How Much Soy Should You Eat To Lower Breast Cancer Risk?

So, we know 7 to 18 servings of soy a day may neutralize some of the beneficial effects of avoiding animal protein. At the same time, studies have repeatedly found that women who eat lots of soy appear to have a lower risk of getting breast cancer, and a better risk of surviving breast cancer than those who don’t eat soy. So is there some magic number of soy food servings we should shoot for?

So far we know that somewhere between 7 and 18 may not be so good, so more than 18 definitely gets the axe. This two year study found no effect on IGF levels of adding two servings of soy foods daily, whether they were tofu, soy milk, soy nuts, or the concentrated soy isolate found in plant-based meats, protein bars, or protein powder; still fine.

Still got a big range here. This study suggested 5 to 10 servings a day was bad— increased IGF—so we’re kind of slowly but surely narrowing down the safety window. Same year in Japan; three servings a day cleared the IGF radar. And then, that’s it. That’s all the science we have so far.

The bottom line is that legumes should be a part of everyone’s daily diet, which means lentils, peas, and/or beans, ideally with each of our meals—of which soy is an excellent choice. But, I recommend that we should probably stick to no more than 3 to 5 servings a day.

Doctor’s Notes

This is the fourth in a string of videos on the role plant and animal proteins play in determining levels of the cancer-promoting growth hormone IGF-1. Also see IGF-1 as One-Stop Cancer ShopProtein Intake and IGF-1 ProductionHigher Quality May Mean Higher RiskAnimalistic Plant Proteins; and Too Much Soy May Neutralize Benefits. For the role soy plays in extending breast cancer survival, see Breast Cancer Survival and Soy. And, I’ve got dozens of other videos on soy.

For further context, be sure to check out my associated blog posts: How Much Soy Is Too Much? and Why Less Breast Cancer in Asia?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

Get your Heart Pumping Doing the Aerobic Bounce on a Rebounder

aerobic-bounce-for-breast-canvcer-recoveryThe aerobic bounce on a rebounder is a simple yet very beneficial exercise that you can do at the comfort of your own home.  Basically, a rebounder is a smaller version of a trampoline, about three feet in diameter, which is not only fun to use, but can also bring about a lot of health benefits if used correctly.

Doing the aerobic bounce on a rebounder provides you with the chance to maximize the benefits and the fun from using a rebounder.  No time? No worries! The aerobic bounce is easy to do, and it will only take a couple of minutes, which is great if you don’t have that much free time.

How to do the Aerobic Bounce

Here are the steps to do the aerobic bounce:

  1. Warm up by walking in place or performing the health bounce.
  2. Stand on the rebounder, making sure that your feet are shoulder width apart.
  3. Keep the knees aligned with the rest of your legs. However, you should also make sure that your legs are slightly bent.
  4. As far as the actual exercises, the sky is the limit. You can try jogging, running or sprinting in place, twists, and jumping jacks to reap the benefits of the aerobic bounce.
  5. Cool down again by walking in place or doing the health bounce.
  6. Continue doing this for approximately 2 minutes. If you want to challenge yourself, try doing these aerobic movements for 15 to 20 minutes.

The great thing about the aerobic bounce is that you only need to allot a couple of minutes per workout, and the exercises don’t put much stress on your joints. Helpful Tip: If you have concerns with keeping your balance, you can add an exercise bar for more stability.

aerobic-running-on-the-rebounder-for-cancer-recoveryAdding Challenges to the Aerobic Bounce
If you want to add more challenge to your aerobic bounce routine, you can mix things up by adding resistance bands or hand weights.

Benefit from the Force of Gravity
If you continue to do exercises on your rebounder, the gravity acting on your body is twice the norm. So, if you weigh 200 pounds, the aerobic bounce will put a gravitational force equal to 400 pounds on your body.  Just keep in mind that you have to maintain a slight bend on your knees to prevent injuries.

Learning about rebounding is an exciting adventure that can offer you many health benefits, and it is also a lot of fun to bounce around for a couple of minutes.

If you want to learn more about rebounding, visit the Rebounder Zone library and find out how rebounding can transform your life!

