Protein Rich Breakfast Cookies For A Cancer Diet

Typically cookies or other types of sweets are not recommended for a cancer diet. Healing cancer and eating sugar just don’t go together! The good news is you can still have sweets without the harmful effects of traditional, processed ingredients. Try out this healthy cookie recipe with alternative ingredients and extra protein. These cookies are wonderful for breakfast with coconut milk yogurt.  Always use organic ingredients when possible.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup(6tbsp.) butter or vegan butter alternative (Earth Balance)
  • 3/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar or date sugar
  • 1/2 granulated sugar or coconut sugar
  • 2 eggs or Vegan Eggs/flaxseed alternative
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla
  • 1 1/2 cup all purpose-flour or peanut flour (rich in protein)
  • 2 tablespoons almond milk if using peanut flour to keep from being too dry
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon pink Himalayan salt (optional)
  • 3 cups quick oats
  • 1 cup raisins

Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees F. In a large bowl, beat butter and alternative sugars on medium speed of electric mixer until creamy.
  2. Add alternative eggs and vanilla; beat well.
  3. Add combined flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt, mix well.
  4. Add oats and raisins and mix well.
  5. Bake 8 -10 minutes or until golden brown. Cool 1 minute on cookie sheet; remove to wire rack. Cool completely. Store tightly covered. Makes 2 dozen

OPTION:

  • Bar Cookies – Bake 30 minutes in ungreased 13 x 9 metal baking pan.
  • CannButter – Replace butter alternative with Cannabutter (can be made with butter alternative).

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Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us atinfo@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

 

Breast Cancer Yoga Therapy for Stretching the Area of the Incision

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Gentle or restorative yoga poses can be very healing if done with care and awareness.Once you receive clearance from your doctor to begin exercise try a gentle restorative yoga practice.

A gentle or restorative yoga practice may be very healing in stretching the area of the incision, the calming down of the stress attached to the surgery as well as bringing the ROM, (range of motion) back to the entire area of the chest.

Fish pose opens up the heart and since the heart is connected to your lymphatic system, which is your central immune system, these glands are stimulated in this yoga posture. In Fish pose, you are opening your rib cage, lungs and upper back, therefore opening yourself to more love.Fish Pose For Breast Cancer
This pose benefits the student with a sense of deep relaxation, inner calm,and of being grounded. More benefits include:

Benefits

  • Quiets the mind quickly
  • Promotes lymphatic drainage of breasts and pectoral muscles
  • Post surgical benefits of reducing fibrous adhesions and scar tissue
  • Allows the shoulder blades to feel supported comfortably
  • Spreads the clavicle, relieves pressure on brachial plexus (network of nerves)
  • Stretches and expands the pectoral muscles
  • A large heart opener that frees the breath
  • Stretches the deep hip flexors (psoas) and the muscles (intercostals) between the ribs
  • Stimulates and stretches the belly muscles and front of the neck
  • Strengthens the muscles of the upper back and back of the neck
  • Tones the front of your neck and your abdominals
  • Relieves tension in your neck, throat, and shoulders
  • Improves posture – has therapeutic effect on rounded-shoulders, asthma, spasms in the bronchial tubes, and other respiratory issues

fish-pose-for-lymphedemaInstructions

  1. Use a generous amount of props to support this wonderful pose.
  2. Start with a folded blanket under your hips, and blocks (side-by-side) or bolster under your upper spine, and another pillow, bolster or folded blanket for your shoulders. The goal is to feel your heart open and your chest lifted.
  3. Keep your legs close together and don’t let your feet flop out.
  4. Remain conscious of the pose, and especially of your breath.
  5. Play around with supporting props. Make sure each prop feels perfect.
  6. If you want to fully express the pose; bring both arms overhead and extend in both directions.
  7. This is a pose that can be sustained for 5/10 minutes.
  8. When releasing out of the pose, point the toes mightily and come up with a lifted chest (if possible).
  9. Once up flex your feet and hang forward to release the backbend effects.
Breast Cancer Yoga Fish PoseTo experience the benefits of yoga for breast cancer, it is essential that you begin with simple, gentle yoga movements. You should also consult a doctor before you begin practicing yoga. It is also necessary that you follow a yogic diet that consists of a mainly vegetarian diet to enhance the benefits of yoga.

Try Breast Cancer Yoga’s extra gentle yoga DVD for breast cancer recovery and lymphedema management.

