Herbal Spring Detox Recipes For Cancer Prevention And Treatment

Herbal Spring Detox Recipes For Cancer Prevention And Treatment

By Patricia Kyritsi Howell, RH (AHG) & Author of Medicinal Plants of the Southern Appalachians.

Spring detoxification herbs known as spring tonics are used now to cleanse the body during cancer.  Many of the best spring tonics just happen to also be the first wild greens, or weeds, that pop up everywhere. You may have already noticed violet, dandelion, chickweed, yellow dock, nettles and others that herald the arrival of spring.

What these plants have in common is that they gently simulate all of the organs of detoxification: the lymph glands; liver; kidneys; and skin. Think of spring tonics as seasonal house cleaners that scour away toxins and waste from every nook and cranny in the body, making everything fresh and new. 

HOW TO DETOXIFY FROM CHEMOTHERAPY AND REPAIR THE BODY

Some cancer patients embark on a juice fast in the spring as a way to eliminate toxins, but since fasting isn’t appropriate for everyone, tonic herbs are a good alternative. If you’ve been ill recently, have been or are taking medications, or are not able to devote the time needed each day to prepare special foods, you can still reap significant benefits this spring using herbal spring tonics.

Spring tonics should be made into a tea, or infusion daily. To prepare a therapeutic infusion, steep one ounce (by weight) of dried herb, or 2 ounces of fresh herb (gently crushed with a wooden spoon), in 32 ounces (by volume) of freshly boiled water for at least an hour, covered. Strain out the herb and discard. Try to drink 1 quart each day. A one-quart canning jar is perfect for preparing tonic infusions.

Detoxification is especially important for immunocompromised diseases such as cancer Here are a two common spring tonics for you to consider. If you can gather them from an unpolluted place, the wild herbs are the best, but both of the herbs described here are also readily available from herb shops and on-line herb suppliers

Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioca) strengthens and supports the entire body. It gently detoxifies all tissues. Considered a blood-cooling herb, it is a specific for anyone with eczema, acne, boils or other hot, eruptive skin conditions. Stinging nettle is a delicious wild green (when cooked) that is rich in chlorophyll, vitamin C, and other vitamins. Use the leaves in place of spinach.

Dandelion Root (Taraxacum officinale) is a general tonic that relieves liver congestion. Symptoms associated with liver congestion include migraine headaches, pre-menstrual syndrome, breast tenderness, breast cysts, and chronic constipation. The leaves are also a wonderful spring tonic when eaten raw in salads.

Patricia Howell

Patricia Kyritsi Howell, RH (AHG) is a clinical herbalist with more than 20 years experience and the author of Medicinal Plants of the Southern Appalachians. A member of the Governing Council of the American Herbalists Guild, she is founder and director of the BotanoLogos School of Herbal Studies, located in the mountains of northeast Georgia.

Learn more at www.wildhealingherbs.com.

Read Related Articles & Resources

Protein-Rich, Salt-Free Pea Soup Recipe For A Cancer Diet

Breast Cancer Authority Blog has an extensive collection of cancer diet recipes. Are recipes focus on protein rich, plant-based, sugar-free and organic ingredients. The amount of protein suggested in a Google search is that a cancer patients should consume 45 – 60 grams of complete protein each day. However, my Mothers nutritionist suggested we feed her 70 grams of protein. Pea protein can be found in plant-based protein supplements and this wonderful pea soup recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 3 Cups Dried Split Peas
  • 7 Cups of Salt Free Vegetable Broth
  • 1 Bay Leaf
  • 1 Teaspoon Dried Mustard
  • 4 Medium Garlic Cloves Diced
  • 3 Stalks of Celery Sliced
  • 2 Medium Carrots Sliced
  • 1 Potato Diced
  • 1-4 Tablespoons Apple Cider Vinegar

Toppings:

  • Sesame oil
  • Diced Tomatoes
  • Fresh Chopped Parsley

Directions:

  1. Place first 5 ingredients in a large pot.
  2. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, and simmer, partially covered for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent split peas from sticking to bottom of pot.
  3. Add onions, garlic, celery, carrots and potato. (You can saute these first with 4  tablespoons of Nutritional Yeast or add them in directly if you want a fat-free soup).
  4. Partially cover and allow to simmer for about 40 minutes, stirring occasionally.(You may need to add extra water).
  5. Season to taste with pepper and vinegar.
  6. Serve with a drizzle of sesame oil, diced tomato and minced parsley.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

 

 

Animal Protein May Play a Role in Cancer Risk

In the two decades between 1990 and 2010, the leading causes of death and disability remained relatively constant. Heart disease remains the leading cause of loss of health and life, but among the diseases whose incidence has increased the most over the past generation is chronic kidney disease. The number of deaths has doubled.

