Cancer, Gratitude Practice & Yoga: Easy Ways To Significantly Improve Your Life

Developing gratitude is a practice and a skill which yoga supports. One way to engage in a gentle practice of gratitude is through the use of mudra. Mudras are hand positions and often called ‘yoga for the hands’. They are gestures which ‘seal’ our intentions or desires by focusing breath and energy into our mudras.

Lotus Mudra is one way to contemplate our gratitude. By joining our hands at the heart-space, we keep the base of the palms joined and touch pinky and thumbs together;  while spreading open our fingers like a lotus flower. The lotus flower is nourished by mud and fed by sunshine.

For cancer survivors, and I am one, this lovely gesture has even deeper and richer meaning. From the murky depth of cancer, there continues to be rays of life and hope. Can we hold both truths in our mind’s eye?

I find that a simple bouquet of flowers goes a long way to nudging my mind toward gratitude.  As we hold the Lotus Mudra, we can fill the container of our hearts by naming our blessings. Practicing gratitude takes less than 3 seconds and this small change can bring big rewards to our immune system.

Cultivating an “attitude of gratitude” depends on feeding the soul. We acknowledge the mud we all swim in, and see that difficult circumstances may bring opportunities, as well. I was talking with a newly diagnosed cancer patient just yesterday. He has been stubbornly independent his whole life. And he told me he was proud of himself for being independent. I told him that cancer diagnosis and treatment was a time to open up receiving help. We don’t “do cancer alone”!

Research tells us that those who have a :

  • Social network, far better during cancer treatment
  • Yoga can help fatigue and sleep
  • More fruits and veggies in our diets is better fuel for our bodies
  • Spiritual practices can be supportive of our immune system
  • Developing coping skills can ease anxiety

Yoga practices are more than postures for the body or asanas. A whole person is mind, body, emotions and spirit. We simply unite these aspects of the human experience with breathing consciously. As we progress, we consciously awaken to our everyday lives and see anew. We needn’t travel to India, yoga’s homeland, or even leave our beds to give gratitude aloud. I am not advocating ignoring the pain that cancer and its treatments bring. I am saying that these muddy waters are rich soul-food which demands we rise above the darkness. That in the midst of hardship, we do not overlook the tenacity of a weed to grow out of cement.

And though I don’t know you, when I give thanks during the Lotus Mudra, I will call your soul by name and include you in my gratitude. We journey together.

About Jean Di Carlo Wagner: Owner of Yogabeing.net
E-RYT200, E-RYT500 certified with Yoga Alliance
Yoga Therapist with International Alliance of Yoga Therapists
Atma Yoga Teacher Training, certified 500 hours Los Angeles
A Gentle Way Yoga, certified 200 hours
Silver Age Yoga, certified 200 hours

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Suggested Cancer Self-Help Healing Books:

 

Inspirational Book For Cancer Patients

Breast Cancer Authority Blog brings you exciting news. A new cancer patient self help book, the ABC Workbook for Cancer Patients: Healing One Letter at a Time, was just released on Amazon.com.  You can get your copy today.  This book is written by a breast cancer survivor times two to help cancer patients have something positive to think about during treatment or while they are in the waiting game.  As cancer patients know, there are long periods of weeks, to wait for results of testing, appointments to see other specialist, and time after radiation and chemotherapy for the three-month PET scan to see if the treatment has been helpful. Waiting to hear is one of the hardest parts of treatment. Speaking of waiting to hear, brings me to another important piece of this cancer journey.  Do you feel heard?

Let’s admit it, cancer treatment is big business.  But I do believe that most if not all oncologist, radiologists, and medical cancer professionals go into this career for the same reason I became a psychologist, to help people.  In the helping people industry, there is a lot of overwhelm, busy schedules and an overload of work to be done, from reading lab results, to consulting with team members and ordering more tests to actually seeing the patient.  It is overwhelming and if you are the 3 o’clock patient that is seeing your doctor (who has yet to grab a bite to eat and has been running on caffeine all-day) you may very well be in that slot that is invisible.  Meaning that, by that time in the day,the doctor is on auto-pilot and your story is blending with the 18 others he/she has already heard throughout the day.  Thus, when you ask your important question, “Will this treatment cause my hair to fall out?”  You may very well hear; most chemotherapy patients lose their hair.  I suggest you buy a wig, if that is bothersome to you.”  Well, that really wasn’t the answer you were looking for.  You were hoping for something more empathic like, “Yes, being concerned about losing your hair is a really important question and I imagine the answer is not one that is going to help you feel comfortable.  Yes, you probably will lose your hair by at least the third treatment.  There are several options that you have for this unpleasant side-effect of treatment.”