Dawn Breast CancerAbout Dawn Bradford Lange:  Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us atinfo@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

Animal Protein May Play a Role in Cancer Risk

In the two decades between 1990 and 2010, the leading causes of death and disability remained relatively constant. Heart disease remains the leading cause of loss of health and life, but among the diseases whose incidence has increased the most over the past generation is chronic kidney disease. The number of deaths has doubled.

Our “meat-sweet” diet has been implicated in this escalation. Excess table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup consumption is associated with increased blood pressure and uric acid levels, both of which can damage the kidney. The saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol found in animal products and junk food are also associated with impaired kidney function, and meat protein increases the acid load to the kidneys, boosting ammonia production and potentially damaging our sensitive kidney tissue. This is why a restriction of protein intake is often recommended to chronic kidney disease patients to help prevent further functional decline.

Is all protein created equal? No—not all protein has the same effect on your kidneys. Our kidneys appear to handle plant protein very differently from animal protein. Within hours of consuming meat, our kidneys rev up into hyperfiltration mode, dramatically increasing the kidneys’ workload. This is true of a variety of animal proteins—beef, chicken, and fish appear to have similar effects. But an equivalent amount of plant protein causes virtually no noticeable stress on the kidneys. Eat some tuna, and within three hours, your kidney filtration rate can shoot up 36 percent. But eating the same amount of protein in the form of tofu doesn’t appear to place any additional strain on the kidneys.

Why does animal protein cause the overload reaction while plant protein doesn’t? Researchers discovered that after giving subjects a powerful anti-inflammatory drug along with animal protein, the hyperfiltration response disappeared, suggesting the hyperactive response was triggered by inflammation.

Animal protein may also play a role in cancer risk. IGF-1, insulin-like growth factor 1, is a cancer-promoting growth hormone that is released in excess when we eat animal protein. This is presumably why those who eat less meat, egg white, or dairy proteins have significantly lower levels circulating within their bodies within weeks of making the dietary switch. This lowering of IGF-1 levels is thought to be why the blood of men and women eating plant-based diets suppresses prostate and breast cancer growth in vitro significantly better than those eating the Standard American Diet.

In health,
Michael Greger, M.D.

Dr. Michael Greger on Breast Cancer Authority Blog

Michael Greger, M.D., is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial. Currently Dr. Greger proudly serves as the Director of Public Health and Animal Agriculture at the Humane Society of the United States.

Easy Vegan Pea Soup

When you switch to a “cancer fighting diet” you do not have to make a lot of dietary changes, just add in some new veggies to substitute the meat.  Healthy eating is not that hard, it tastes better, and you family will learn healthy lifestyle choices too! Remember to always use organic ingredients when available.

Ingredients

2 – 3 tablespoons of olive oil or vegetable oil
4-5 carrots, sliced
3 celery stalks, minced
1 onion, minced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 potato, diced
3 tablespoons of nutritional yeast
2 tablespoons parsley
2 bay leaves
1 cup small pasta
3 cups of dried split peas
2 cartons or 6 cups of vegetable broth
2 cups of water

Directions

  1. Place carrots, celery, onion, and garlic in pan with olive oil. Heat for approximately 10 minutes or until tender. Place nutritional yeast, parsley and bay leaves in and let flavors meld together for 30 seconds. Remove, and place to the side.
  2. Then, place broth, water and split peas in pot. Bring to boil, then let simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent split peas from sticking to the bottom of the pot.
  3. Add cooked carrots, celery, onions, and garlic in pot as well as the potato. Partially cover and allow to simmer for 30 minutes.

A healthy diet is only one of several factors that can affect the immune system; exercise and stress management are just as important in improving your overall health and well-being.

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DawnBradford Co-Founder of Breast Cancer YogaAbout Dawn Bradford Lange: Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

 

 

Delicious & Healthy Mediterranean Roasted Chickpea Wrap

This simple and delicious Mediterranean inspired roasted chickpea wrap with refreshing tzatziki a cucumber vegan yogurt sauce comes from Susan at LiveLeanEat.com . We at Breast Cancer Yoga made this recipe and give it two thumbs up!