Our “meat-sweet” diet has been implicated in this escalation. Excess table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup consumption is associated with increased blood pressure and uric acid levels, both of which can damage the kidney. The saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol found in animal products and junk food are also associated with impaired kidney function, and meat protein increases the acid load to the kidneys, boosting ammonia production and potentially damaging our sensitive kidney tissue. This is why a restriction of protein intake is often recommended to chronic kidney disease patients to help prevent further functional decline.

Is all protein created equal? No—not all protein has the same effect on your kidneys. Our kidneys appear to handle plant protein very differently from animal protein. Within hours of consuming meat, our kidneys rev up into hyperfiltration mode, dramatically increasing the kidneys’ workload. This is true of a variety of animal proteins—beef, chicken, and fish appear to have similar effects. But an equivalent amount of plant protein causes virtually no noticeable stress on the kidneys. Eat some tuna, and within three hours, your kidney filtration rate can shoot up 36 percent. But eating the same amount of protein in the form of tofu doesn’t appear to place any additional strain on the kidneys.

Why does animal protein cause the overload reaction while plant protein doesn’t? Researchers discovered that after giving subjects a powerful anti-inflammatory drug along with animal protein, the hyperfiltration response disappeared, suggesting the hyperactive response was triggered by inflammation.

Animal protein may also play a role in cancer risk. IGF-1, insulin-like growth factor 1, is a cancer-promoting growth hormone that is released in excess when we eat animal protein. This is presumably why those who eat less meat, egg white, or dairy proteins have significantly lower levels circulating within their bodies within weeks of making the dietary switch. This lowering of IGF-1 levels is thought to be why the blood of men and women eating plant-based diets suppresses prostate and breast cancer growth in vitro significantly better than those eating the Standard American Diet.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Dr. Michael Greger on Breast Cancer Authority Blog

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Learn What Locally Grown Vegetables Are In Season Plus Recipes

Use The Seasonal Food Guide to learn when & where locally grown produce is in season. Use this guide to pick the best cancer fighting superfoods and add them to your menu this week. Late September features Avocado as an in season superfood and we have included six avocado recipes featured in past on Breast Cancer Yoga Blog.

Avocado Cancer Fighting Information:
Antioxidants and Phytochemicals found in avocados include: Carotenoids: beta carotene, alpha carotene, zeaxanthin shown to inhibit the growth of prostate, breast and head and neck (oral) cancers. Vitamin E is an antioxidant. However, according to Food For Breast Cancer avocados may pose a risk for breast cancer.

Avocado Recipes For A Cancer Free Lifestyle Diet:

  1. Super Delicious Avocado Lime Cake – Dairy & Sugar Free Recipe
  2. Avocado Toast With Veggies & White Bean Salad
  3. Summer Salad Recipe – Quinoa, Spinach & Tomatoes Stuffed Avocados
  4. Easy Sweet Potato, Kale & Avocado Salad Recipe
  5. Kale and Avocado Salad Recipe
  6. Tomato Avocado Soup For Breast Cancer

Eat a Plant-Based Diet of Fruits and Vegetables For Breast Cancer:
make your diet rich in organic fruits and vegetables that are full of micronutrients and bioflavonoids which are duly noted to help prevent breast cancer or other cancers. Five or more servings per day is recommended by the American Cancer Institute. Red and blueberries hold a significant amount of the necessary cell builders and anti-cancerangetic properties that are a necessity on our tables.

  • Look for free recipes on the internet
  • Start by adding healthy food choices to diet –  http://www.healthranger.org/healthtips.html
  • Begin transition to a healthy diet with meatless Monday
  • Begin to eliminate cancer causing foods from your diet

A combination of a healthful diet and physical activity seems to be particularly important, as was shown in the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living Study, which included 3,088 women previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Women who had at least five servings of fruits and vegetables each day and averaged 30 minutes of walking 6 days per week had roughly half the risk of dying from breast cancer, compared with women who ate fewer vegetables and fruits or who were less active.