Now, this is where it gets a bit tricky depending on how large of a treatment center you are attending.  Many clinics today have a cancer care co-ordinater.  That person is assigned to you to walk along beside of you and answer important questions like, “Will my hair fall out?” Other facilities are understaffed and over-worked (I think they are all over-worked regardless of how many staff they have) and regardless of how hard the staff try, it is difficult for them to attend to your many questions.  Thus, that is why is it is so important that you develop an attitude that you are the captain of your treatment team.  You do the research on line, find support groups, and find key players as your cancer resource team.  From there you get what you need because you pursue the information.  In my book the T letter of the alphabet is TALK.  Ask for What You Need.  That short helpful chapter acts as a reminder and a permission giver for you to use your words to ask for what you need.  You may not always get an affirmative answer, but I promise you will never get an answer if you don’t ask.

I have three cancer related books on the market, In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer, which is a story about what it was like to get the diagnosis and go through treatment in 1999.  Then last year, I published Breast Cancer A-Z Mindful Practices.  It is a great assistant to someone recently diagnosed and in treatment for breast cancer, similar tomy newest book, ABC Workbook for Cancer Patients.  Each book keeps getting better and each one has something to offer to the reader.  I encourage you to check out each book on Amazon.com today.

Suggested Cancer Self-Help Healing Book:

Dr. Robin DilleyDr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer is a licensed psychologist in the State of Arizona. Her eclectic practice allows her to cross diagnostic barriers and meet clients in their need assisting them to respond to life in healthy and empowering ways rather than react to life’s circumstances.

 

Journey to Hope: Leaving the Fear of Breast Cancer Behind

Journey to Hope: Leaving the Fear of Breast Cancer Behind
now available on Kindle!
Click HERE to download.

 Women fear breast cancer more than any other disease. This is true even though a woman in the United States is ten times more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than she is breast cancer. Much of the reason for this fear is that women are told there’s nothing that can be done to prevent breast cancer. They’re told only to get a yearly mammogram hoping to find it at an earlier, more treatable stage. And now, even that’s controversial.

Western medicine is so focused on family history as the overriding risk factor for breast cancer that not much else is ever discussed. But only 25% of all cases of breast cancer occur in women with a family history. What about the other 75%? How can conventional medicine be so dogmatic that breast cancer can’t be prevented when no one knows what’s causing three-quarters of the cases?

Trying to obtain information about breast cancer risk can be as confusing as it is overwhelming. So many questions. So few concrete answers. So much information. So much of it contradictory. Does it matter what I eat? Should I take vitamins? What about stress? Are emotional and psychological factors important? What about toxins in the environment?

The traditional medical view is that none of this matters. But there is much evidence to the contrary. There are simple, reasonable steps you can take that will significantly decrease your risk of developing breast cancer and decrease your risk of dying of it if you have already been diagnosed.

The key to good health and cancer prevention lies more in your own hands than you might think. What you eat, how you feel, what you think, and even what you believe affects your breast cancer risk. The focus of this website as well as my book, Journey to Hope, is self-care, which means learning to do for yourself what the medical system cannot do for you.

My goal is to dispel the current medical dogma that there’s nothing you can do to prevent this disease. The good news is—there’s a lot you can do. The bad news is—your doctor can’t do it for you. You have to do it for yourself.

