Is It the Diet, the Exercise, or Both?

For more on IGF-1, I’ve touched on it before in Dairy Hormonal Interference and Meat Hormones & Female Infertility.

-Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here and watch my 2012 year-in-review presentation Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death.

Image credit: The Birkes / Flickr

Tagged cancer, centenarians, dwarfism, IGF-1, insulin, Nathan Pritikin, tumor

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