So a healthful plant-based diet helps in many ways. It makes weight control easier, helps you avoid unhealthful fats, and keeps fruits and vegetables front and center. This combination, along with regular exercise, helps prevent cancer and also reduces the risk of recurrence.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors?

Soyfoods have become controversial in recent years,…even among health professionals,…exacerbated by misinformation found on the Internet.” Chief among the misconceptions is that soy foods promote breast cancer, because they contain a class of  phytoestrogen compounds called isoflavones. Since estrogens can promote breast cancer growth, it’s natural to assume phytoestrogens might too.

But, people don’t realize there are two types of estrogen receptors in the body—alpha and beta. And, unlike actual estrogen, soy phytoestrogens “preferentially bind to and activate [estrogen receptor beta]. This distinction is important, because the 2 [types of receptors] have different tissue distributions…and often function differently, and sometimes in opposite ways.” And, this appears to be the case in the breast, where beta activation has an anti-estrogenic effect, inhibiting the growth-promoting effects of actual estrogen—something we’ve known for more than ten years. There’s no excuse anymore.

The effects of estradiol, the primary human estrogen, on breast cells are completely opposite to those of soy phytoestrogens, which have antiproliferative effects on breast cancer cells, even at the low concentrations one gets in one’s bloodstream eating just a few servings of soy—which makes sense, given that after eating a cup of soybeans, the levels in our blood cause significant beta receptor activation.

So, where did this outdated notion that soy could increase breast cancer risk come from? The concern was “based largely on research that showed that [the main soy phytoestrogen] genistein stimulates the growth of mammary tumors in [a type of] mouse.” But, it turns out, we’re not actually mice. We metabolize soy isoflavones very differently from rodents. The same soy leads to 20 to 150 times higher levels in the bloodstream of rodents. The breast cancer mouse in question was 58 times higher. So, if you ate 58 cups of soybeans a day, you could get some significant alpha activation, too. But, thankfully, we’re not hairless athymic ovariectomized mice, and we don’t tend to eat 58 cups of soybeans a day.

At just a few servings of soy a day, with the excess beta activation, we would assume soy would actively help prevent breast cancer. And, indeed, “[s]oy intake during childhood, adolescence, and adult life were each associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer.” Those women who ate the most soy in their youth appear to grow up to have less than half the risk.

This may help explain why breast cancer rates are so much higher here than in Asia—yet, when Asians come over to the U.S. to start eating and living like Americans, their risk shoots right up.  For example, women in Connecticut—way at the top of the breast cancer risk heap—in their fifties have, like, ten times more breast cancer than women in their fifties living in Japan. But, it’s not just genetic, since when they move here, their breast cancer rates go up generation after generation, as they assimilate into our culture.

Are the anti-estrogenic effects of soy foods enough to actually change the course of the disease? We didn’t know, until the first human study on soy food intake and breast cancer survival was published in 2009 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, suggesting that “[a]mong women with breast cancer, soy food consumption was significantly associated with decreased risk of death and [breast cancer] recurrence.” Followed by another study, and then another, all with similar findings.

That was enough for the American Cancer Society, who brought together a wide range of cancer experts to offer nutrition guidelines for cancer survivors, to conclude that, if anything, soy foods should be beneficial. Since then, two additional studies have been published, for a total of five, and they all point in the same direction. Five out of five, tracking more than 10,000 breast cancer patients.

Pooling all the results, soy food intake after breast cancer diagnosis was associated with reduced mortality (meaning a longer lifespan) and reduced recurrence—so, less likely the cancer comes back. Anyone who says otherwise hasn’t cracked a journal open in seven years.

And, this improved survival was for both women with estrogen receptor negative tumors and estrogen receptor positive tumors, and for both younger women, and for older women. Pass the edamame.

Doctor’s Note

This is probably the same reason flax seeds are so protective. See Flax Seeds & Breast Cancer Survival: Epidemiological Evidence and Flax Seeds & Breast Cancer Survival: Clinical Evidence.

What about women who carry breast cancer genes? I touched on that in BRCA Breast Cancer Genes & Soy, and it’s the topic of my next video, Should Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer Avoid Soy?

What about genetically modified soy? I made a video abut that too; see GMO Soy & Breast Cancer.