Be strong, active, and healthy!

 

Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZoneIf you are ready to start a new, refreshing stage in your battle against breast cancer, start rebounding today with these high quality rebounders. Use discount code VICTORY for 10% off all products in our store.

A life of better health awaits you.

Author: Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZone 

How To Use Laughter As A Tool For Wellness

Laughing for wellnessTo LAUGH is not LAUGHING matter. LAUGHTER has become a recognized tool in wellness, yoga, and healing. The act of LAUGHING is good medicine, known to release endorphins in the brain, increase blood supply and oxygen levels, and lift a person’s suppressed mood.

  • LAUGHTER causes the lungs to contract and expand and the throat to let go of uptight, rigid quietness.
  • LAUGHING makes the facial muscles relax and spread open, brightening the face.
  • To LAUGH is to express joy, connection, and delight in something that brings a sense of well-being to you.
  • LAUGHTER strengthens your immune system and reduces physical pain while increasing energy to help you move positively into your day.

Norman Cousins, states in his book Anatomy of an Illness that LAUGHING for ten minutes can reduce pain for two and a half hours. I have a link that I am sharing with a challenge for you to click and LAUGH in the privacy of your own home or office. Let your endorphins free to assist you in moving negative and depressed energy out of your body and into a make believe dumpster. Don’t stay heavy one more minute. Click and LAUGH away:Attitude is just a question of weight

LAUGHTER may feel forced when doing LAUGHTER yoga, but so what? So what if you are counting your “ho-ho-ho’s” and exaggerating the noise from your throat to reach for the stars? Who is watching? Part of getting well and taking charge of creating a happy a life for yourself is learning to do new things, take adventurous risks, and break out of old habits. I challenge you to LAUGH today.

Everyone has a different sense of humor and it is important that you discover what makes you belly laugh. I know cancer is serious, but you cannot afford to let it dowse your mood all day long. Your homework is to look for Ted Talks, YouTube Videos, sitcoms, comedy shows, funny home videos, animal shows, funny movies, and late night TV shows and earmark the ones that make you belly laugh. Whether you are having a bad day or not, take a ten minute LAUGHTER break and laugh out loud. If watching I Love Lucy makes you laugh, then watch a marathon of I Love Lucy on a really bad day.

LAUGHTER is not a waste of time. LAUGHTER is the best medicine and you get to choose what kind of LAUGHTER is your medicine. I invite you to wake up each morning and ask yourself, “What am I going to LAUGH at today?”

Dr. Robin DilleyDr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer is a licensed psychologist in the State of Arizona. Her eclectic practice allows her to cross diagnostic barriers and meet clients in their need assisting them to respond to life in healthy and empowering ways rather than react to life’s circumstances.

Best Ever Eggplant Salad – You Must Try This Recipe

Best Ever Eggplant Sald on Breast Cancer AuthorityThis eggplant came to me, like most things, as a surprise. I made some other dish with eggplants, and found out that I have one extra eggplant. I looked at him – dark, firm, brave :-) It was obvious that I have to come up with a new brilliant eggplant salad Idea, and so I did! I didn’t even had to close my eyes… just thought about it and the Idea came :-)

What you need:

1 large eggplant
2-3 handful coriander, chopped well
Juice of 1 fresh lemon
1/2 red pepper, chopped to tiny little squares
2 green onions, both white and green parts, chopped well
3-4 spoons of avocado oil
salt to taste
1/2 tbs maple syrup

What to do:

Peel the eggplants and cut them to small cubes. Stir fry the eggplant cubes in a warm avocado oil. Start on high heat and covered, until the eggplants are done. Then remove the cover, lower the heat and continue to cook until the eggplant is a bit dark and somehow crispy.

Once it’s done, remove to a big plate with towel papers to absorb the oil and cool down. After about 10 minutes blend the eggplants with the rest of the ingredients and YEY – you got an amazing summer salad!!!

