Quickest & Easiest Way To Decrease Depression Symptoms For Breast Cancer Patients

exercise-for-depression-cancer-treatment-protocolWe’ve known for decades that even a single bout of exercise can elevate our mood, but could it be enough to be used as a treatment for major depression?

We’ve known that physical activity has been associated with decreased symptoms of depression. For example, if you look at a cross-section of 8,000 people across the country, those that exercised regularly were less likely to have a major depression diagnosis. That’s just a snapshot in time, though. In that study, the researcher openly acknowledges this may be a case of reverse causation. Maybe exercise didn’t cut down on depression, maybe depression cut down on exercise. The reason depression may be associated with low physical activity is that people may feel too lousy to get out of bed. What we’ve needed was an interventional study where you take people who are already depressed and randomize them into an exercise intervention.

That is what researchers from Duke University Medical Center did. They randomized men and women over age 50 with major depression to two groups: one who did an aerobic exercise program for four months and another that took an antidepressant drug called Zoloft. In my video Exercise vs. Drugs for Depression you can see a graph of their changes. Before exercise, their Hamilton Depression scores were up around 18 (anything over seven is considered depressed). Within four months, the drug group came down to normal, which are exactly what the drugs are supposed to do. What about the exercise-only group, though? Exercise had the same powerful effect.

The researchers concluded that an exercise training program may be considered an alternative to antidepressants for treatment of depression in older persons, given that they’ve shown that a group program of aerobic exercise is a feasible and effective treatment for depression, at least for older people.

Not so fast, though.

A “group program?” They had the exercise group folks come in three times a week for a group class. Maybe the only reason the exercise group got better is because they were forced to get out of bed and interact with people—maybe it was the social stimulation and had nothing to do with the actual exercise? Before you could definitively say that exercise can work as well as drugs, what we would need to see is the same study, but with an additional group who exercised alone with no extra social interaction. And those same Duke researchers did just that,

They created the largest exercise trial of patients with major depression conducted to date, and not just including older folks, but other adults as well with three different treatment groups this time: a home exercise group in addition to the supervised group exercise and the drug group as before.

And they all worked about just as well in terms of forcing the depression into remission. So we can say with confidence that exercise is comparable to antidepressant medication in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder.

Putting all the best studies together, researchers indicate that exercise at least has a moderate antidepressant effect, and at best, exercise has a large effect on reductions in depression symptoms and could be categorized as a very useful and powerful intervention. Unfortunately, while studies support the use of exercise as a treatment for depression, exercise is rarely prescribed as a treatment for this common and debilitating problem.

Exercise may compare favorably to antidepressant medications as a first-line treatment for mild to moderate depression, but how much is that really saying? How effective are antidepressant drugs in the first place? Check out my video Do Antidepressant Drugs Really Work?

For dietary interventions that may improve mood, see:

Exercise can also help with ADHD (Treating ADHD Without Stimulants) and improve immunity (Preserving Immune Function in Athletes With Nutritional Yeast), not to mention extend our lives (Longer Life Within Walking Distance). But what we eat matters: Paleo Diets May Negate Benefits of Exercise.

In health,

Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United

Ready for a Challenge? Check out the Strength Bounce for Cancer Recovery

Strength Bounce Exercise For Cancer PatientsFor most people, the most difficult of all rebounder exercise routines is the strength bounce. This type of bounce is the most difficult for several reasons.

Regardless of its difficulty, the strength bounce can help in building strength and increasing your stamina.

Simple Goal of the Strength Bounce: Jump for the Heavens!

The goal of the strength bounce is to bounce as high as possible. The higher you bounce, the more gravitational pull you will feel, meaning you will be getting the very best of the health benefits from rebounding.

Why is the gravitational pull important? This increased gravitational pull helps you build your strength and stamina.

You should only try out this exercise if you are physically fit and after you have already tried and made the best of the other rebounder exercise routines such as the aerobic bounce and health bounce.

If you are trying out rebounding for the first time, you should not start with this routine. The strength bounce is best if you are an experienced rebounder and can rebound comfortably for 20 minutes or more.

If you are not ready for the Strength Bounce, what are your Alternatives?

Before you try the strength bounce technique, you should try these other routines first:
Aerobic Bounce. This one relies entirely on what your body can do. Some questions to consider are:

  • How fast you want your bounces to be?
  • How high you should go?
  • How much time you would like to devote to this activity?