Dr. Hudson developed a special interest in health and wellness several years ago, especially as it relates to cancer and cancer prevention. His passion is to spread the message of self-care and prevention to women concerned about their risk of breast cancer. He counsels women one-on-one on matters of overall health and wellness, including how the mind-body connection impacts their cancer journey.
Consultation Services
Dr. Hudson is available by appointment for telephone or Skype consultations. Because of his broad experience in breast imaging and breast cancer diagnosis, he can be helpful in a number of ways:

Labyrinth Walking: A Healing Tool For Cancer Patients


Tool For Cancer PatientsLabyrinth
Walking can be a healing tool for cancer patients. In many ways the labyrinth represents the journey to healing. Healing is not only physical but also occurs on the emotional, mental, and spiritual levels. A physical healing is often described as a cure. While a cure might not be possible, healing is always an option. To be healed means to be made whole, and wholeness is fundamentally a psychological and spiritual process of finding meaning. The labyrinth can be used as a tool of healing to help people find meaning in their situation.  You can find more healing tools in the book ABC Workbook for Cancer Patients.

A portable canvas labyrinth can be used and cancer patients are encouraged to walk it as a symbolic journey to recovery and healing. It is suggested that you think about your life from diagnosis through treatment up until the present moment and to relate your journey to the labyrinth walk.

Suggested questions

  1. What is the most important lesson your illness and recovery has taught you?
  2. How has your illness had a positive effect on your life?
  3. How has it affected your relationships?
  4. In what ways are you more whole than before you illness?
  5. What about your illness are you grateful for?
  6. How has your spirit been influenced?
  7. What is required for continued healing?

The path towards healing is not straight and often you feel lost. Perseverance is required to complete the journey. The center represents treatment and the journey out is toward recovery and acceptance. People come and go on the journey. The whole process occurs in the container and context of love and spirit. You feel more connected and relaxed

.Suggested Cancer Self-Help Healing Book:

Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness

In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer 

ABC Workbook for Cancer Patients.

Breast Cancer: A-Z Mindful Practices: Self Care Tools For Treatment & Recovery

5 Ways Yoga Benefits Cancer Post-Treatment Fatigue

Yoga For Cancer Related FatigueIf you’re a cancer survivor and feeling tired or even worse, even long after treatment, you are not alone. About one-third of breast cancer survivors experience this debilitating condition for anywhere from a year to several years post-treatment.

Cancer-related fatigue, (CRF)is very common in breast cancer patients.  Fatigue can often be confused with tiredness. Tiredness happens to everyone. One would expect to be tired  after certain activities, treatments or from daily activities. Sleep and resting is most important when recovering. Fatigue can prevent you from functioning normally and impacts your quality of life.

However, fatigue is an unusual or excessive whole-body tiredness is not relieved with sleep. It can be acute (lasting a month or less) or chronic (lasting from one month to six months or longer).

How To Cope With Cancer-Related Fatigue
The precise reason is unknown, but it may be related to the process of the disease itself or through the chemotherapies and radiation treatments. (CRF) is one of the most common side effects of cancer and its associated treatments. Usually, it comes on suddenly, does not result from activity or exertion, and is not relieved by rest or sleep. It is often described as “paralyzing.” It may continue even after treatment is complete.

What Cancer Patients Can Expect From A Yoga Practice :

  1. women with post-treatment fatigue were still feeling more invigorated than before they started
  2. women become more energized
  3. women see improvement in mood and sleep
  4. women are typically more relaxed, and more aware
  5. women are more accepting of what life brings to them

To Assist Patients As They Cope With CancerUnfortunately there’s no conventional therapy to resolve it, but studies are increasingly showing yoga designed specifically for breast cancer survivors is helping women to catch a second wind. In fact, a recent UCLA study found that three months after beginning yoga, women with post-treatment fatigue were still feeling more invigorated than before they started. Not only do women become more energized, but they see improvement in mood and sleep; they are typically more relaxed, more aware, and more accepting of what life brings to them. All these attributes are so critical as we work toward our continued mental and physical well-being, and ultimately, our healing.  We suggest ABC Workbook For Cancer Patients for additional post-treatment tools. 

