Protein Rich Raspberry Coconut Mousse (Vegan & Sugar Free)

This surprisingly good and easy to make fruit flavored mousse is for perfect for breast cancer patients. This recipe includes red raspberries that are reported to help fight cancer and protein to help support cancer treatment recovery.  As always try to use organic ingredients when possible.

Ingredients

  • 1 Can coconut milk without guar gum, refrigerated overnight
  • 1 Cup fresh red raspberries
  • 2 -3  Tbsp. raspberry spreadable fruit (Polaner)
  • 1 Scoop protein powder

Direction

  1. In a small blender or food processor , blend the raspberries.
  2. Open the chilled can of coconut milk and scoop off the white fatty part. Place it in a bowl . (You can save the remaining water for smoothies.)
  3. Using a whipping attachment on your mixer , whip the coconut milk into a cream. Then slowly add the blended raspberries, raspberry spreadable fruit and protein powder. Whip until everything is incorporated.
  4. Transfer the mousse into serving dishes and place in the fridge until you want to serve. You can also eat it right away if you like.

Dawn - Breast Cancer Authority BlogAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Plant-Based Diets and Cellular Stress Defenses

Plant Based Diet Fpr Protection Against CancerBy: Micheal Greger, MD, Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

The traditional model of how fruits and vegetables protect against cancer is that their antioxidants prevent the buildup of free radicals (also known as reactive oxygen species) which would otherwise go on to damage our cellular DNA, membranes, etc, which can lead to the transformation of healthy cells into damaged, diseased, or dying cells. But in that landmark 2003 kiwifruit study, we learned that there’s a second pathway as well. Phytonutrients actually modulate gene expression and can increase our cellular defenses such that even if there is some damage to our DNA our cells may recover instead of being irreparably lost.

The kiwi study look at one of those defenses, one DNA repair enzyme, but there are many. Many ways our cells repair our DNA—we don’t mess around when it comes to protecting our genes. So question number 1, what affect does kiwifruit consumption have on all these other defences, and question number 2, what if we branch out and test multiple fruits and vegetables at the same time?

You’ll remember that there did not seem to be a dose response with the kiwis. As far as this DNA repair enzyme was concerned, you were either eating kiwis or not, it didn’t really matter how many. But man cannot live on kiwis alone. What if you did a mix of fruits and veggies? Could you break through that ceiling?

Now studies are expensive, particularly if the kiwi people withhold funding because you have the audacity to test other fruit. So they wanted to make this study count. So when they designed their plant portfolio they went all out. Check it out. Green tea. Rosehip juice, Berries, berries, berries, berries, berries, berries, berries, berries, pomegranate, dark blue grapes, brussel sproinds, broccoli, red cabbage, kale, blue potatoes, dark chocolate walnuts rosemary oregano. This study, is making me hungry.

I don’t know if anyone noticed but this is that same amazing research group that blessed the world with that study of thousands of different foods. So they knew what they were doing.

OK long story short: “Plant-based diets can prevent development of several chronic age-related diseases,” blah blah blah we know that. This is what they did: three groups, the antioxidants-to-the-teeth group, compared to a 3 kiwi a day group, compared to control. Tool blood from everyone, and for then for the first time ever reported did this microarray analysis where you can measure the effects of a plant-based diet on expression of hundreds of different genes at a time. The first to investigate the influences of healthy diets on gene expression in whole blood.

The kiwi group was able to significant regulate not just one gene as I showed in the 2003 study but a total of 5. Meanwhile the very berry group significantly regulated 5 times more, 25 genes. Conclusion: The observed changes in the blood cell gene expression profiles suggest that the beneficial effects of a plant-based diet on human health may be mediated through optimization of defence processes.