The aerobic bounce helps build up stamina and strength for more difficult exercises such as the strength bounce.

Health Bounce. This exercise is essentially considered as a warm up or cool down exercise, flushing out toxins and preparing you for more difficult exercises afterwards. This what you need to do:

  • Start by setting your feet a shoulder’s width apart
  • Jump from your trampoline with only your heels leaving the ground.
  • Do this exercise for approximately two minutes in order to get the best results.

You can either wear shoes or go barefoot when training on a trampoline, so choose which one you are more comfortable with.

Why should you Rebound?

There are a plethora of health benefits of rebounding. The most obvious benefits of rebounding include:

  • More energy
  • Improved bone health and density
  • Detoxification of toxins
  • Improved immune function
  • Increased lymph flow

Strenght Bounce & Cancer RecoverySource: https://www.psychologies.co.uk/how-bounce-back
If you want to go further with your workout, you can do several things to add challenge to your rebounding routine, such as:

  • Adding hand weights to increase the gravitational pull on your body
  • Using resistance bands for strength training
  • Increasing your jump pace and overall time of your rebounding workout

Keep in mind that pushing your boundaries should be done in moderation in order to prevent overexertion or even injury.

Ready to Transform your Health?

If you want to learn more about rebounding, visit the Rebounder Zone library and find out how rebounding can transform your life!

Photo source: Featured image, leaping image

Be strong, active, and healthy!

Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZoneIf you are ready to start a new, refreshing stage in your battle against breast cancer, start rebounding today with these high quality rebounders. Use discount code VICTORY for 10% off all products in our store.

A life of better health awaits you.

Author: Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZone 

Sports & Exercise as it Relates to Breast Cancer Survivors

Sports & Exercise as it Relates to Breast Cancer SurvivorsCancer patients often wonder whether or not they should be exercising after being treated for cancer. Some people believe that exercise helps cancer patients, while others believe they should be more restful.

One research study (1) looked into the effect of exercise and sports in patients suffering from breast cancer. They combined the results of 51 other studies that evaluated the physiological and psychological effects that exercise had on these breast cancer survivors. They found that sports and exercise were safe to undergo in breast cancer survivals and that they uniformly did better about their physical and mental health.

With this data, they concluded that breast cancer patients should be encouraged to exercise after their treatment for cancer.

Source: 1. Battaglini, CL, et al. Twenty-five years of research on the effects of exercise training in breast cancer survivors: A systematic review of the literature. World J Clin Oncol. 2014 May 10; 5(2): 177–190.

Dr. Adem Gunes Dr. Adem Gunes has built the world’s largest database of scientifically tested natural substances with proven effects in cancer treatments. In 2009, he was appointed as the Chief Physician of ProLife Clinic in Innsbruck, Austria, and played a key role in the establishment of the research laboratory. He is also the co-founder of the first Austrian hyperthermia center. Now, Dr. Adem works closely with cancer patients from around the world (including Germany, Thailand, Dubai) to recommend them a complementary cancer clinic or to create a personalized care plan for patients to follow at home.

Don’t Let Age or Injury Hinder Your Commitment to Exercise: Doing the Sitting Bounce on Your Rebounder

Breast Cancer & Lymphedema Exercise on the Rebounder

Don’t Let Age or Injury Hinder your Commitment to Exercise: Doing the Sitting Bounce on Your Rebounder

It is true that we should not let anything prevent us from ensuring that we remain strong and healthy, which is why the sitting bounce on a rebounder trampoline is one of the best exercises that you can do.

Even if your body has been weakened due to illness, age, or an injury, you can use this exercise to increase your strength and energy.

There are many rebounder exercise routines that almost anyone can do.

However, one of the most age-neutral exercise routines would have to be the sitting bounce, which is an exercise that you can do even if you suffer from injuries that prevent you from doing typical exercises.