Who Shouldn’t Eat Soy? Glad you asked. Watch that video too! 🙂

Not all phytoestrogens may be protective, though. See The Most Potent Phytoestrogen is in Beer and What are the Effects of the Hops Phytoestrogen in Beer?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

How to Block Breast Cancer’s Estrogen-Producing Enzymes

The vast majority of breast cancers start out “hormone-dependent,” meaning the primary human estrogen, called “estradiol plays a crucial role in [breast cancer] development and progression.” That’s one of the reasons why soy food consumption appears so protective against breast cancer—because soy phytoestrogens, like genistein, act as estrogen-blockers. They block the binding of estrogens, like estradiol, to breast cancer cells.

But, wait a second. “The majority of breast cancers occur [after menopause], when the ovaries have [stopped producing estrogen].” What’s the point of eating estrogen blockers if there’s no estrogen to block? It turns out the breast cancer tumors themselves produce their own estrogen from scratch to fuel their own growth.

Estrogens may be formed in breast tumors by multiple pathways. The breast cancer takes cholesterol, and, using the aromatase enzyme, or two hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, produces its own estrogen.

So, there’s two ways to stop breast cancer. One is to use “antiestrogens,” estrogen-blockers, like the soy phytoestrogens, or “the anti-estrogen [drug] tamoxifen…However, another way to block estradiol is by using anti-enzymes” to prevent the breast cancer from making all the estrogen in the first place.

And, indeed, there are a variety of anti-aromatase drugs in current use. In fact, inhibiting the estrogen production has been shown to be “more effective” than just trying to block the effects of the estrogen—”suggesting that the inhibition of estrogen synthesis is clinically very important for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer.” It turns out soy phytoestrogens can do both.

Using ovary cells taken from women undergoing in vitro fertilization, soy phytoestrogens were found to reduce the expression of the aromatase enzyme. What about in breast cancer cells, though? Breast cancer cells, too—not only suppressing aromatase activity, but the other estrogen-producing enzyme, too.

But, this is in a petri dish. Does soy suppress estrogen production in people too Well, circulating estrogen levels appear significantly lower in Japanese women than American white women. And, Japan does have the highest per capita soy food consumption. But, you don’t know it’s the soy until you put it to the test. Japanese women were randomized to add soymilk to their diet—or not—for a few months. Estrogen levels did seem to drop about a quarter in the soymilk-supplemented group. Interestingly, when they tried the same experiment in men, they got similar results: a significant drop in female hormone levels, with no change in testosterone levels.

These results, though, are in Japanese men and women that were already consuming soy in their baseline diet. So, it’s really just looking at “higher versus lower…soy intake.”

What happens if you give soymilk to women in Texas? Circulating estrogen levels cut in half. Since increased estrogen levels are a “[marker] for high risk for breast cancer,” the effectiveness of soy to reduce estrogen levels may help explain why Chinese and Japanese women have such low rates of breast cancer.

And, what was truly remarkable is that estrogen levels stayed down a month or two, even after they stopped drinking it. This suggests you don’t have to consume soy every day to have the cancer-protective benefit.

Doctor’s Note

Wait, soy protects against breast cancer? Yes, in study after study after study. Even in women at high risk? See BRCA Breast Cancer Genes & Soy.

Even if you already have breast cancer? See Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors?

Even GMO soy? See GMO Soy & Breast Cancer.

Okay, then, Who Shouldn’t Eat Soy? Watch that video too! 🙂

What else can we do to decrease breast cancer risk? See:

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

How Much Soy Should You Eat To Lower Breast Cancer Risk?

So, we know 7 to 18 servings of soy a day may neutralize some of the beneficial effects of avoiding animal protein. At the same time, studies have repeatedly found that women who eat lots of soy appear to have a lower risk of getting breast cancer, and a better risk of surviving breast cancer than those who don’t eat soy. So is there some magic number of soy food servings we should shoot for?

So far we know that somewhere between 7 and 18 may not be so good, so more than 18 definitely gets the axe. This two year study found no effect on IGF levels of adding two servings of soy foods daily, whether they were tofu, soy milk, soy nuts, or the concentrated soy isolate found in plant-based meats, protein bars, or protein powder; still fine.

Still got a big range here. This study suggested 5 to 10 servings a day was bad— increased IGF—so we’re kind of slowly but surely narrowing down the safety window. Same year in Japan; three servings a day cleared the IGF radar. And then, that’s it. That’s all the science we have so far.

The bottom line is that legumes should be a part of everyone’s daily diet, which means lentils, peas, and/or beans, ideally with each of our meals—of which soy is an excellent choice. But, I recommend that we should probably stick to no more than 3 to 5 servings a day.