Neeva KedemAbout Neeva Kedem: Couple of years ago my life took a nice turn when I became vegan. It happened after my 40th birthday; I kind of realized that my health and energy are not as they used to be, and that change is needed. After reading lots of researches and studies, I understood that eating healthier food that is based on plants and natural ingredients will be the best for me, and so I did. It didn’t happen overnight; first, I gave up red meat. Then chicken, which was very hard for me. And only about a year later – cheese and eggs. Today I can say that being vegan improved my health and energy levels, and that I love being vegan!

Broccoli Versus Breast Cancer Stem Cells

Broccoli Versus Breast Cancer Stem CellsOver the last decade a new theory of cancer biology has emerged, the cancer stem cell. Normal stem cells are involved in organ repair, they travel around the body, sit and wait until there’s some damage, and step in and replace whatever structures are necessary. Lost a little skin here, bone or muscle there, need to regrow a new tooth, these cells are ready and willing. And, the best part, they’re built to last a lifetime. But those same qualities, migration, colonization, proliferation, self-renewal, immortality can be used against us when stem cells go bad and decide to build tumors instead.

Cancer stem cells may explain cancer spread and cancer recurrence. That may be why cancer tends to come back. There may be no cure, only remission. You can have a breast cancer relapse 20-25 years after you thought it went away. Thanks, potentially, to cancer stem cells.

Our current armament of chemo drugs and radiation is based on animal models. If the tumor shrinks, it’s a success. But lab rats only live two or three years. What about all these new fancy therapies like antiangiogenesis, cutting off the blood supplies to tumors? That’s great, but the cancer stems cells may be like “Fine, I’ll go somewhere else and grow another one.” What we need is to strike at the root of cancer, treatments aimed not at just reducing tumor bulk, but rather at targeting the ‘beating heart’ of the tumor, the cancer stem cell. Enter, broccoli.

Sulforaphane, a dietary component of broccoli, and broccoli sprouts, appears to inhibit breast cancer stem cells. Breast tissue, naturally has to have lots of stem cells. Your body never knows when you’re going to get pregnant and need to start making a lot of new milk glands. Researchers recently discovered this compound in broccoli that may destroy cancerous stem cells and keep them from going rogue in the first place.

Estrogen receptor positive human breast tumor; estrogen receptor negative breast tumor. Let’s add some broccoli juice. Going … going… nearly gone. Stem cell hotspots before and after.

Doctor’s Note

Broccoli also protects our DNA. See the preceding video-of-the-day,DNA Protection From Broccoli, and my other 35 videos on greens and 98 videos on cancer. And those are two of the 1,290 topics I cover here at NutritionFacts.org. Note that most of the sources for this video are all open access, so you can click on them above in the Sources Cited section and read them full-text for free.

For more context, check out my associated blog posts: Breast Cancer Stem Cells vs. BroccoliFighting Inflammation with Food SynergyAntioxidants in a Pinch: Dried Herbs and SpicesHow to Enhance Mineral AbsorptionBreast Cancer Stem Cells Versus BroccoliTreating PMS with Saffron, Are Bioidentical Hormones Safe?The Anti-Wrinkle DietIncreasing Muscle Strength with FenugreekHow Tumors Use Meat to GrowMushrooms for Breast Cancer PreventionPrevent Breast Cancer by Any Greens NecessaryFoods That May Block Cancer Formation, and Breast Cancer & Alcohol: How Much Is Safe? 

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

ger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

HOPE: How to Make Decisions From a Position of HOPE

How To Build Build Hope From The Inside OutCertainly at this time of your life HOPE is an important word. Traditional Christian and Jewish stories speak of HOPE ranging from the miraculous conception of the Christ child to the Jewish Hanukkah story of the one day supply of holy oil miraculously turning into the necessary eight day supply needed. Some schools of Buddhism caution about too much HOPE, believing that HOPE sets up expectations. That seems to be the case when people use HOPE in a passive way. One cannot just HOPE that things change. HOPE requires you align yourself with positive action. Be the captain of your ship and do not sit by idly, HOPING things will change. HOPE is needed especially when the chips are down, and it feels like every resource has been explored.

