Why Cancer Patients Use Yoga To Cope With Diagnosis & Treatment

Yoga Counteracts Anxiety And Stress During Cancer Treatment

It is well documented that yoga decreases stress hormones, like cortisol and increases GABA (gamma-Aminonbutyric acid) levels. GABA is an important calming chemical produced by the brain that counteracts anxiety and stress. GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter chemical in the brain. GABA is responsible for balancing mood levels.

Restorative Yoga Practice Increases Cancer Patients Physical Stamina

It is believed that certain physical reaction disorders are due to the failure to produce adequate levels of GABA. Through brain imaging it has been shown that a restorative yoga practice increases GABA levels markedly. When GABA levels are maintained with breast cancer patients, physical stamina increases. Daily activities like climbing stairs, walking and doing the laundry become easier compared with those that don’t engage in a yoga practice or exercise.

Patients Who Practice Yoga Appear to Cope Better

Depression is also important to address with (breast) cancer patients. The uncertainty about prognosis and treatment, concerns of pain or even death, lack of physical and functional abilities and social changes contribute to depression. Patients who practice yoga appear to cope better with symptoms of illness, and the side effects and distresses of treatments. It is sited that the physical poses, breathing exercises, meditation techniques are especially helpful components of a yoga practice.

The proper balancing of the physical, and then emotional body are key to recovery, and good health. We need both but they need to be in balance, and yoga works directly at balancing them.

Best Yoga Poses To Encourage And Energize Cancer Patients
Suggested Cancer Self-Help Healing Books:

Dawn BradfordAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Cancer, Gratitude Practice & Yoga: Easy Ways To Significantly Improve Your Life

Developing gratitude is a practice and a skill which yoga supports. One way to engage in a gentle practice of gratitude is through the use of mudra. Mudras are hand positions and often called ‘yoga for the hands’. They are gestures which ‘seal’ our intentions or desires by focusing breath and energy into our mudras.

Lotus Mudra is one way to contemplate our gratitude. By joining our hands at the heart-space, we keep the base of the palms joined and touch pinky and thumbs together;  while spreading open our fingers like a lotus flower. The lotus flower is nourished by mud and fed by sunshine.

For cancer survivors, and I am one, this lovely gesture has even deeper and richer meaning. From the murky depth of cancer, there continues to be rays of life and hope. Can we hold both truths in our mind’s eye?

I find that a simple bouquet of flowers goes a long way to nudging my mind toward gratitude.  As we hold the Lotus Mudra, we can fill the container of our hearts by naming our blessings. Practicing gratitude takes less than 3 seconds and this small change can bring big rewards to our immune system.

Cultivating an “attitude of gratitude” depends on feeding the soul. We acknowledge the mud we all swim in, and see that difficult circumstances may bring opportunities, as well. I was talking with a newly diagnosed cancer patient just yesterday. He has been stubbornly independent his whole life. And he told me he was proud of himself for being independent. I told him that cancer diagnosis and treatment was a time to open up receiving help. We don’t “do cancer alone”!

Research tells us that those who have a :

  • Social network, far better during cancer treatment
  • Yoga can help fatigue and sleep
  • More fruits and veggies in our diets is better fuel for our bodies
  • Spiritual practices can be supportive of our immune system
  • Developing coping skills can ease anxiety

Yoga practices are more than postures for the body or asanas. A whole person is mind, body, emotions and spirit. We simply unite these aspects of the human experience with breathing consciously. As we progress, we consciously awaken to our everyday lives and see anew. We needn’t travel to India, yoga’s homeland, or even leave our beds to give gratitude aloud. I am not advocating ignoring the pain that cancer and its treatments bring. I am saying that these muddy waters are rich soul-food which demands we rise above the darkness. That in the midst of hardship, we do not overlook the tenacity of a weed to grow out of cement.

And though I don’t know you, when I give thanks during the Lotus Mudra, I will call your soul by name and include you in my gratitude. We journey together.