How to do the Sitting Bounce on your Rebounder 
If you want to try out the sitting bounce routine for yourself, here are the steps that you should take:

  1. Begin by sitting on your rebounder’s jump mat. It is best to have a workout buddy with you if you are still recovering from a serious injury.
  2. Not only will having a partner make it easier for you to get started, he or she will also help to make sure that you don’t accidentally fall off the trampoline and hurt yourself.
  3. Your guide should stand right behind you to assist you in doing your bounce. You will need to be in constant contact with your partner during this exercise.
  4. Once you have your partner positioned behind you, lift your hands up and have your partner hold them up for you.
  5. Now that you are in position, start bouncing. Try lifting yourself, with the help of your partner, and once you have reached your peak bounce height, allow yourself to fall back onto the trampoline.
  6. Do as many repetitions as you can for two to three minutes.

Benefits of the Sitting Bounce for Seniors

  • The great thing about the sitting bounce is that it helps eliminate the toxins accumulated inside your body through sweating without putting a lot of stress on your joints.
    This is great if you suffer from arthritis or any other ailment that causes painful inflammation in your joints.
  • In addition to reducing stress on your joints, the sitting bounce also works well when it comes to improving your core muscle group, which includes your back, abdominal region, and legs.
  • Continuously doing the sitting bounce will strengthen your core muscles, which in turn will allow you to do more strenuous exercises, such as the health bounce, without any risk of injury.

Ready to Get Moving with the Sitting Bounce?
So, if you intend to make yourself feel better and stronger regardless of your age or injury history, you can start by doing the beneficial sitting bounce routine with a friend.

Doing these bounce exercises can help you regain your strength, and even improve upon it.

If you want to be stronger and healthier with the help of a rebounder, you can look up even more techniques to enjoy by visiting the Rebounder Zone library.

Picture Source: http://cellercise.com/2016/05/27/three-basic-rebounding-exercises/

Be strong, active, and healthy!

Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZoneIf you are ready to start a new, refreshing stage in your battle against breast cancer, start rebounding today with these high quality rebounders. Use discount code VICTORY for 10% off all products in our store.

A life of better health awaits you.

Author: Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZone 

How is your Lymphatic System Connected with Cancer?

How is your Lymphatic System Connected with Cancer?Are you living with or at high risk for breast cancer? Did you know there are certain habits and exercises you can use to strengthen your body’s response to breast cancer? Not only will these habits and exercises help prevent and self treat breast cancer, but they will also benefit your health in a myriad of other ways.

In this article, I will detail exactly what these habits and exercise are. But, before I go that far, let’s start with the base: your lymphatic system.

What is the Lymphatic System?

Why your Lymphatic System is Critical to your Overall HealthThe lymph system is a network of nodes, organs, and lymph vessels. Your lymph system consists of your adenoids, liver, lymph fluid, lymph nodes, lymphatic vessels, spleen, thymus, thoracic duct,  and tonsils. Working in harmony, your lymph system’s components absorb excess fluid from the body and return that fluid to your bloodstream. These components also absorb fat in your small intestine and boost your immune system.

Why your Lymphatic System is Critical to your Overall Health

A healthy, well-functioning lymph system serves several critical functions for your health and wellness, including:

    • Balance of proteins in your tissues’ fluids
    • Diffusion and circulation of nutrients such as Vitamin A, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, and Vitamin K from your red blood cells.
    • Regulation of your blood pressure

The most important reason to have a healthy lymph system?: A strong lymph system provides protection from harmful toxins and bacteria.

Now that you understand the importance of your lymph system, let’s explore how it is connected with cancer.

How is your Lymphatic System Connected with Cancer?

As mentioned above, your lymph system serves as a critical line of defense for your body’s immunity. In this defense, your lymphatic system destroys old or abnormal cells, such as cancer cells.

Details on How your Lymph System Removes Cancerous Cells

This is a high level overview on how cancerous cells are removed from your body:

Blood circulates throughout your body.

      1. As your blood flows, fluid leaks from your blood vessels to your body tissues.
      2. This excess fluid delivers food to your cells and forms tissue fluid with your body’s tissues.
      3. At this point, this excess fluid picks up bacteria, waste products, and damaged or abnormal cells, including cancerous cells.
      4. After this “garbage collection”, the fluid drains into your lymph vessels.

Next, your lymph fluid flows through your lymph vessels and lymph glands, filtering out those nasty cancerous cells along the way.

The most important habit you can adopt? Get moving and exercise! Your lymph system doesn’t have a pump to stimulate lymph movement; therefore, you have to get that lymph moving manually. The best way to do this is via exercise, but not just any exercise.