Doctor’s Note

This is the final video of a three-part series about the latest discoveries on kiwi fruit. See also yesterday’s NutritionFacts.org video-of-the-day Kiwifruit and DNA Repair and Kiwifruit for Irritable Bowel Syndrome. The results of this follow-up study support the previous work on the importance of dietary diversity that I profiled in Apples and Oranges and Garden Variety Anti-Inflammation. The study of thousands of foods I mention is referring to Antioxidant Content of 3,139 Foods, and Antioxidant Power of Plant Foods Versus Animal Foods. Note this study is measuring so-called “epigenetic” changes, meaning differential gene expression. Just because we have a certain set of genes doesn’t mean you can’t turn them on and off with changes in your diet. See Mitochondrial Theory of Aging and Convergence of Evidence and the other thousand plus nutrition and health topics I address.

For some context, please check out my associated blog posts: Kiwi Fruit for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and How Tumors Use Meat to Grow

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.:

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Boosting Anti-Cancer Immunity With Berries

Boosting Anti-Cancer Immunity With BberriesBy: Dr. Greger, Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

For disease prevention and health maintenance, berries of all colors have “emerged as champions.” Research has focused mainly on cancer prevention and treatment. Studies show that the anticancer effects of berries are partially mediated through their abilities to counteract, reduce, and also repair damage resulting from oxidative stress and inflammation. Berries may also have many other positive effects, such as boosting detoxifying enzymes.

One of the more remarkable effects is that of blueberries on natural killer cell counts. Natural killer cells are part of our immune system’s rapid response team against cancer cells, eliminating cancer cells through the activation of cancer cell suicide via death receptors. They’re called natural killers because they don’t require activation by prior exposure. We don’t want to wait until our second tumor before our immune system starts fighting.

We have about two billion of these soldiers circulating in our blood stream at any one time, but we may be able to get a troop surge with blueberries. Researchers had athletes eat about a cup and a half of blueberries a day for six weeks to see if that would reduce the oxidative stress of long-distance running. They indeed saw a blunting of the spike in oxidant stress. But that’s not what sets that study apart.

The number of natural killer cells in the blood typically decreases after prolonged endurance exercise, dropping by half to only about one billion—that is, unless we’ve been eating lots of blueberries. In the video, Boosting Natural Killer Cell Activity,  you can see a graph comparing natural killer cell numbers with and without blueberries.  Those who ate blueberries retained close to the standard two billion cells. This is because six weeks of blueberries had doubled the resting number of natural killer cells up to over four billion. This has never before been demonstrated in humans. There was a study on goji berries, but despite a cup a day for a month, there was no significant change in the number of natural killers.

Another study, though, showed a significant increase in natural killer cell activity thanks to the spice cardamom. (Cardamom and blueberries—I never thought we’d be fighting cancer with blueberry muffins!) When researchers took some lymphoma cells in a petri dish and added cardamom, nothing happened. However, if we add some natural killer cells, about 5% of the cancer cells are wiped out. Add a little more cardamom, and our troops do better still. And then if we add more and more spice, then all of a sudden the natural killer cells are killing cancer like crazy—the same number of natural killer cells, but they’re now able to kill off ten times more cancer cells. While cardamom alone had no effect on cancer cells even at the highest dose, it seemed to enhance our natural killer cells’ killer instincts.

The same thing was found for black pepper: Black pepper alone, nothing, but when combined with natural killer cells, there seemed to be a boosting effect up to around 30 or 40% cancer cell clearance. If cardamom and black pepper are combined, they synergize and their individual effects are doubled. The researchers conclude that “Taken together, these data strongly suggest that black pepper and cardamom have the potential to markedly enhance the anti-cancer activity of natural killer cells.”

Exercise itself can improve immune function in general (See Preserving Immune Function in Athletes With Nutritional Yeast), but the blueberry finding, so far, is unique. The oxidative stress part of the story is told in Reducing Muscle Soreness With Berries.

It is true that the blueberry study was funded by the North American Blueberry Council and the North Carolina High-bush Blueberry Council. However, just because the study was funded by blueberry councils doesn’t necessarily mean the science is suspect, but we would want to see the study independently verified, especially one so dramatic.

What else can berries do? Check out:

You can check also out my blueberry smoothie recipe here in A Better Breakfast.

Michael Greger M.D.About Michael Greger M.D.
Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live year-in-review presentations Uprooting the Leading Causes of Death, More Than an Apple a Day, and From Table to Able.

Image Credit:  Stein Lauritsen / Flickr

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