Doctor’s Notes

This is the fourth in a string of videos on the role plant and animal proteins play in determining levels of the cancer-promoting growth hormone IGF-1. Also see IGF-1 as One-Stop Cancer ShopProtein Intake and IGF-1 ProductionHigher Quality May Mean Higher RiskAnimalistic Plant Proteins; and Too Much Soy May Neutralize Benefits. For the role soy plays in extending breast cancer survival, see Breast Cancer Survival and Soy. And, I’ve got dozens of other videos on soy.

For further context, be sure to check out my associated blog posts: How Much Soy Is Too Much? and Why Less Breast Cancer in Asia?

If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

Prevent Breast Cancer With These 5 Healthy Lifestyle Choices

Healthy Lifestyle Choices To Prevent CancerNecessary Lifestyle Choices for Optimum Health
An anti-cancer lifestyle will include a variety of exercise, organic foods, clean pure water and air. There are a few easy steps to keep the body safe and healthy. It is important to cultivate an awareness of what feels and taste right going into your body. It is equally important to stop and take notice of bad choices. Ask yourself “Is this good or bad for me? “Will it make me feel better or worse?” We all want to feel alive and vital.

1. Exercise – Yoga
Practicing Restorative Yoga For Breast Cancer Recovery has shown through studies to encourage and improve sleep and to enhance overall quality of life. (Reuters Health) – About one third of breast cancer survivors experience fatigue that affects their quality of life. A new study found that doing yoga might help restore some lost vitality. (bit.ly/sSZeZZ)

There are some simple suggestions to start exploring a change in vitality:

2. Cancer Prevention Foods – Vegetarian/Vegan Diet
It is suggested to eat a plant base diet of fruits and vegetables: make your diet rich in organic fruits and vegetables that are full of micronutrients and bioflavonoids which are duly noted to help prevent breast cancer or other cancers. Five or more servings per day is recommended by the American Cancer Institute. Red and blue berries hold a significant amount of necessary cell builders and anti-cancinogens that are a necessity on our tables.

Here are some simple choices to select from to start improving your health:

3. Water Therapy – Alkaline Water
Alkaline water (referred to as ionized water) can neutralize or decrease the acidity of the body’s pH caused by stress, modern diet, and air pollution. We suggest trying this water and feeling the possible positive effects.

Find a water store and get alkaline water by the gallon (it usually stays charged with negative ions for up to 48hours)
Purchase if possible a home alkaline water system that filters pollutants as well as charging the water with negative ions and anti oxidants

  • Benefit from the many ways to use alkaline water like necessary hydration for the body’s cells

4. Manage Stress – Learn to breathe
Deep breathing is vital in that it encourages the release of body toxins, rebuild healthy tissue which consequently increases overall energy. This true oxygen exchange stimulates digestion, assimilation and elimination. A very important function of breathing fully and slowly is that the body’s natural relaxation response is prompted. This relaxation response results in decreased tension, anxiety and fatigue.

A great place to start is with our single down-loadable breathing exercises or you could do the following.

5. Laugh Often – Emotional Balancing
It has been shown that even when manipulated to smile people in truth feel happier and joyful. Laughter can stop depression right in its tracks and boosts our immunity.

We suggest the following to bring on happiness.

  • Have a daily joke sent to your e-mail
  • Watch funny YouTube videos
  • Listen to the comedy channel on the radio
  • Download comedians from iTunes
Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us atinfo@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Restorative Yoga

4 Reasons Vegan Is Best For Combating Breast Cancer

Naturalist: Corissa Macklin-Rice

Naturalist: Corissa Macklin-Rice

A cancer prevention diet is one that is high in fiber, low in fat (especially animal fat), and includes generous portions of fruits and vegetables. It also minimizes or excludes alcohol. The best diets are pure vegetarian diets.

4 Reasons Vegan Is Best For Combating Breast Cancer:

  1. If you can remove carcinogenicity from the would-be cancer sufferers and thereby the link between environmental and dietary exposures of a multitude of toxins, organic plant based diet would be the obvious “cure”.
  2. Controlled clinical trials to prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that our bodies can benefit from the phytonutrients and antioxidants in fruits and vegetables in the prevention of cancer.
  3. Women believe prevention as doing nothing but waiting for the detection of the disease. the real preventative measures available to women to combat breast cancer, and all cancers for that matter, are available from trusted “authoritative” sources that prove plant based diets prevent cancer.
  4. Vegan diet has been promoted as the most effective weapon in the fight against breast cancer.