About Jean Di Carlo Wagner: Owner of Yogabeing.net
E-RYT200, E-RYT500 certified with Yoga Alliance
Yoga Therapist with International Alliance of Yoga Therapists
Atma Yoga Teacher Training, certified 500 hours Los Angeles
A Gentle Way Yoga, certified 200 hours
Silver Age Yoga, certified 200 hours

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Suggested Cancer Self-Help Healing Books:

 

Inspirational Book For Cancer Patients

Breast Cancer Authority Blog brings you exciting news. A new cancer patient self help book, the ABC Workbook for Cancer Patients: Healing One Letter at a Time, was just released on Amazon.com.  You can get your copy today.  This book is written by a breast cancer survivor times two to help cancer patients have something positive to think about during treatment or while they are in the waiting game.  As cancer patients know, there are long periods of weeks, to wait for results of testing, appointments to see other specialist, and time after radiation and chemotherapy for the three-month PET scan to see if the treatment has been helpful. Waiting to hear is one of the hardest parts of treatment. Speaking of waiting to hear, brings me to another important piece of this cancer journey.  Do you feel heard?

Let’s admit it, cancer treatment is big business.  But I do believe that most if not all oncologist, radiologists, and medical cancer professionals go into this career for the same reason I became a psychologist, to help people.  In the helping people industry, there is a lot of overwhelm, busy schedules and an overload of work to be done, from reading lab results, to consulting with team members and ordering more tests to actually seeing the patient.  It is overwhelming and if you are the 3 o’clock patient that is seeing your doctor (who has yet to grab a bite to eat and has been running on caffeine all-day) you may very well be in that slot that is invisible.  Meaning that, by that time in the day,the doctor is on auto-pilot and your story is blending with the 18 others he/she has already heard throughout the day.  Thus, when you ask your important question, “Will this treatment cause my hair to fall out?”  You may very well hear; most chemotherapy patients lose their hair.  I suggest you buy a wig, if that is bothersome to you.”  Well, that really wasn’t the answer you were looking for.  You were hoping for something more empathic like, “Yes, being concerned about losing your hair is a really important question and I imagine the answer is not one that is going to help you feel comfortable.  Yes, you probably will lose your hair by at least the third treatment.  There are several options that you have for this unpleasant side-effect of treatment.”

Now, this is where it gets a bit tricky depending on how large of a treatment center you are attending.  Many clinics today have a cancer care co-ordinater.  That person is assigned to you to walk along beside of you and answer important questions like, “Will my hair fall out?” Other facilities are understaffed and over-worked (I think they are all over-worked regardless of how many staff they have) and regardless of how hard the staff try, it is difficult for them to attend to your many questions.  Thus, that is why is it is so important that you develop an attitude that you are the captain of your treatment team.  You do the research on line, find support groups, and find key players as your cancer resource team.  From there you get what you need because you pursue the information.  In my book the T letter of the alphabet is TALK.  Ask for What You Need.  That short helpful chapter acts as a reminder and a permission giver for you to use your words to ask for what you need.  You may not always get an affirmative answer, but I promise you will never get an answer if you don’t ask.

I have three cancer related books on the market, In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer, which is a story about what it was like to get the diagnosis and go through treatment in 1999.  Then last year, I published Breast Cancer A-Z Mindful Practices.  It is a great assistant to someone recently diagnosed and in treatment for breast cancer, similar tomy newest book, ABC Workbook for Cancer Patients.  Each book keeps getting better and each one has something to offer to the reader.  I encourage you to check out each book on Amazon.com today.

Suggested Cancer Self-Help Healing Book:

Dr. Robin DilleyDr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer is a licensed psychologist in the State of Arizona. Her eclectic practice allows her to cross diagnostic barriers and meet clients in their need assisting them to respond to life in healthy and empowering ways rather than react to life’s circumstances.

 

Three Minute Exercise To Boost Your Breast Cancer Healing Process

In our Western Culture, we often use our bodies as if they are machines, neglected machines at that. Our bodies deserve our focus and attention and it can be as simple as stopping our endless activity and taking three minutes to check in. The three-minute check is a simple mindful body scan to acknowledge what your body wants and does not want.

You are on this website or this blog because you have an interest in the body-mind connection. You have found that it is important to incorporate your body into your healing process. Some of us resonant with Yoga, others of us do not. No problem. Here is a simple exercise that I created for you to check in with your body and this exercise will help you get to your YES, in the previous blog.

How to do a Body Scan Meditation
Learning to scan your body for information is a way of practicing mindfulness. Here are some easy steps.