Learn more below:

Get Moving to Boost your Lymph Flow

Any vertically oriented exercise is best for your lymph system. So, your go to exercises should be downward dogs, jumping jacks, or headstands. Certain physical limitations, however, can make these types of exercises uncomfortable, painful, or even impossible. For these reasons, bouncing on a trampoline, or rebounding, is the most effective workout you can give your lymph system. Check out the next section to learn why.

The Best Exercise for your Lymphatic System: Rebounding!

The Best Exercise for your Lymphatic System- Rebounding!What is Rebounding? Rebounding is a great exercise that helps you satisfy all four essential elements of exercise: aerobic capacity, endurance, flexibility, and strength. Rebounding increases the flow of oxygen to all cells in your body, and the exercise can help you become healthier, stronger, and help your body become more capable of effectively fighting disease.

What Equipment is Needed to Rebound?All you need is a high quality rebounder trampoline, or exercise trampoline, to rebound! If you need more stability during your bounces, you can also purchase a stability bar with most rebounder models. For more info on what to look for when shopping for a rebounder, check out this detailed rebounder trampoline buyer’s guide.

Even if you rebound regularly, you still need to maintain a balanced, nutritious diet, get proper rest, avoid negative behaviors such as drug use, and get proper treatment for states detrimental to your health such as stress, anxiety, and depression.

Due to its positive impact on not only your lymph system but a variety of other bodily systems, rebounding is the best exercise to invigorate your body’s lymph flow.

Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZoneIf you are ready to start a new, refreshing stage in your battle against breast cancer, start rebounding today with these high quality rebounders. Use discount code VICTORY for 10% off all products in our store.

A life of better health awaits you.

Author: Leonard Parker, Owner of RebounderZone 

Been Diagnosed With Cancer – When Do You Start To Exercise?

So you’ve been diagnosed with cancer and you want me to exercise?!So you’ve been diagnosed with cancer and you want me to exercise?! I heard this frequently when I approached ovarian cancer patients in chemotherapy clinics to participate in my research. I would sometimes sit for hours in the waiting rooms just to wait for a two minute conversation with a patient, in the hope to assist them to become more active.

I have no doubt that being diagnosed with cancer and having treatment is one of the most challenging things a person can ever go through, and without having cancer myself, i cannot act like I know what they are going through. However, what I do know – an emerging field of exercise oncology – the majority of patients, families and a lot of doctors do not know about. More and more support has been given by oncologists to tell their patients to be active and get moving, when in the past they were wrapped in cotton wool and told to rest. In fact, this has been shown in prospective studies for patients when asked how much they exercised, the ones who engaged in more, lived for longer.

Now going back to the original theme of when do you start to exercise? before or after surgery? during chemo? after chemo?

The answer is now.

Think of it this way – the healthier your body is from being active, the better you will recover from surgery, the stronger you will be during chemo and the more likely you will be back and feeling normal after treatment.

I’ve spoken with oncologists from around Australia and the world and I have told them exactly that. There have been studies for patients before surgery, during chemo and radiotherapy and after treatment, all showing benefits from increased aerobic activity (walking, cycling, aqua aerobics etc) and resistance training (weights).

The time to be active is now.

  1. A 5 minute walk around the block a day to start your regime.
  2. Next week aim at 10 minutes a day.
  3. The week after aim at 15 minutes.
  4. Before you know it, you have a larger endurance capacity, more energy and vitality again.
  5. Believe you can do it, because you can.

Please feel free to pass this blog onto any cancer survivor.

David Mizrahi About David Mizrahi: David currently works as a Clinical Research Associate at The Sydney Children’s Hospital. David is an Accredited Exercise Physiologist and received a Master of Science from the University of New South Wales.

Advice For Contacting David: Interested in consulting with oncology patients, as well as setting up exercise-based programs in hospitals and oncology clinics. Contact me for more information – E: d.mizrahi@unsw.edu.au or M: 0404177629.

The Chromosomal Link Between Breast Cancer Risk and Obesity Found!

A recent study has found the chromosomal link that helps reduce or increase the risk for breast cancer through a mechanism that controls the weight of the woman.

Recently, research was conducted to study the link between weight loss, body fat and the length of a certain chromosome in the women with breast cancer.