 

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us atinfo@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

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Learn What Locally Grown Vegetables Are In Season Plus Recipes

Use The Seasonal Food Guide to learn when & where locally grown produce is in season. Use this guide to pick the best cancer fighting superfoods and add them to your menu this week. Late September features Avocado as an in season superfood and we have included six avocado recipes featured in past on Breast Cancer Yoga Blog.

Avocado Cancer Fighting Information:
Antioxidants and Phytochemicals found in avocados include: Carotenoids: beta carotene, alpha carotene, zeaxanthin shown to inhibit the growth of prostate, breast and head and neck (oral) cancers. Vitamin E is an antioxidant. However, according to Food For Breast Cancer avocados may pose a risk for breast cancer.

Avocado Recipes For A Cancer Free Lifestyle Diet:

  1. Super Delicious Avocado Lime Cake – Dairy & Sugar Free Recipe
  2. Avocado Toast With Veggies & White Bean Salad
  3. Summer Salad Recipe – Quinoa, Spinach & Tomatoes Stuffed Avocados
  4. Easy Sweet Potato, Kale & Avocado Salad Recipe
  5. Kale and Avocado Salad Recipe
  6. Tomato Avocado Soup For Breast Cancer

Eat a Plant-Based Diet of Fruits and Vegetables For Breast Cancer:
make your diet rich in organic fruits and vegetables that are full of micronutrients and bioflavonoids which are duly noted to help prevent breast cancer or other cancers. Five or more servings per day is recommended by the American Cancer Institute. Red and blueberries hold a significant amount of the necessary cell builders and anti-cancerangetic properties that are a necessity on our tables.

  • Look for free recipes on the internet
  • Start by adding healthy food choices to diet –  http://www.healthranger.org/healthtips.html
  • Begin transition to a healthy diet with meatless Monday
  • Begin to eliminate cancer causing foods from your diet

A combination of a healthful diet and physical activity seems to be particularly important, as was shown in the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living Study, which included 3,088 women previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Women who had at least five servings of fruits and vegetables each day and averaged 30 minutes of walking 6 days per week had roughly half the risk of dying from breast cancer, compared with women who ate fewer vegetables and fruits or who were less active.

So a healthful plant-based diet helps in many ways. It makes weight control easier, helps you avoid unhealthful fats, and keeps fruits and vegetables front and center. This combination, along with regular exercise, helps prevent cancer and also reduces the risk of recurrence.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey With Breast Cancer Book Review

Breast Cancer Authority Blog Bestseller Book Review! – In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer

In A Moments Notice - Breast Cancer Authority Bestseller

About The Book

This book is the culmination of Dr. Robin B. Dilley’s poignant journey to wellness after she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1999. Dr. Dilley’s story offers a unique voice, blending her clinical insights with spiritual awakenings along her journey. She describes in detail her emotional struggle to make sense out of the disease and the medical world while showing a strong and solid reliance on her profound spirituality. Her journey introduces amazing characters that she encountered along the way as her life took on new meaning, including the development of her friend and ally, the Tiger.

From the Author

In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer  Finally, I have finished my book about my eleven-year journey with breast cancer. When I was going through treatment I wanted to read someone else’s story, but could not find a book that talked about the ups and downs of treatment and how this disease drastically as well as subtlety changes your life and the lives of those around you. I read thousands of articles, and medical reports, but at that time, I could not find a single book that would talk to me about what it was like. I have now written that book and you can order it now.

About the Author

Dr. Robin B. Dilley is an Arizona licensed psychologist in private practice.She received her doctoral degree from Union Institute in 1992 and has been practicing as a clinician in the field of psychotherapy since 1978. “Psychotherapy for Personal Growth and Redirection” is the heart of Dr. Dilley’s practice, so regardless of what the problem is, there is a solution. The solution is found in the journey, not in the destination.

Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors?

Soyfoods have become controversial in recent years,…even among health professionals,…exacerbated by misinformation found on the Internet.” Chief among the misconceptions is that soy foods promote breast cancer, because they contain a class of  phytoestrogen compounds called isoflavones. Since estrogens can promote breast cancer growth, it’s natural to assume phytoestrogens might too.