  1. Turn your attention to your body. You don’t need any fancy way of sitting, a meditative place to go, or any special equipment. Take a breath and turn your attention toward your body.
  2. Notice what position it is in. How are you currently sitting? What aches? What is uncomfortable? Take a moment to practice slow breathing. Breathe all the way in and exhale as if you are blowing out a candle. Crunch your body up tightly and gently let it go. Breathe, crunch, and breathe again.
  3. Bring your goal, wish, or your want to the foreground of your mind’s eye. Allow yourself to sit with it for a few moments. Even allowing yourself to say your goal gently out loud, or to yourself. Allow yourself to imagine that goal being accomplished. See the finished accomplishment. Notice what you feel. How does your body respond to that finished accomplishment?
  4. What is happening to your tension, neck, back, shoulders, stomach? Just notice it. Breathe again, deeply in and gently blow out the candle.
  5. Notice any negativity, resistance, restraint, and observe. Breathe into it and exhale slowly.
  6. Notice again your body. Is there a YES? If not, what is there? Sadness, fear, anger. Accept it, smile at it. “Ah yes, there you are. You have been trying to get my attention and I have been running and avoiding you. What do you need me to know?” If you have your YES, make it bigger in size and then smaller in size.
  7. Just observe what happens to your body when you stop long enough to listen.
  8. As you listen, allow yourself to experience. Stay close to yourself. Use your breath to regulate your emotion. Move toward the emotion, not away from it. Give yourself a bit of time to just be here now.
  9. Bring your awareness back to your body. Notice what it is feeling and where. Use your breath to gently raise and lower your abdomen. Let yourself smile and say thank-you.
  10. Gently allow yourself to come back to the here and now.

Do this exercise as often as you can. By experimenting with this exercise often through-out the day you learn information about yourself that you do not normally take time to pay attention to. This important information will guide you to better and more positive choices for yourself and even for those around you.

If you body cringes every time it is around a certain person, what is it that your body wants you to know?

If your body feels upbeat and energetic around other people, notice. You get to choose who, how often and under what circumstances people are in your daily life.

Your body can become your best radar as to who is good for you or whom you need to place a protective ring around yourself when you have to be around them. Your imaginary ring of protection will help you not to absorb their energy or allow you to be brought down by their negativity. The imaginary ring protects.

New Book For Cancer Patients By Dr. Dilley

 

 

Suggested Cancer Self-Help Healing Book:

Dr. Robin DilleyDr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer is a licensed psychologist in the State of Arizona. Her eclectic practice allows her to cross diagnostic barriers and meet clients in their need assisting them to respond to life in healthy and empowering ways rather than react to life’s circumstances.

Journey to Hope: Leaving the Fear of Breast Cancer Behind

Journey to Hope: Leaving the Fear of Breast Cancer Behind
now available on Kindle!
Click HERE to download.

 Women fear breast cancer more than any other disease. This is true even though a woman in the United States is ten times more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than she is breast cancer. Much of the reason for this fear is that women are told there’s nothing that can be done to prevent breast cancer. They’re told only to get a yearly mammogram hoping to find it at an earlier, more treatable stage. And now, even that’s controversial.

Western medicine is so focused on family history as the overriding risk factor for breast cancer that not much else is ever discussed. But only 25% of all cases of breast cancer occur in women with a family history. What about the other 75%? How can conventional medicine be so dogmatic that breast cancer can’t be prevented when no one knows what’s causing three-quarters of the cases?

Trying to obtain information about breast cancer risk can be as confusing as it is overwhelming. So many questions. So few concrete answers. So much information. So much of it contradictory. Does it matter what I eat? Should I take vitamins? What about stress? Are emotional and psychological factors important? What about toxins in the environment?

The traditional medical view is that none of this matters. But there is much evidence to the contrary. There are simple, reasonable steps you can take that will significantly decrease your risk of developing breast cancer and decrease your risk of dying of it if you have already been diagnosed.

The key to good health and cancer prevention lies more in your own hands than you might think. What you eat, how you feel, what you think, and even what you believe affects your breast cancer risk. The focus of this website as well as my book, Journey to Hope, is self-care, which means learning to do for yourself what the medical system cannot do for you.