It is well documented that maintaining a healthy weight through regular exercises, and a healthy diet are the keys to cancer prevention and management. However, the exact mechanism through which these factors work was not fully known.

Researchers at the Yale Cancer Center have found an explanation for this link in the small ends of a chromosome called telomeres. These findings will be presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium on December 11, 2015.

The research was based on a previously published study conducted at the Yale called LEAN that examined how weight loss through healthy lifestyle changes was linked with the telomere length in the breast cancer survivors who enrolled in a weight-loss program. It was found that the telomeres shortened with each cell division and were also associated with faster aging and an increased risk of mortality in the breast cancer patients.

The Yale study further explored the link between telomere length and weight loss in the breast cancer survivors. The research concluded that telomeres in the breast cancer survivors who had lost weight through regular exercise and a healthy diet were slower to shorten.

“It was also found that the telomere shortening was reversed in some cases when the women followed a healthy diet and lost weight,” said the first author of the study, Dr. Tara Sanft, the assistant professor of medical oncology.

“The results indicate that a higher body fat level could be associated with a shorter telomere length. Also, weight loss was strongly associated with an increase in the length of the telomere,” Sanft said. “This indicates that the length of telomere could be a mechanism through which the relationship between breast cancer risk and mortality and obesity is mediated.”

The senior author of the study, Melinda Irwin, said, “A growing body of scientific research linking lifestyle factors like exercising and maintaining a healthy weight with an improved breast cancer treatment success and survival is compelling.”

“With the findings of exercise and weight loss improving the mechanisms associated with breast cancer mortality and treatment success, a shift in the management of breast cancer patients that includes increased access to lifestyle behavioral counseling is expected,” Irwin said.

Meanwhile, new guidelines have been recommended by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Cancer Society. The women who have undergone lumpectomy for the removal of a cancerous lesion in the breast or mastectomy are advised to have regular follow ups with annual mammograms. Mammograms are not required for the women who have undergone reconstruction of the breasts. MRIs are also not recommended except in cases of high-risk factors.

Following these guidelines and maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise can improve the chances of survival of breast cancer patients substantially.

Find more about “Alternative ways of cancer treatment” for breast cancer on our website.

References:

1. Study links body fat, weight loss, and chromosome length in breast cancer patients
2. New follow-up care guidelines released for breast cancer survivors
3. Yale study explores breast cancer/weight loss link

Featured Photo Source: Ken Borsuk / Hearst Connecticut Media

Dr. Adem Gunes

Dr. Adem Gunes has built the world’s largest database of scientifically tested natural substances with proven effects in cancer treatments. In 2009, he was appointed as the Chief Physician of ProLife Clinic in Innsbruck, Austria, and played a key role in the establishment of the research laboratory. He is also the co-founder of the first Austrian hyperthermia center. Now, Dr. Adem works closely with cancer patients from around the world (including Germany, Thailand, Dubai) to recommend them a complementary cancer clinic or to create a personalized care plan for patients to follow at

Exercise – Important For The Breast Cancer Recovery Process

Exercise for Breast Cancer RecoveryLack of exercise is not what caused your cancer, so relax. If that were the case, the cancer rates would be so much larger. However, EXERCISE is very important to the recovery process and is also helpful in bringing the best attitude forward for the healing process. Coming eyeball to eyeball with cancer changes the perspective of quality of life. Thus, most of us are willing to do things for our own good in ways that we were not willing to before. Some of us love to EXERCISE and can’t wait to get to the gym or on our mountain bike. Others of us hate EXERCISE and have to be forced into doing it. I would wager that those of us who hate EXERCISE are EXERCISING for the wrong reasons and doing particular EXERCISES that we hate. So there are two goals here. First, discover an exercise you like or can tolerate because you feel good afterward. Second, set up your goal for your success.

If you are still in treatment your energy is lower but sitting or staying in bed all day only causes the toxins to build up. Walk for 10 minutes, or try walking 5 minutes a few times a day. Stretch. Lie in bed and move your body gently. Breathe. Yes, breathing is a form of exercise and Breast Cancer Yoga has a wonderful breathing CD. As you begin feeling better try Breast Cancer Yoga’s exercises for Yoga that are designed just for you, gentle lymphatic stretching. Get out of the house if even to just sit on the porch. Being outside moves your cells and allows them to enjoy fresh air versus the stale air from your AC or furnace. Listen to music and imagine yourself dancing to it and then gently move your muscles as if your muscles are dancing.