Nutrition Journal evidence based research says an anticancer diet would have:

• adequate, but not excessive calories,

• 10 or more servings of vegetables a day, including cruciferous and allium vegetables; vegetable juice could meet part of this goal,

• 4 or more servings of fruits a day,

• high in fiber,

• no refined sugar,

• no refined flour,

• low in total fat, but containing necessary essential fatty acids,

• no red meat,

• a balanced ratio of omega 3 and omega 6 fats and would include DHA,

• flax seed as a source of phytoestrogens,

• supplemented with ~200 μg/day selenium,

• supplemented with 1,000 μg/day methylcobalamin (B-12),

• very rich in folic acid (from dark green vegetables),

• adequate sunshine to get vitamin D, or use 1,000 IU/day supplement,

• very rich in antioxidants and phytochemicals from fruits and vegetables, including α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, vitamin C (from foods), vitamin E (from foods),

• very rich in chlorophyll,

• supplemented with beneficial probiotics,

• supplemented with oral enzymes

Nutrition research has found that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables protects against cancer. (The greatest message is that this same diet protects against almost all other diseases, too, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes.) There are many mechanisms by which fruits and vegetables are protective, and an enormous body of research supports the recommendation for people to eat more fruits and vegetables.

Featured photo: Daily Mail

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us atinfo@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Easy To Make Vegan Dumplings

Delicious and easy to make vegan entrée recipe ideas can be hard to find, it seems like most of the vegan recipes are sides and desserts. We did however find this vegan dumpling recipe, with easy gluten-free wonton wrappers as an example of a great tasting vegan entrée. As with all cancer diet recipes please use organic ingredients when possible.

Vegan dumplings (or pot stickers) with an egg-free and gluten-free wrapper. And they are easy to make and oil-free with only 4 ingredient needed!

  • Yields 15 dumplings
  • 40 min Prep Time
  • 5 min Cook/Chill Time
  • 45 min Total Time
Ingredients

Wrappers

  • 1 cup white rice flour
  • 1/2 cup tapioca flour
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Filling

  • 1 cup chopped mushrooms
  • 1 cup shredded carrots
  • 2 cups cabbage

Sauce (*see note)

  • 2 tbsp coconut aminos (or soy sauce)
  • 1/4 tsp ginger, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tsp cornstarch

vegan-dumplings-for-a-beast-cancer-dietInstructions

Wrappers: Combine all of the ingredients in a bowl. Mix/knead to form a slightly sticky dough.
Divide into 12.
Roll out each ball between two sheets of wax paper as thin as possible.
Stack the rolled wrappers in a bowl with wax paper between each. Cover the bowl with a wet towel. This will keep them from drying out while you prepare the rest.

Sauce: Combine all the ingredients in a jar. Shake.

Filling: Add all the veggies to a non-stick skillet over medium high heat.
Once they begin to sizzle, add about 1/3 cup of water, cover the pan, and let them steam for 4-5 minutes over medium heat till soft.
Remove the cover, add the sauce mixture, and stir until everything comes together and all additional water has evaporated. About 1-2 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool for 5-10 minutes.

To assemble: Remove one wrapper from the bowl with the wax paper that is underneath it. Spoon about a teaspoon of filling into the center of the wrapper.
Fold in half and press the edges together firmly. Optionally crimp the edges. Using the wax paper to do this will prevent the wrapper from sticking to your finger as it is prone to do if they are even slightly wet/moist.
Repeat with the remaining wrappers.

To steam: Fill a shallow pan with enough water to completely cover the bottom. Bring to a boil. Add half of your dumplings. Cover and steam for 5-6 minutes. Remove from the pan. Repeat with the second half.
Serve plain or with dipping sauce of your choice.

Notes

For a super simple sauce option, store-bought teriyaki sauce tastes great too. I really like this soy-free one .

natalie-of-feasting-on-fruitAbout Natalie, founder of Feasting on Fruit: I am the writer, photographer, and imagination behind Feasting on Fruit. Seven years a vegetarian, five years a vegan, and barely one year a blogger, but learning and loving it! I am constantly overflowing with creative ideas for fruity vegan food, often more than I have time to make. Sharing the health and happiness of tasty recipes brings a smile to my lips and a purpose to my kitchen.

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