My goal is to dispel the current medical dogma that there’s nothing you can do to prevent this disease. The good news is—there’s a lot you can do. The bad news is—your doctor can’t do it for you. You have to do it for yourself.

Dr. Hudson developed a special interest in health and wellness several years ago, especially as it relates to cancer and cancer prevention. His passion is to spread the message of self-care and prevention to women concerned about their risk of breast cancer. He counsels women one-on-one on matters of overall health and wellness, including how the mind-body connection impacts their cancer journey.
Consultation Services
Dr. Hudson is available by appointment for telephone or Skype consultations. Because of his broad experience in breast imaging and breast cancer diagnosis, he can be helpful in a number of ways:

Labyrinth Walking: A Healing Tool For Cancer Patients


Tool For Cancer PatientsLabyrinth
Walking can be a healing tool for cancer patients. In many ways the labyrinth represents the journey to healing. Healing is not only physical but also occurs on the emotional, mental, and spiritual levels. A physical healing is often described as a cure. While a cure might not be possible, healing is always an option. To be healed means to be made whole, and wholeness is fundamentally a psychological and spiritual process of finding meaning. The labyrinth can be used as a tool of healing to help people find meaning in their situation.  You can find more healing tools in the book ABC Workbook for Cancer Patients.

A portable canvas labyrinth can be used and cancer patients are encouraged to walk it as a symbolic journey to recovery and healing. It is suggested that you think about your life from diagnosis through treatment up until the present moment and to relate your journey to the labyrinth walk.

Suggested questions

  1. What is the most important lesson your illness and recovery has taught you?
  2. How has your illness had a positive effect on your life?
  3. How has it affected your relationships?
  4. In what ways are you more whole than before you illness?
  5. What about your illness are you grateful for?
  6. How has your spirit been influenced?
  7. What is required for continued healing?

The path towards healing is not straight and often you feel lost. Perseverance is required to complete the journey. The center represents treatment and the journey out is toward recovery and acceptance. People come and go on the journey. The whole process occurs in the container and context of love and spirit. You feel more connected and relaxed

.Suggested Cancer Self-Help Healing Book:

Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness

In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer 

ABC Workbook for Cancer Patients.

Breast Cancer: A-Z Mindful Practices: Self Care Tools For Treatment & Recovery

5 Ways Yoga Benefits Cancer Post-Treatment Fatigue

Yoga For Cancer Related FatigueIf you’re a cancer survivor and feeling tired or even worse, even long after treatment, you are not alone. About one-third of breast cancer survivors experience this debilitating condition for anywhere from a year to several years post-treatment.

Cancer-related fatigue, (CRF)is very common in breast cancer patients.  Fatigue can often be confused with tiredness. Tiredness happens to everyone. One would expect to be tired  after certain activities, treatments or from daily activities. Sleep and resting is most important when recovering. Fatigue can prevent you from functioning normally and impacts your quality of life.

However, fatigue is an unusual or excessive whole-body tiredness is not relieved with sleep. It can be acute (lasting a month or less) or chronic (lasting from one month to six months or longer).

How To Cope With Cancer-Related Fatigue
The precise reason is unknown, but it may be related to the process of the disease itself or through the chemotherapies and radiation treatments. (CRF) is one of the most common side effects of cancer and its associated treatments. Usually, it comes on suddenly, does not result from activity or exertion, and is not relieved by rest or sleep. It is often described as “paralyzing.” It may continue even after treatment is complete.

What Cancer Patients Can Expect From A Yoga Practice :

  1. women with post-treatment fatigue were still feeling more invigorated than before they started
  2. women become more energized
  3. women see improvement in mood and sleep
  4. women are typically more relaxed, and more aware
  5. women are more accepting of what life brings to them

To Assist Patients As They Cope With CancerUnfortunately there’s no conventional therapy to resolve it, but studies are increasingly showing yoga designed specifically for breast cancer survivors is helping women to catch a second wind. In fact, a recent UCLA study found that three months after beginning yoga, women with post-treatment fatigue were still feeling more invigorated than before they started. Not only do women become more energized, but they see improvement in mood and sleep; they are typically more relaxed, more aware, and more accepting of what life brings to them. All these attributes are so critical as we work toward our continued mental and physical well-being, and ultimately, our healing.  We suggest ABC Workbook For Cancer Patients for additional post-treatment tools. 