Hope and How to Make DecisionsDeath is not the enemy. We all will die. HOPE can assist us to execute what choices we have about dying. One gift in breast cancer is that you do not die suddenly. You get a chance to say good-bye and let people know how meaningful they have been in your life. It is a fine line walking the balance of HOPE and despair. Despair is never helpful or useful and HOPE helps you stay away from the brink of despair when life is looking fairly bleak. Taking positive action one step at a time helps build HOPE from the inside out. HOPE activates action and action activates HOPE. You have nothing to lose by investing in HOPE. Even if things don’t work out the way you want them to, HOPE helps your mood and keeps despair at bay. HOPE can be practiced and increased when you build positive resources around you.

HOPE is part of feeling empowered. Acting on that empowerment allows you to execute the choices that you have. It is very important you recognize that you do have choices in your treatment options and when you cultivate HOPE in your daily life, then you make decisions from a position of HOPE rather than despair. In the despairing moments it is important to use HOPE to just pass through the despair and move into gratitude and action about the options that you do have.

Reading other people’s stories that are going through what you are going through can fertilize HOPE. Watching biographical movies that tell stories of struggle and success can increase your HOPE thermometer. Going for a walk in nature can uplift your mood and help return HOPE.
HOPE is a tool of positive self-care and I wish you well on your journey with HOPE by your side.

Dr. Robin DilleyDr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer is a licensed psychologist in the State of Arizona. Her eclectic practice allows her to cross diagnostic barriers and meet clients in their need assisting them to respond to life in healthy and empowering ways rather than react to life’s circumstances.

Acupuncture After Breast Cancer Treatment

According to the latest study conducted by the researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, acupuncture is considered a feasible option for women complaining of hot flashes following treatment with estrogen-targeting therapies for breast cancer.

acupuncture-breast-cancer-hot-flashes

According to researchers, acupuncture can be effective on women who had breast cancer treatments and they are experiencing hot flashes.

In the survivors of breast cancer, hot flashes are severe and seen frequently, but the measures approved by FDA  for the treatment of these episodes such as hormone replacement therapy are not suitable for the survivors of breast cancer due to the presence of estrogen. The study results are published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Jun J. Mao, MD, MSCE, an associate professor in the department of community health and family medicine, said that the majority of people relate hot flashes with menopause, this episode may also appear in women surviving breast cancer who are having low levels of estrogen and  usually undergo premature menopause  after being treated with surgery or chemotherapy.

The results of the latest research clearly highlight the promising role acupuncture in the control of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors, which was also proven effective for joint pain in the same population in previous studies.

In general, hot flushes are the transient episodes of flushing, racing heartbeat, sweating and heat sensations. The actual cause of hot flashes is not known though they are closely linked with decreased levels of estrogen.

Study details

The team of researchers have enrolled a total of 120 breast cancer survivors experiencing multiple episodes of hot flashes in a day. The participants were then distributed randomly into four different interventions to check the efficacy of acupuncture technique known as electro acupuncture (embedded needles delivering weak electrical currents) compared to an epilepsy drug gabapentin in reducing the incidence of hot flushes. The participants were given the following treatments for the period of 8 weeks:

  • gabapentin (900 mg) daily
  • gabapentin placebo daily,
  • electro acupuncture twice a week for  two weeks then once weekly
  • “sham” electro acupuncture (involves  no needle penetration or electric current)

After a period of 8 weeks, it was found that participants in the electroacupuncture group have maximum improvement in the standard measurement severity and frequency of hot flashes also known as the Hot flash composite score(HFCS).

Along with the reduction in frequency and severity of hot flushes, both the groups of acupuncture also showed lesser side effects than the pill groups.

The Penn researchers have followed these subjects for another sixteen weeks after the end of the treatment and have observed that both the acupuncture groups enjoyed a lasting and better control over hot flashes, and the pill-placebo groups showed only minimal improvement in the symptoms, Whereas worsening in the hot flashes was observed in the group taking gabapentin.

Evidence from the previous studies suggests that acupuncture works by directly enhancing the levels of endorphins and their associated pain killing and mood elevating molecules.