Ingredients
• 1 15 oz can chickpeas 425 g, 1 ½ cup soaked chickpeas if starting from dry, drained and rinsed
• 1 Tbsp olive oil 15 mL
• 1 Tbsp paprika* 7 g
• 1 tsp ground black pepper 3 g
• 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper 1.5 g
• 1/4 tsp salt 1.5 g
• 4 pita flatbread
• 1 cup tzatziki  (vegan plain yogurt & cucumber sauce)
• 1/4 red onion cut into strips
• 2 lettuce leaves roughly chopped
• 1 tomato sliced

Directions
1. Pat dry chickpeas with paper towel, removing any skins that may come off.
2. Gently toss chickpeas with oil, paprika, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and salt.
3. Spread chickpeas onto a greased rimmed baking sheet and roast at 400 degrees F (200 C) for about 20 minutes, until lightly browned but not hard.
4. Spread some tzatziki onto one side of the pita, then sprinkle in ¼ of the chickpeas and add veggies. Fold in half and enjoy!
Notes
• *If you don’t like spicy foods, half the amount paprika, black pepper, and cayenne pepper. Taste a chickpeas before baking and adjust flavors as needed.
• If your pita breads crack when you fold them, cover them with a moist paper towel and microwave for 20 to 30 seconds. Assemble your sandwich immediately after microwaveing.
• Wanna bring these to lunch? Try them in meal prep-able form!

A healthy diet is only one of several factors that can affect the immune system; exercise and stress management are just as important in improving your overall health and well-being.

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DawnBradford Co-Founder of Breast Cancer YogaAbout Dawn Bradford Lange: Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

14 Helpful Ideas To Cope With Cancer During The Holidays

Treatment is coming along but it is my first Holiday Season living with the knowledge that there is this aggressive invader in my body. What am I to do? Sound familiar? Identify?

Living with a cancer diagnosis is not for the faint of heart. And the Holiday season only amplifies the reality that you have come face-to-face with your own mortality. This diagnosis like none other slaps you into the reality that life is not forever for anyone, especially your life, as you are actively fighting for it. I found it helpful during my treatment to keep my life as “normal” as possible. So here are a few to-dos that might be helpful.

  1. Do decorate but do not go overboard. Your energy is needed to heal.
  2. Do buy your favorite foods even if they don’t taste quite the same.
  3. If you are one of those who loves to cook or bake then choose a favorite and make it.
  4. If you send out a Christmas letter then focus on the positives of the treatment process and use the letter to tell them what you need to hear from them this coming year. The reality is no one knows what to say and often say nothing in order to not say the wrong thing. So include a little paragraph that says something like this:
      “I know the C word makes everyone nervous and afraid. Thank goodness Cancer is not contagious and you can’t transmit it by talking about it. Do not be afraid to ask me, “How are you doing?” Don’t be afraid to ask me, “Do you want to talk about it?” Or “What do you need?” I have good days and bad days and often times I don’t know what I need but it feels good to be asked. And what I need to hear from you most is: “I don’t know what to say or ask, but I am wanting you to know you are important to me, what can I do?”
  5. If you love shopping, go off times when everyone else is at work.
  6. Listen to great Christmas music and if you get bored or teary with it, then switch to music you really love. Don’t be afraid of your tears. Tell your journal how you are feeling and what you are experiencing.
  7. Watch holiday movies. Go to a play or live performance.
  8. Get outside. Bundle up and walk around the block or drive to a park. A change of scenery always feels good.
  9. If you are too weak to drive have someone take you to see Christmas lights.
  10. Buy an adult coloring book to color in as the days turn into weeks and weeks into months. Coloring can be a useful and fun activity that keeps your mind from worrying so much.
  11. Drink tea. It is a wonderful healing ritual.
  12. Wear your favorite and most comfortable clothes.
  13. And if you are traveling for the holiday on trains or airplanes consider wearing a mask in addition to keeping hands clean to help protect from others’ germs. These are not full-proof measures but the extra steps to help.
  14. And, best of all, give yourself permission to NOT do anything you don’t want to do. If you hate wrapping presents, switch to gift bags only. If you hate cooking, order your holiday meal. Pamper yourself.

Create new memories for next year. Having cancer is a real bummer but do not let it control you and your mood. You are still alive right now and use this time to make the most of it with your loved ones. None of us are immortal. We will all die. We do not get a choice about that. But we do get a choice about how we live and what we create while we are here. Never allow self-pity to steal your joy. Find something to enjoy every day. Give back. Call a friend who is down and cheer him/her up. Look for ways to make a positive difference in the lives of people around you. You may have cancer but that does not mean your entire identity has changed. Don’t let cancer own you. Live your life the best possible way and get determined to enjoy this Holiday Season regardless. Turn up that music now!