But, people don’t realize there are two types of estrogen receptors in the body—alpha and beta. And, unlike actual estrogen, soy phytoestrogens “preferentially bind to and activate [estrogen receptor beta]. This distinction is important, because the 2 [types of receptors] have different tissue distributions…and often function differently, and sometimes in opposite ways.” And, this appears to be the case in the breast, where beta activation has an anti-estrogenic effect, inhibiting the growth-promoting effects of actual estrogen—something we’ve known for more than ten years. There’s no excuse anymore.

The effects of estradiol, the primary human estrogen, on breast cells are completely opposite to those of soy phytoestrogens, which have antiproliferative effects on breast cancer cells, even at the low concentrations one gets in one’s bloodstream eating just a few servings of soy—which makes sense, given that after eating a cup of soybeans, the levels in our blood cause significant beta receptor activation.

So, where did this outdated notion that soy could increase breast cancer risk come from? The concern was “based largely on research that showed that [the main soy phytoestrogen] genistein stimulates the growth of mammary tumors in [a type of] mouse.” But, it turns out, we’re not actually mice. We metabolize soy isoflavones very differently from rodents. The same soy leads to 20 to 150 times higher levels in the bloodstream of rodents. The breast cancer mouse in question was 58 times higher. So, if you ate 58 cups of soybeans a day, you could get some significant alpha activation, too. But, thankfully, we’re not hairless athymic ovariectomized mice, and we don’t tend to eat 58 cups of soybeans a day.

At just a few servings of soy a day, with the excess beta activation, we would assume soy would actively help prevent breast cancer. And, indeed, “[s]oy intake during childhood, adolescence, and adult life were each associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer.” Those women who ate the most soy in their youth appear to grow up to have less than half the risk.

This may help explain why breast cancer rates are so much higher here than in Asia—yet, when Asians come over to the U.S. to start eating and living like Americans, their risk shoots right up.  For example, women in Connecticut—way at the top of the breast cancer risk heap—in their fifties have, like, ten times more breast cancer than women in their fifties living in Japan. But, it’s not just genetic, since when they move here, their breast cancer rates go up generation after generation, as they assimilate into our culture.

Are the anti-estrogenic effects of soy foods enough to actually change the course of the disease? We didn’t know, until the first human study on soy food intake and breast cancer survival was published in 2009 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, suggesting that “[a]mong women with breast cancer, soy food consumption was significantly associated with decreased risk of death and [breast cancer] recurrence.” Followed by another study, and then another, all with similar findings.

That was enough for the American Cancer Society, who brought together a wide range of cancer experts to offer nutrition guidelines for cancer survivors, to conclude that, if anything, soy foods should be beneficial. Since then, two additional studies have been published, for a total of five, and they all point in the same direction. Five out of five, tracking more than 10,000 breast cancer patients.

Pooling all the results, soy food intake after breast cancer diagnosis was associated with reduced mortality (meaning a longer lifespan) and reduced recurrence—so, less likely the cancer comes back. Anyone who says otherwise hasn’t cracked a journal open in seven years.

And, this improved survival was for both women with estrogen receptor negative tumors and estrogen receptor positive tumors, and for both younger women, and for older women. Pass the edamame.

Doctor’s Note

This is probably the same reason flax seeds are so protective. See Flax Seeds & Breast Cancer Survival: Epidemiological Evidence and Flax Seeds & Breast Cancer Survival: Clinical Evidence.

What about women who carry breast cancer genes? I touched on that in BRCA Breast Cancer Genes & Soy, and it’s the topic of my next video, Should Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer Avoid Soy?

What about genetically modified soy? I made a video abut that too; see GMO Soy & Breast Cancer.

Who Shouldn’t Eat Soy? Glad you asked. Watch that video too! 🙂

Not all phytoestrogens may be protective, though. See The Most Potent Phytoestrogen is in Beer and What are the Effects of the Hops Phytoestrogen in Beer?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

How Much Soy Should You Eat To Lower Breast Cancer Risk?

So, we know 7 to 18 servings of soy a day may neutralize some of the beneficial effects of avoiding animal protein. At the same time, studies have repeatedly found that women who eat lots of soy appear to have a lower risk of getting breast cancer, and a better risk of surviving breast cancer than those who don’t eat soy. So is there some magic number of soy food servings we should shoot for?