This article briefly describes the role of acupuncture in controlling hot flashes. You can get details by following the given link.
Source: Acupuncture reduces hot flashes in breast cancer survivors, September 3, 2015

Dr. Adem GunesDr. Adem Gunes has built the world’s largest database of scientifically tested natural substances with proven effects in cancer treatments. In 2009, he was appointed as the Chief Physician of ProLife Clinic in Innsbruck, Austria, and played a key role in the establishment of the research laboratory. He is also the co-founder of the first Austrian hyperthermia center. Now, Dr. Adem works closely with cancer patients from around the world (including Germany, Thailand, Dubai) to recommend them a complementary cancer clinic or to create a personalized care plan for patients to follow at home.

Do You Enjoy Pushing Yourself?

Dr. Kate Master Swim Meet - Breast Cancer Survivor StoryWhat did you do this last weekend? I spent the whole weekend at a Masters swim meet. Sounds super fun doesn’t it. NOT.

I almost didn’t go, but my husband was going to be away, and I figured instead of a weekend at home, my daughter and I could take a trip to Boston. She could play with her cousin, and I could go to the meet. Even still, multiple times I wondered why I bothered to drive to Boston, arrange childcare for the whole weekend, and then spend my precious days off in a pool room.

Truthfully, I have thought about going to this meet for years, but it never worked out for me to go. Or I never wanted to commit to three days away from my family to do it.

I consider myself a swimmer. Swam in high school and college. I dabbled in master’s swimming as an adult. Enjoyed the practices, went to a few meets about ten years ago. Then the practice times changed, and it was harder for me to get there. And, as I mentioned, with a young child, it never seemed to make sense to take the time to go to any meets.

Last fall I decided to focus more on swimming. I have had some issues with fitness and overtraining. Of all sports or fitness programs, swimming is what I know best. I thought it would be a good place to start as I tried to figure out what kind of fitness regimen was going to work for me.

I planned to swim at least three times a week and entered some meets. It was more than a little depressing to see how much slower my times were, even from ten years ago. But I wanted to have some gauge of where I was at and something to shoot for.

I decided to enter a regional meet in Worcester, MA last December. I thought I had been swimming enough and that my fitness had recovered enough so I could expect to improve on my times.Dr. Kate Regional Swim Meet - Breast Cancer Survivor Story

I was wrong. I performed terribly. More importantly, I felt tired and worn out. I was gasping for air on virtually all of my races. It was so disappointing. I wondered if my breast cancer medication (tamoxifen) was interfering with my ability to improve. Or, in addition to forcing menopause upon me, did chemotherapy do some damage to my heart and that’s why I was so winded.

Not that I could do anything about those things. So I stopped thinking about the things I could not control and instead considered what I could do differently. I decided to make some changes. I did not have more time for working out. Instead, I needed to work out smarter.

I changed my swim workouts a little and added more consistent strength and conditioning (CrossFit). Seems to have worked. In fact, I think I spent less time working out in the last few months. Another reminder that more is not always better.

I know I spent less time swimming which was another reason I almost didn’t go to the meet. I figured how could I expect to swim faster when I haven’t been swimming much. I didn’t want another example of my aging body and declining fitness.

But then I decided I’ll never know if the changes I made are making a difference if I don’t test it. If I wait until I know I’m in great shape to go to another meet, I’ll never go. So I signed up. Not right away, but within a few days, I started to regret my decision, started doubting myself.

Why am I doing this? I kept asking myself that question, without a good answer. When I arrived at the meet on Saturday morning, I sat in my car for a few minutes to wrap my head around swimming and the meet; and, to try to answer why I am doing this.Dr. Kate's Breast Cancer Survivor Exercise Story

It’s supposed to be fun, right? Yes. Pushing yourself is fun. Get out of your comfort zone. See what you can do. And it was fun, because I did well. For this meet, I felt strong. I wasn’t winded. I performed well in all of my events.

So different from the meet in December. However, it is because of the meet in December, and my crappy, disappointing results, that I made changes which produced better results. If I didn’t go to the first meet, I wouldn’t have known I needed to do things differently, and if I didn’t go to the second meet, I wouldn’t know that it worked.