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Dr. Robin B. Dilley’s Books:

Dr. Robin B. Dilley, author of In A Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer is a licensed psychologist in the State of Arizona. Her eclectic practice allows her to cross diagnostic barriers and meet clients in their need assisting them to respond to life in healthy and empowering ways rather than react to life’s circumstances.

New Self-Help Book For A Positive Future

“Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness” offers a map from one’s past to successful, fulfilled present!

Robin B. Dilley, PhD releases ‘Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness’ that explores one’s past to understand their actions and launch their way to a positive and fulfilled future with her new self-help book. “Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness” (published by Balboa Press) expounds on the power of journal writing in addressing issues and inspires readers to tell their own success story.

Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness” provides reflective questions and writing pages that help readers dig deeper into the themes in their life. It is a book for the curious; with a hands-on approach designed to take the reader into the heart of their childhood and lead them on the path out to a healthier lifestyle in the present.

“Everyone has a family with good and bad traits. Identifying those messages is the first key to integrating and resolving present day bad habits that you have been wanting to ditch for years,” Dilley points out. “I want readers to experience their own resilience and celebrate their strengths moving forward with hope and courage.”

Engaging and thought-provoking, this book discovers “more of who you are and freeing you to become who you want to be,” highlighting how change becomes essential to growth. “Writing Your Way to Healing and Wholeness” is a map from the past to the present.

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About the Author
Robin B. Dilley, PhD, the author of “In a Moment’s Notice: A Psychologist’s Journey with Breast Cancer” and is currently working on “Breast Cancer: Emotional Support A-Z,” is a licensed clinical psychologist with 35 years’ experience. She studied and practiced psychotherapy for many years earning a master’s degree in marriage and family therapy and proceeded to earn her doctoral degree from Union Institute in 1992. During her journey with breast cancer, she fell in love with the spiritual practice of walking the labyrinth and became an advanced Veriditas Labyrinth facilitator as recently as 2015. She also practices the importance of meditation to improve health, reduce stress and usher in happiness. In her free time, Dilley’s passion to write, whether it be as a professional blogger or author, has opened avenues for her to reach others searching for personal empowerment, healing and growth.

Cancer Patients: The Effects of Light and Dark on Physiology

Changes in our physiology during light and dark | Is artificial light disrupting our rhythm?Let’s look today at what effects changes in light and dark cycle (our circadian rhythm) have on our body. Is messing with this natural cycle affecting our health?
Our physiology is organized to change with time. The daily changes that happen are very important for our health and wellness. For example, we need rest and sleep in order to heal and restore.

Light and absence of light, detected by the eye, is the major cue used by the body to discriminate day from night and to create our circadian rhythm. If this rhythm is disrupted, many parts of our physiology can be affected.

Take a look at the infographic below which shows some of the physiological factors that vary from the light of day to the dark of night.

From the above, we can see that many different systems in our bodies have a rhythm. This temporal organization of our physiology is critical for our health.
Disruption of our circadian rhythm has been linked to many disease processes, including metabolic syndrome, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disease, intestinal dysbiosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and cancer.

In the past, we had predictable periods of daily light and dark, driven by the sun rising and setting. These set our circadian rhythms. When it was daylight, the physiology on the left-hand side of the infographic applied and when it was dark, that on the right-hand side applied.

The electric light bulb
But then the electric light bulb was invented.  This has significantly impacted our light and dark cycle, drastically reducing the dark part.  The part when our body is healing.
Our boundaries of light and dark are now blurred. The sun goes down and we turn on the lights. Instead of natural light-dark cycles, we now use lights to illuminate us for 4 or more extra hours. Our biological processes are consequently not as synchronized as they used to be. This means hormones, gene expression, immune function, mood, metabolism, our gut microbiota may all be affected.

Light:dark time importance
Light and dark are the key. It’s not just asleep and awake. It is those triggers that shift us from one stage to the other and having a rhythm that the body can be entrained towards.  Our nighttime physiology is our dark physiology not just sleep physiology. The dark transitions us. Things begin to change as the light disappears.