Post-treatment allow yourself to build up to 30 minutes of exercise a day. Start by doing 15 minutes, five days a week, then increase to two days for 3O minutes and continue to build up from there. Even though the lack of EXERCISE did not cause your cancer, let me be clear, EXERCISE, whether you like it or not, is important to your health. Thus, establish an EXERCISE habit as soon as possible after treatment so that it becomes a part of your new healthy lifestyle. The only rule needed is to EXERCISE at least thirty minutes a day whether you like it or not. The simplest way is to walk. Other than a good pair of shoes, walking EXERCISE does not require anything else and almost everyone can do it. If you can’t walk, then you need to discover other ways to EXERCISE. Stretching is a good choice and it does not require any fancy equipment. Yoga is also a great choice because it allows your body to detox the lymph system allowing those mutant cells to keep moving out of your body rather than getting stagnant and begin to build new tumors. Learning to make EXERCISE a part of your daily routine is a very important part of self-care. The goal is to EXERCISE more days a week than not. EXERCISE will help you stay flexible and healthy as you age. It is simple. The only goal is to do it. Don’t do it to lose weight, do it because you love yourself and because you are important.

Family members, it is not only important that you support your family member in an EXERCISE routine but that you too stay healthy by finding an EXERCISE activity that you enjoy and get out there and do it. Making EXERCISE a family affair will make it something fun and something to look forward to.

Last, when you get bored, change it out. If you get sick and can’t for a few days, get right back out there. If you miss a day, dance inside for 15 minutes anyway. MOVE your body as much as you can everyday.

Featured Photo Source: St. Louis Dispatch

Dr. Robin DilleyDr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer is a licensed psychologist in the State of Arizona. Her eclectic practice allows her to cross diagnostic barriers and meet clients in their need assisting them to respond to life in healthy and empowering ways rather than react to life’s circumstances.

How To Get Yourself Back After Cancer Treatment

How to get yourself back after cancer treatmentThis past weekend I ran a 10-mile race. I realized afterward that it has been exactly three years since I received the call that changed my life. I remembered this same race, the Mid-Winter Classic in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, three years ago. I did not compete, but my husband did. That year the race was a few days earlier, and I didn’t know what was coming.

I had a mammogram and ultrasound, done two days before, which were both “reassuring”. I distinctly remember waiting for my husband to finish and thinking I had nothing to worry about.

I was wrong, and four days later I knew it. Because of the timing, in my mind, this race will always be associated with my cancer diagnosis. I competed this year for the third time. It is a great race. Well organized, good course. Big enough to be fun, but not so big that the logistics become difficult (making it less fun.)

The first time I ran was two years ago. I had just completed my treatment three months before; and, I had a great day. The weather was warm, for February. I ran well, finished strong and felt good. Since I had lost a lot of conditioning during treatment, I had no real expectations about pace or time and was pleased with an 8:39-minute/mile pace. I even ran the last mile, which is mostly uphill in an 8:08-minute pace. I have never been a fast runner, usually in the middle of the pack. The 8:39 put me right where I wanted to be.

I had come full circle. It had been a year. My treatment was behind me. I felt strong, was able to push myself. I had gone from thinking all I would need was a biopsy, to surviving the full monty of breast cancer treatment and now thriving enough to run a 10-mile race in a respectable time.  I felt like my old self.

After the race, I kept training and pushing myself to get faster. I did another 10-mile race two months later and ran faster. I did a few sprint triathlons and continued to feel strong, fast and improve with every race.

Until sometime in July, when the wheels came off the bus. I was tired and sore all the time. I did some more races. Instead of feeling strong and getting faster, I felt awful and got slower and slower.

In October, I ran a half marathon that was almost a minute per mile slower than I had run in April. I then realized my clothes didn’t fit, and I had gained ten pounds! I was exercising vigorously every day, and yet I had lost fitness and gained weight.

getting back to good health after cancer treatmentI am still figuring out what went wrong. So far I have come up with a few theories. I overtrained and did not let myself recover. I needed to back off, give myself some time to rest, both from my workouts as well as the long year of treatment.

I did not do any strength training. We all lose muscle mass with age and all the training I was doing, without any recovery, accelerated that loss.