So that’s why I compete. Pushing yourself is fun. It’s fun to see positive results. Clearly not all results are positive, though. But better things can come from disappointing results. Poor or mediocre results are not that fun, but are useful nonetheless and can be the reason for success down the road.

Put yourself out there. Be a little (or even a lot) uncomfortable. If you fail, learn from it, make a change and come back to try again. You’ll either enjoy the ride or learn something, and that’s a win-win.

Dr. Kate KilloranDr. Kate Killoran is a board-certified OB/GYN with 15+ years of clinical experience and a breast cancer survivor. Medical school, residency, and clinical practice educated her thoroughly about disease. What her medical education failed to teach her was how to be healthy and well. This she learned from her breast cancer diagnosis.

She practices what she preaches using her knowledge of health, wellness, and disease to help other women be healthy, happy, and well. She sees patients both in her office in beautiful Camden, Maine as well as online at www.drkatemd.com.

For more information or if you’d like to contact Dr. Kate, please visit drkatemd.com.

How To Get Yourself Back After Cancer Treatment

How to get yourself back after cancer treatmentThis past weekend I ran a 10-mile race. I realized afterward that it has been exactly three years since I received the call that changed my life. I remembered this same race, the Mid-Winter Classic in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, three years ago. I did not compete, but my husband did. That year the race was a few days earlier, and I didn’t know what was coming.

I had a mammogram and ultrasound, done two days before, which were both “reassuring”. I distinctly remember waiting for my husband to finish and thinking I had nothing to worry about.

I was wrong, and four days later I knew it. Because of the timing, in my mind, this race will always be associated with my cancer diagnosis. I competed this year for the third time. It is a great race. Well organized, good course. Big enough to be fun, but not so big that the logistics become difficult (making it less fun.)

The first time I ran was two years ago. I had just completed my treatment three months before; and, I had a great day. The weather was warm, for February. I ran well, finished strong and felt good. Since I had lost a lot of conditioning during treatment, I had no real expectations about pace or time and was pleased with an 8:39-minute/mile pace. I even ran the last mile, which is mostly uphill in an 8:08-minute pace. I have never been a fast runner, usually in the middle of the pack. The 8:39 put me right where I wanted to be.

I had come full circle. It had been a year. My treatment was behind me. I felt strong, was able to push myself. I had gone from thinking all I would need was a biopsy, to surviving the full monty of breast cancer treatment and now thriving enough to run a 10-mile race in a respectable time.  I felt like my old self.

After the race, I kept training and pushing myself to get faster. I did another 10-mile race two months later and ran faster. I did a few sprint triathlons and continued to feel strong, fast and improve with every race.

Until sometime in July, when the wheels came off the bus. I was tired and sore all the time. I did some more races. Instead of feeling strong and getting faster, I felt awful and got slower and slower.

In October, I ran a half marathon that was almost a minute per mile slower than I had run in April. I then realized my clothes didn’t fit, and I had gained ten pounds! I was exercising vigorously every day, and yet I had lost fitness and gained weight.

getting back to good health after cancer treatmentI am still figuring out what went wrong. So far I have come up with a few theories. I overtrained and did not let myself recover. I needed to back off, give myself some time to rest, both from my workouts as well as the long year of treatment.

I did not do any strength training. We all lose muscle mass with age and all the training I was doing, without any recovery, accelerated that loss.

Or maybe it was just too much for my poor body which had been through so much with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation.

Whatever the cause, I was out of shape and overweight, despite working out all the time. What should I do now? I needed a new plan. More exercise, or, at least, more aerobic exercise, was clearly not the answer. But what was?

Some discomfort and soreness during and after a workout are good, which is part of what helps you to improve. Knowing when you have crossed the line from a challenging workout to an overdoing it workout is hard. I usually think more is better, now I know that it is not. Frequently, but not always, I can tell when I am doing too much. I listen to what my body is telling me because it does tell me.

It also seems that I needed more strength training. Strength used to be an afterthought. I more or less thought it was a waste of time, and it was the first thing to go if I had time constraints or flagging motivation. Strength and conditioning are now a priority that I make sure to do at least two if not three times per week.