So far we know that somewhere between 7 and 18 may not be so good, so more than 18 definitely gets the axe. This two year study found no effect on IGF levels of adding two servings of soy foods daily, whether they were tofu, soy milk, soy nuts, or the concentrated soy isolate found in plant-based meats, protein bars, or protein powder; still fine.

Still got a big range here. This study suggested 5 to 10 servings a day was bad— increased IGF—so we’re kind of slowly but surely narrowing down the safety window. Same year in Japan; three servings a day cleared the IGF radar. And then, that’s it. That’s all the science we have so far.

The bottom line is that legumes should be a part of everyone’s daily diet, which means lentils, peas, and/or beans, ideally with each of our meals—of which soy is an excellent choice. But, I recommend that we should probably stick to no more than 3 to 5 servings a day.

Doctor’s Notes

This is the fourth in a string of videos on the role plant and animal proteins play in determining levels of the cancer-promoting growth hormone IGF-1. Also see IGF-1 as One-Stop Cancer ShopProtein Intake and IGF-1 ProductionHigher Quality May Mean Higher RiskAnimalistic Plant Proteins; and Too Much Soy May Neutralize Benefits. For the role soy plays in extending breast cancer survival, see Breast Cancer Survival and Soy. And, I’ve got dozens of other videos on soy.

For further context, be sure to check out my associated blog posts: How Much Soy Is Too Much? and Why Less Breast Cancer in Asia?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

Get your Heart Pumping Doing the Aerobic Bounce on a Rebounder

aerobic-bounce-for-breast-canvcer-recoveryThe aerobic bounce on a rebounder is a simple yet very beneficial exercise that you can do at the comfort of your own home.  Basically, a rebounder is a smaller version of a trampoline, about three feet in diameter, which is not only fun to use, but can also bring about a lot of health benefits if used correctly.

Doing the aerobic bounce on a rebounder provides you with the chance to maximize the benefits and the fun from using a rebounder.  No time? No worries! The aerobic bounce is easy to do, and it will only take a couple of minutes, which is great if you don’t have that much free time.

How to do the Aerobic Bounce

Here are the steps to do the aerobic bounce:

  1. Warm up by walking in place or performing the health bounce.
  2. Stand on the rebounder, making sure that your feet are shoulder width apart.
  3. Keep the knees aligned with the rest of your legs. However, you should also make sure that your legs are slightly bent.
  4. As far as the actual exercises, the sky is the limit. You can try jogging, running or sprinting in place, twists, and jumping jacks to reap the benefits of the aerobic bounce.
  5. Cool down again by walking in place or doing the health bounce.
  6. Continue doing this for approximately 2 minutes. If you want to challenge yourself, try doing these aerobic movements for 15 to 20 minutes.

The great thing about the aerobic bounce is that you only need to allot a couple of minutes per workout, and the exercises don’t put much stress on your joints. Helpful Tip: If you have concerns with keeping your balance, you can add an exercise bar for more stability.

aerobic-running-on-the-rebounder-for-cancer-recoveryAdding Challenges to the Aerobic Bounce
If you want to add more challenge to your aerobic bounce routine, you can mix things up by adding resistance bands or hand weights.

Benefit from the Force of Gravity
If you continue to do exercises on your rebounder, the gravity acting on your body is twice the norm. So, if you weigh 200 pounds, the aerobic bounce will put a gravitational force equal to 400 pounds on your body.  Just keep in mind that you have to maintain a slight bend on your knees to prevent injuries.

Learning about rebounding is an exciting adventure that can offer you many health benefits, and it is also a lot of fun to bounce around for a couple of minutes.

If you want to learn more about rebounding, visit the Rebounder Zone library and find out how rebounding can transform your life!

Be strong, active, and healthy!

 

Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZoneIf you are ready to start a new, refreshing stage in your battle against breast cancer, start rebounding today with these high quality rebounders. Use discount code VICTORY for 10% off all products in our store.

A life of better health awaits you.

Author: Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZone 

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