 

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us atinfo@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

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14 Helpful Ideas To Cope With Cancer During The Holidays

Treatment is coming along but it is my first Holiday Season living with the knowledge that there is this aggressive invader in my body. What am I to do? Sound familiar? Identify?

Living with a cancer diagnosis is not for the faint of heart. And the Holiday season only amplifies the reality that you have come face-to-face with your own mortality. This diagnosis like none other slaps you into the reality that life is not forever for anyone, especially your life, as you are actively fighting for it. I found it helpful during my treatment to keep my life as “normal” as possible. So here are a few to-dos that might be helpful.

  1. Do decorate but do not go overboard. Your energy is needed to heal.
  2. Do buy your favorite foods even if they don’t taste quite the same.
  3. If you are one of those who loves to cook or bake then choose a favorite and make it.
  4. If you send out a Christmas letter then focus on the positives of the treatment process and use the letter to tell them what you need to hear from them this coming year. The reality is no one knows what to say and often say nothing in order to not say the wrong thing. So include a little paragraph that says something like this:
      “I know the C word makes everyone nervous and afraid. Thank goodness Cancer is not contagious and you can’t transmit it by talking about it. Do not be afraid to ask me, “How are you doing?” Don’t be afraid to ask me, “Do you want to talk about it?” Or “What do you need?” I have good days and bad days and often times I don’t know what I need but it feels good to be asked. And what I need to hear from you most is: “I don’t know what to say or ask, but I am wanting you to know you are important to me, what can I do?”
  5. If you love shopping, go off times when everyone else is at work.
  6. Listen to great Christmas music and if you get bored or teary with it, then switch to music you really love. Don’t be afraid of your tears. Tell your journal how you are feeling and what you are experiencing.
  7. Watch holiday movies. Go to a play or live performance.
  8. Get outside. Bundle up and walk around the block or drive to a park. A change of scenery always feels good.
  9. If you are too weak to drive have someone take you to see Christmas lights.
  10. Buy an adult coloring book to color in as the days turn into weeks and weeks into months. Coloring can be a useful and fun activity that keeps your mind from worrying so much.
  11. Drink tea. It is a wonderful healing ritual.
  12. Wear your favorite and most comfortable clothes.
  13. And if you are traveling for the holiday on trains or airplanes consider wearing a mask in addition to keeping hands clean to help protect from others’ germs. These are not full-proof measures but the extra steps to help.
  14. And, best of all, give yourself permission to NOT do anything you don’t want to do. If you hate wrapping presents, switch to gift bags only. If you hate cooking, order your holiday meal. Pamper yourself.

Create new memories for next year. Having cancer is a real bummer but do not let it control you and your mood. You are still alive right now and use this time to make the most of it with your loved ones. None of us are immortal. We will all die. We do not get a choice about that. But we do get a choice about how we live and what we create while we are here. Never allow self-pity to steal your joy. Find something to enjoy every day. Give back. Call a friend who is down and cheer him/her up. Look for ways to make a positive difference in the lives of people around you. You may have cancer but that does not mean your entire identity has changed. Don’t let cancer own you. Live your life the best possible way and get determined to enjoy this Holiday Season regardless. Turn up that music now!

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Dr. Robin B. Dilley’s Books:

Dr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer is a licensed psychologist in the State of Arizona. Her eclectic practice allows her to cross diagnostic barriers and meet clients in their need assisting them to respond to life in healthy and empowering ways rather than react to life’s circumstances.

New Self-Help Book For A Positive Future

“Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness” offers a map from one’s past to successful, fulfilled present!

Robin B. Dilley, PhD releases ‘Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness’ that explores one’s past to understand their actions and launch their way to a positive and fulfilled future with her new self-help book. “Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness” (published by Balboa Press) expounds on the power of journal writing in addressing issues and inspires readers to tell their own success story.

Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness” provides reflective questions and writing pages that help readers dig deeper into the themes in their life. It is a book for the curious; with a hands-on approach designed to take the reader into the heart of their childhood and lead them on the path out to a healthier lifestyle in the present.