Happily I can report that these changes seemed to have worked!

I ran the race this year 10 seconds/mile slower than I had two years ago. I think that’s a win. Pace aside, I felt strong, I finished well and had fun, which of course should always be the primary goal. So often the fun part gets lost, especially when you have a goal time in mind. This race reminded me that pushing yourself to perform is fun, even when it’s hard, and sometimes hurts.

The last 12-18 months were frustrating after realizing what I did to myself. I learned that my body has changed, I am sure cancer treatment caused, at least, some of that change, but so does age. The good news is that you can still improve even when you are getting older, and even if you have had to suffer through cancer treatment.

Listen to yourself, you can learn a lot.

What obstacles did you have getting back to good health after cancer treatment? Let me know

Dr. Kate KiloranDr. Kate Killoran is a board-certified OB/GYN with 15+ years of clinical experience and a breast cancer survivor. Medical school, residency, and clinical practice educated her thoroughly about disease. What her medical education failed to teach her was how to be healthy and well. This she learned from her breast cancer diagnosis.

She practices what she preaches using her knowledge of health, wellness, and disease to help other women be healthy, happy, and well. She sees patients both in her office in beautiful Camden, Maine as well as online at www.drkatemd.com.

For more information or if you’d like to contact Dr. Kate, please visit drkatemd.com.

ABUNDANCE – Words of Encouragement For Breast Cancer

Abundance - Words of Encouragement For Breast CancerI thought that this year adding a little alphabet soup to my blogs for Breast Cancer Yoga might be a way to keep you encouraged and looking forward to a much shorter article that is written only to give you something to ponder or journal about.

Cancer is a fatiguing disease and even if you have moved on to the “survivor” compartment, it seems there is always that nagging little voice over any symptom that might come up. Whether it is a common cold that won’t go away or a back pain that you know is from lifting to many rocks into that wonderful healing garden, that voice says, “Is this a symptom it has returned?” Thus, cancer during and after treatment is an emotionally fatiguing disease. It is my hope that by having a short alphabetical word from A-Z you are able to focus on positive energy and keep your spirit soaring.

Our first word is Abundance.

ABUNDANCE is really a belief system. Do you operate from a perspective that there will always be enough or do you come from a place of scarcity where quantity can run out and there won’t be enough for you? This is not about that worn out old saying, “Is your glass half-empty or half-full?” It is about the belief system deep down in you. Do you matter enough to be taken care of by the universe? Or for that matter to take care of yourself?

How much food do you throw away from your refrigerator each week? How many extra pair of shoes do you have in your closet? What other things fill your closet and drawer space? Are you are not living in ABUNDANCE with extras, or are you are living in greed, fear and materialism?

ABUNDANCE is having enough not more. The food system may not be able to support us in years to come and then our gluttony might have to come to an end, but there will be enough to sustain us. What do you need to sustain you? Living simply is ABUNDANT living. Living within your financial means is ABUNDANT living! Living on credit card debt is living frivolously and recklessly. Yes, you may have debt from a medical bill that was a necessity, or a set of tires you are paying off for your safety, but if your credit card is filled with department store debt, you are living irresponsibly. If you want freedom then you must live in the ABUNDANCE of enough.

As cancer survivors or people living with cancer, ABUNDANCE may elude us when we are tired, in pain, and sick from the side effects. However, the day-to-day grind can get to any of us. It is important to dig deep within and find that grateful spot that says something similar to, “I hate not being able to taste my food, but I still choose to nourish myself with the comfort and essentials of eating enough to help my body respond to healing.”

2016 has just begun and enough is exactly what we need to experience. ABUNDANCE and ABUNDANCE of gratitude will assist us in the days and weeks to come as we move toward a sense of enough regardless of the circumstances. “All is well within my heart.”

Dr. Robin DilleyDr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer is a licensed psychologist in the State of Arizona. Her eclectic practice allows her to cross diagnostic barriers and meet clients in their need assisting them to respond to life in healthy and empowering ways rather than react to life’s circumstances.

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