Time to go back to the light of fires and candles? 
Obviously, we don’t want to give up the convenience of our electric lights and stop using light emitting electronic devices like televisions, computers, iPhones etc at night. None of this huddling around the fire or candles to read our paper. But if this light is affecting our health is there something we can do? I’ll explore some options next week.
In the meantime, pay attention to how many hours you use lights in the house after it is dark outside. How bright are your lights at home? How close to bedtime do you watch TV or use computer/phone screens? If you get up in the night to go to the bathroom, do you switch the light on?
If you want to make sure you receive next week’s blog post, please sign up for it to be delivered to your email box. I don’t send anything else. Just 2 blog posts a week. The sign-up box is on the top right-hand side of this page. Just enter your email address.

Sleep tight.

 Ruth Baillie is originally from the UK and now lives most of the year in Northern California. She holds two Master’s degrees, one in Personalized Nutrition (distinction), and another in Health Psychology. She is a Registered Nutritional Therapist, Certified Professional Cancer Coach, and Cancer Guide, and has undertaken considerable post-graduate studies in integrative naturopathic oncology. She is the author of “Choices in mind-body medicine for cancer patients in Sonoma County, California” and her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals.

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Photo source: Imgur.com

 

Protein Rich, Sugar-Free & Vegan Hot Chocolate Recipe

This hot chocolate mix is packed with protein and is the answer to a daily high calorie, sugar-free warm chocolate comfort drink. This protein powder hot chocolate mix makes four cups. Always use organic ingredients hen possible.

Protein Powder Hot Chocolate Mix

  • 1 cup Chocolate Brown Rice Protein Powder
  • 1/2 cup Monk Fruit Sweetener or sweetener of choice
  • 1/4 Dark Cocoa Powder (sift cocoa powder)

Directions To Make 1 Cup of Hot Chocolate

  1. Add 7 tablespoons of very well mixed hot chocolate ingredients to a mug.
  2. Add 1/2 cup of boiling hot water and mix very well so no clumps remain.
  3. Add another 1/2 cup warmed nut milk, mix again and enjoy.

A healthy diet is only one of several factors that can affect the immune system; exercise and stress management are just as important in improving your overall health and well-being.

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DawnBradford Co-Founder of Breast Cancer YogaAbout Dawn Bradford Lange: Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

 

Freaking Awesome High Protein Pumpkin Bread Recipe (Vegan & Sugar-Free)

A vegan sugar-free diet can be safe for anyone undergoing cancer treatment; however, working with a registered dietitian to develop the right meal plan for you is recommended. We hope this high protein pumpkin bread recipe will help in the planning of a healthy lifestyle diet that meets the special nutritional needs of patients with cancer. Always use organic ingredients when necessary.

Ingredients

1 cup pumpkin puree
1 whole egg alternative (1/4 unsweetened apple sauce mixed with 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder)
¼ cup alkaline water
¼ cup oil
½ cup sugar substitute (molasses, agave or maple syrup
1 cup whole wheat flour
¼ cup / 1 large scoop protein powder (vanilla or unflavored)
1 tsp baking soda
½ tsp fine grain sea salt
¼ tsp cinnamon
¼ tsp ground nutmeg
¼ tsp ground ginger
a pinch of black pepper

Optional: chopped walnuts, dark chocolate chips, cranberries, cherries or raisins.

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).
  2. Lightly grease and flour a loaf pan.
  3. In a medium bowl combine pumpkin puree, egg replacement, oil, water, and sugar substitute. Whisk until well combined.
  4. In another bowl, combine whole wheat flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, salt, pepper and baking soda. Carefully stir the dry ingredients into the wet mixture until just combined. Do not overmix.
  5. Pour the mixture into the loaf pan. If you feel like, sprinkle some oats on top.
    Bake for 45 to 50 minutes. The bread is ready when a toothpick or skewer inserted into the center comes out clean. You want to get that beautiful orange/gold color on the cake, but at the same time you don’t want to bake all the moisture out of it

A healthy diet is only one of several factors that can affect the immune system; exercise and stress management are just as important in improving your overall health and well-being.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

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DawnBradford Co-Founder of Breast Cancer YogaAbout Dawn Bradford Lange: Co-founder of Breast Cancer Yoga. Dawn is making a difference with Breast Cancer Yoga therapeutic products designed to support you emotionally and physically during breast cancer . We want to give you the attention and personal service you need so please email us at info@breastcanceryoga.com if you have questions.

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