“Everyone has a family with good and bad traits. Identifying those messages is the first key to integrating and resolving present day bad habits that you have been wanting to ditch for years,” Dilley points out. “I want readers to experience their own resilience and celebrate their strengths moving forward with hope and courage.”

Engaging and thought-provoking, this book discovers “more of who you are and freeing you to become who you want to be,” highlighting how change becomes essential to growth. “Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness” is a map from the past to the present.

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About the Author
Robin B. Dilley, PhD, the author of “In a Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer” and is currently working on “Breast Cancer: Emotional Support A-Z,” is a licensed clinical psychologist with 35 years’ experience. She studied and practiced psychotherapy for many years earning a master’s degree in marriage and family therapy and proceeded to earn her doctoral degree from Union Institute in 1992. During her journey with breast cancer, she fell in love with the spiritual practice of walking the labyrinth and became an advanced Veriditas Labyrinth facilitator as recently as 2015. She also practices the importance of meditation to improve health, reduce stress and usher in happiness. In her free time, Dilley’s passion to write, whether it be as a professional blogger or author, has opened avenues for her to reach others searching for personal empowerment, healing and growth.

Cancer Patients: The Effects of Light and Dark on Physiology

Changes in our physiology during light and dark | Is artificial light disrupting our rhythm?Let’s look today at what effects changes in light and dark cycle (our circadian rhythm) have on our body. Is messing with this natural cycle affecting our health?
Our physiology is organized to change with time. The daily changes that happen are very important for our health and wellness. For example, we need rest and sleep in order to heal and restore.

Light and absence of light, detected by the eye, is the major cue used by the body to discriminate day from night and to create our circadian rhythm. If this rhythm is disrupted, many parts of our physiology can be affected.

Take a look at the infographic below which shows some of the physiological factors that vary from the light of day to the dark of night.

From the above, we can see that many different systems in our bodies have a rhythm. This temporal organization of our physiology is critical for our health.
Disruption of our circadian rhythm has been linked to many disease processes, including metabolic syndrome, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disease, intestinal dysbiosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cancer.

In the past, we had predictable periods of daily light and dark, driven by the sun rising and setting. These set our circadian rhythms. When it was daylight, the physiology on the left-hand side of the infographic applied and when it was dark, that on the right-hand side applied.

The electric light bulb
But then the electric light bulb was invented.  This has significantly impacted our light and dark cycle, drastically reducing the dark part.  The part when our body is healing.
Our boundaries of light and dark are now blurred. The sun goes down and we turn on the lights. Instead of natural light-dark cycles, we now use lights to illuminate us for 4 or more extra hours. Our biological processes are consequently not as synchronized as they used to be. This means hormones, gene expression, immune function, mood, metabolism, our gut microbiota may all be affected.

Light:dark time importance
Light and dark are the key. It’s not just asleep and awake. It is those triggers that shift us from one stage to the other and having a rhythm that the body can be entrained towards.  Our nighttime physiology is our dark physiology not just sleep physiology. The dark transitions us. Things begin to change as the light disappears.

Time to go back to the light of fires and candles? 
Obviously, we don’t want to give up the convenience of our electric lights and stop using light emitting electronic devices like televisions, computers, iPhones etc at night. None of this huddling around the fire or candles to read our paper. But if this light is affecting our health is there something we can do? I’ll explore some options next week.
In the meantime, pay attention to how many hours you use lights in the house after it is dark outside. How bright are your lights at home? How close to bedtime do you watch TV or use computer/phone screens? If you get up in the night to go to the bathroom, do you switch the light on?
If you want to make sure you receive next week’s blog post, please sign up for it to be delivered to your email box. I don’t send anything else. Just 2 blog posts a week. The sign-up box is on the top right-hand side of this page. Just enter your email address.

Sleep tight.

 Ruth Baillie is originally from the UK and now lives most of the year in Northern California. She holds two Master’s degrees, one in Personalized Nutrition (distinction), and another in Health Psychology. She is a Registered Nutritional Therapist, Certified Professional Cancer Coach, and Cancer Guide, and has undertaken considerable post-graduate studies in integrative naturopathic oncology. She is the author of “Choices in mind-body medicine for cancer patients in Sonoma County, California” and her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals.

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Photo source: Imgur.com

 

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