Or maybe it was just too much for my poor body which had been through so much with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation.

Whatever the cause, I was out of shape and overweight, despite working out all the time. What should I do now? I needed a new plan. More exercise, or, at least, more aerobic exercise, was clearly not the answer. But what was?

Some discomfort and soreness during and after a workout are good, which is part of what helps you to improve. Knowing when you have crossed the line from a challenging workout to an overdoing it workout is hard. I usually think more is better, now I know that it is not. Frequently, but not always, I can tell when I am doing too much. I listen to what my body is telling me because it does tell me.

It also seems that I needed more strength training. Strength used to be an afterthought. I more or less thought it was a waste of time, and it was the first thing to go if I had time constraints or flagging motivation. Strength and conditioning are now a priority that I make sure to do at least two if not three times per week.

Happily I can report that these changes seemed to have worked!

I ran the race this year 10 seconds/mile slower than I had two years ago. I think that’s a win. Pace aside, I felt strong, I finished well and had fun, which of course should always be the primary goal. So often the fun part gets lost, especially when you have a goal time in mind. This race reminded me that pushing yourself to perform is fun, even when it’s hard, and sometimes hurts.

The last 12-18 months were frustrating after realizing what I did to myself. I learned that my body has changed, I am sure cancer treatment caused, at least, some of that change, but so does age. The good news is that you can still improve even when you are getting older, and even if you have had to suffer through cancer treatment.

Listen to yourself, you can learn a lot.

What obstacles did you have getting back to good health after cancer treatment? Let me know

Dr. Kate KiloranDr. Kate Killoran is a board-certified OB/GYN with 15+ years of clinical experience and a breast cancer survivor. Medical school, residency, and clinical practice educated her thoroughly about disease. What her medical education failed to teach her was how to be healthy and well. This she learned from her breast cancer diagnosis.

She practices what she preaches using her knowledge of health, wellness, and disease to help other women be healthy, happy, and well. She sees patients both in her office in beautiful Camden, Maine as well as online at www.drkatemd.com.

For more information or if you’d like to contact Dr. Kate, please visit drkatemd.com.

FREE Exercise Program E-Books For (Breast) Cancer Treatment & Recovery

Exercise Guide To Cancer Treatments & Recovery BooksNumerous studies have examined the role of physical activity and exercise during and following cancer treatment, yet exercise is not generally incorporated into cancer care or discussed with cancer patients. Significant reductions in physical activity have been observed in women diagnosed with breast cancer. The evidence suggests patients should be encouraged to exercise after being diagnosed with cancer. To get you started we have included 2 FREE E-books to help you begin an exercise program.

Cancer Exercise Guide
Cancer Exercise Guide

Click Here To Download

The aim of this booklet is to teach you a simple exercise programme and give you advice about staying active and improving your fitness. This will help you to improve your quality of life during and after treatment for cancer.
During chemotherapy and radiotherapy many people have muscle weakness, stiffness and fatigue because of their cancer or from the treatment.
The fatigue can be severe and limits activity. Inactivity leads to muscle wasting and loss of function.
When you are in hospital, wearing your own clothes may help you to feel more ‘normal’ and add to your general well-being. It is also a good idea to sit out of bed as often as possible and try to take short walks during the day. This can help with your breathing, blood pressure, digestion, core stability and mood.

Exercise After Beast Surgery-A guide for women
This guide is for women who have had surgery for breast cancer.Breast cancer is mainly a disease in women, but each year a small number of men are also diagnosed with the disease. We often refer to women in the text, but men who have had surgery for breast cancer may find the information in this booklet helpful.
Exercise-after-breast-surgery-A-guide-for-women

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Exercise is an important part of your treatment and recovery after surgery for breast cancer. It can help you:
  • begin your daily activities again (such as bathing and dressing)
  • maintain movement in your arm and shoulder
  • improve muscle tone
  • decrease joint stiffness
  • reduce pain in the neck and back area
  • improve your overall well-being
Everyone is different and heals at their own pace. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team before starting the exercises in this booklet, and let them know about your progress. The timelines suggested are only to guide you. Some exercises can be started right after surgery. Exercises that involve moving your shoulders and arms can usually be started once you’ve had your drain removed. Strengthening and general conditioning exercises can be added to your routine when you’ve healed more.

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About Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

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